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Thread: Watchwinder recommdation

  1. #1
    Master
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    Watchwinder recommdation

    Hi folks. Asking for a friend. I'm not after pros and cons of having one, I'm in the cons camp myself.

    Mate looking to get one as rotates a range of Rolex.

    Interested in 1, 2 or even 3 watch watchwinder.

    Any suggestions/recommendations. I believe that one needs to find one with flexible phasing (so not winding more than needed) and isolated motor(s) so magnetism doesn't affect the watch.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Grand Master
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    I use Wolf, and they do the flex phrasing and have separate motors that you can control individually.

  3. #3
    Grand Master
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    I used an MTE 4 watch winder for several years. Replaced the motor once (it broke down after around 7 years of continuous use), the 2nd one also lasted around 7 years, but as of yet have not replaced it - probably as I have way too many watches to fit on one :)
    /vince ..


  4. #4
    Craftsman
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    Iíve got a couple of Aevitas but they struggle with my large watches,changing over to Wolf.

  5. #5
    Grand Master
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    Hereís a question: how do you adjust the winder and match it to the watch? Genuine question, I could do it from first principles if I had to, but it wouldnít be easy.

    If a watch had a power reserve indicator that would help a lot.

    The situation you want to avoid is having the watch fully wound with the mainspring slipping against the inside of the barrel wall excessively. If the watch is 80% fully wound when it goes on the winder the aim would be to maintain this. The ideal winder would monitor the amplitude and aim to maintain it within a set range, but thatís adding a significant layer of complexity to say the least.

    Iím still strongly against these things but Iím curious to know how folks set them up.

  6. #6
    Craftsman
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    My Aevitas run for nine hours in a twenty four hour period.

  7. #7
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Hereís a question: how do you adjust the winder and match it to the watch? Genuine question, I could do it from first principles if I had to, but it wouldnít be easy.

    If a watch had a power reserve indicator that would help a lot.

    The situation you want to avoid is having the watch fully wound with the mainspring slipping against the inside of the barrel wall excessively. If the watch is 80% fully wound when it goes on the winder the aim would be to maintain this. The ideal winder would monitor the amplitude and aim to maintain it within a set range, but thatís adding a significant layer of complexity to say the least.

    Iím still strongly against these things but Iím curious to know how folks set them up.
    ive only noticed mine winding 3 times a day. its not doing anything more often than its moving.
    I haven't done anything to set it up.

    Im on the fence with them really, the only reason I use a winder is because the 2 watches that are on it are absolute bitches to set bang on the markers and I figure id probably cause more wear and tear resetting them to get on the markers than I would by correct setting and leaving them on an intermittent wind.

    I could just not care about them being on the markers when the seconds hit 12 but its teeth grindingly irritating for me.

  8. #8
    Master
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    Thanks all.

  9. #9
    Master jukeboxs's Avatar
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    I'd question whether he needs a winder. I rotate 10+ Rolex and several other watches, and don't feel the need for a winder - happy to set when I wear them. But then, my most complicated watches are GMTs (no Skydwellers in my collection). Although it's a bit of pain setting my non-hacking Pateks, I must admit. Unless you have serious complications, I viewed winders as adding to wear rather than being an overall benefit.

  10. #10
    Craftsman mitch1956's Avatar
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    the best ? promised myself one of theses one day
    The Bernard Favre watch winders

    https://watchwinders.co.uk/watchwind...leather-watch-

  11. #11
    Grand Master
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    The technology's available to produce a really 'smart' watchwinder with a built-in timegrapher function. This would control the watch to a set amplitude and could be programmed to always leave the watch in the dