closing tag is in template navbar
timefactors watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: Engineered insolence - iPhones

  1. #1

    Engineered insolence - iPhones

    I have heard a few people say similar, and was always mostly dismissive - not naive enough to think that big firms would not build in points of failure of equipment in order to replace it - but the tales of updates to phones making them break, I had poo-poo’d somewhat.

    And now… my iPhone X.
    In updated to iOS 15.2 the other day, and immediately on restart, the screen started playing up.

    It acts as though someone was pressing buttons like a crazy person, roughly across the central 3rd of the screen.

    I reset it and uploaded a fresh config from iCloud and it was/is better - but still there and intermittent.

    Am so furious I have upgraded to a new phone!

    Anyone seen any similar real world probs/actual experience?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  2. #2
    My daughters x did the same thing. It's a known issue and as long as yours is under a certain age (cant remember what age, sorry) they will fix/replace it. Hers was out of the period so she had to buy a new phone although I purchased it online for her and we traded inn her old (broken) phone and got the full £150 back. Not sure if that helps.....

    Sent from my SM-G781B using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Master Skier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cheltenham, UK
    Posts
    2,671
    I gave my iPhone X to my father as it had facial recognition and he was struggling with the fingerprint unlocking. I updated his phone to iOS 15.2 almost as soon as it was available without any issue whatsoever.

  4. #4
    Grand Master Dave+63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    East Sussex
    Posts
    14,038
    I’m running 15.1 on an XR with no issues.

    I think you may just be unlucky.

  5. #5
    My X is running IOS 15.2 without any problems at all, I always do my updates as soon as they are available but to be honest I seldom notice anything different for better or worse.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave+63 View Post
    I’m running 15.1 on an XR with no issues.

    I think you may just be unlucky.
    Ditto that.

    (Although just having checked my XR I see there's now 15.2 available).

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  7. #7
    My daughter’s iPhone X runs iOS 15.2 with no issues. Apple support their older hardware a lot better than most manufacturers. My Mum was using an iPhone 6S Plus with the iOS 15.2 uo until a week ago. I don’t think there are any other phone manufacturers who update their phones for so long.

  8. #8
    Grand Master Onelasttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Everywhere, yet nowhere...
    Posts
    11,120
    Quote Originally Posted by notenoughwrists View Post


    Am so furious I have upgraded to a new phone!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    New iPhone? Hilarious

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Onelasttime View Post
    New iPhone? Hilarious
    I know…
    I have already punched myself in the nob for my behaviour.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by notenoughwrists View Post
    I know…
    I have already punched myself in the nob for my behaviour.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I'd punch the insolent phone.

  11. #11
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Everywhere & nowhere, baby
    Posts
    33,697
    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    I'd punch the insolent phone.
    Stop being obsolescent!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    Stop being obsolescent!
    Engineered Obsolesence was my intended thread title, but it auto-corrected to insolence and that seemed so much more fitting!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  13. #13

    Engineered insolence - iPhones

    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    I'd punch the insolent phone.
    I have thrown it to the ground, wuffly, a number of times already this week.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  14. #14
    Master Tenko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    South East
    Posts
    1,835
    My two boys iPhone 7's bricked after upgrading to IOS 15. Similar issues on both, one had no sound when making or receiving calls and the other failed to pick up a mobile network signal at all. Took both to independent repairers and neither could fix the issues. Can I reset them and reload an older version of IOS and get them functioning again?

    Strangely, I set them both up on Gen 1 iPhone SE's and both are on the latest software and working fine!

  15. #15
    Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Yorkshireman at heart
    Posts
    2,547
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by notenoughwrists View Post
    I have heard a few people say similar, and was always mostly dismissive - not naive enough to think that big firms would not build in points of failure of equipment in order to replace it - but the tales of updates to phones making them break, I had poo-poo’d somewhat.

    And now… my iPhone X.
    In updated to iOS 15.2 the other day, and immediately on restart, the screen started playing up.

    It acts as though someone was pressing buttons like a crazy person, roughly across the central 3rd of the screen.

    I reset it and uploaded a fresh config from iCloud and it was/is better - but still there and intermittent.

    Am so furious I have upgraded to a new phone!

    Anyone seen any similar real world probs/actual experience?



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I’ve got the same on my iPhone X. I’ve switched it off until the next downgrade.

  16. #16
    Smartphones can be full of problems from all brands.

    If you google it you will see update deaths / issues going back to the earliest iphones.

  17. #17
    Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Mountsorrel uk
    Posts
    1,540
    I always dread updating tech most of the time I would leave it if it works ok but now everything seems to have pop ups telling you to up date then you give in and something buggers up

  18. #18
    Master murkeywaters's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Near the sea
    Posts
    6,688
    My iPhone XS is running 15.1 and I dont want to tempt fate but its been a brilliant phone, had it for 3 1/2 years, charge most nights, battery still going well, dont get any glitches or problems, in general I find iPhones stable and like most things Apple they just do what they do well..

  19. #19
    Master
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    The Far East (of England)
    Posts
    2,708
    Mk 1, Mk 2, Mk 3, Mk 4, Mk5, ........................... sound familiar? Marketing exercises! My ex boss bought a brand new Bentley in 1964 and ran it for 40 years without any major problems apart from consumables. His grandson's three year old one is constantly requiring attention to electronics, various electric motors and engine/gearbox/suspension management systems. The "smarter" they get, the more problems there are! Anything with electronics control is great, when it is working correctly and the manufacturers continue to "support" it - but why would they, if they can sell you a new one or charge vast amounts to "look after" what you have?

  20. #20
    I'm an electronics design engineer. I do industrial rather than consumer kit.

    I can tell you that planned obsolescence is a byproduct rather than a design goal.

    For example, The kit that I'm currently designing has a rechargeable battery. I have sized that battery to last seven years. Two years in manufacturing and sitting on a warehouse shelf, followed by five years in product.
    The battery is designed to outlast the warranty, so we don't have to change it under warranty, because changing the battery is expensive and disruptive to the customer.
    I could have designed the battery to last longer. But that would have made it larger and more expensive. More expensive means less profit, and there is absolutely no return on this extra spend.
    What I couldn't do is make the battery last as long as the rest of the system. There's kit in the field over twelve years old that's still running. We can't support it any more. We couldn't get the parts even if we wanted to.

    So I have to draw a line somewhere. It has to be beyond what the warranty covers.

    The same is true of the connectors in our kit. They have an expected life. The connector manufacturer tells you how many plug/unplug cycles the connector is rated for. The USB connector on your phone will be just the same. Lets say your phone is designed to have a useful life of 3 years. Average 2 plugs per day, that's 365*2*3 = 2190.

    Should the manufacturer fit a $0.20 cent connector rated at 5000 cycles, or a $1 connector rated at 10000 cycles?


    As for software upgrades breaking kit. That's incompetence / laziness / cost cutting.
    It simply means that the software released hasn't been tested fully on all the hardware variants. There are likely multiple variants of each product, with under the hood changes that the consumer will never see. Ensuring that a new firmware release doesn't break something requires a fairly complex test matrix. For example, if there are two versions of the iphone X screen and three versions of the motherboard, then there are six combinations of hardware that could be tested. If there are four versions of boot code that could be running on those six versions of hardware, then that's 24 combinations. And you can't just test one unit, you need many to cover manufacturing variations.

    It quickly becomes impossible to test all possible combinations. You have to pick and choose based on what's changing. Sometimes we get it wrong.

    Sorry!

  21. #21
    Master IAmATeaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NW London
    Posts
    4,622
    I found the kids old Samsung S4 phones in a drawer the other day, decided to charge them to see if they even worked. To my surprise they charged and I actually used one for the entire day and it still had a decent battery life.

    Couldn’t update Android so they had been left behind but the phone reminded me of the days when you could open up the back and replace the battery yourself.

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeveal View Post
    I'm an electronics design engineer. I do industrial rather than consumer kit.

    I can tell you that planned obsolescence is a byproduct rather than a design goal.

    For example, The kit that I'm currently designing has a rechargeable battery. I have sized that battery to last seven years. Two years in manufacturing and sitting on a warehouse shelf, followed by five years in product.
    The battery is designed to outlast the warranty, so we don't have to change it under warranty, because changing the battery is expensive and disruptive to the customer.
    I could have designed the battery to last longer. But that would have made it larger and more expensive. More expensive means less profit, and there is absolutely no return on this extra spend.
    What I couldn't do is make the battery last as long as the rest of the system. There's kit in the field over twelve years old that's still running. We can't support it any more. We couldn't get the parts even if we wanted to.

    So I have to draw a line somewhere. It has to be beyond what the warranty covers.

    The same is true of the connectors in our kit. They have an expected life. The connector manufacturer tells you how many plug/unplug cycles the connector is rated for. The USB connector on your phone will be just the same. Lets say your phone is designed to have a useful life of 3 years. Average 2 plugs per day, that's 365*2*3 = 2190.

    Should the manufacturer fit a $0.20 cent connector rated at 5000 cycles, or a $1 connector rated at 10000 cycles?


    As for software upgrades breaking kit. That's incompetence / laziness / cost cutting.
    It simply means that the software released hasn't been tested fully on all the hardware variants. There are likely multiple variants of each product, with under the hood changes that the consumer will never see. Ensuring that a new firmware release doesn't break something requires a fairly complex test matrix. For example, if there are two versions of the iphone X screen and three versions of the motherboard, then there are six combinations of hardware that could be tested. If there are four versions of boot code that could be running on those six versions of hardware, then that's 24 combinations. And you can't just test one unit, you need many to cover manufacturing variations.

    It quickly becomes impossible to test all possible combinations. You have to pick and choose based on what's changing. Sometimes we get it wrong.

    Sorry!
    Excellent response, makes sense and appreciate the level of detail.

  23. #23
    You're very welcome.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Do Not Sell My Personal Information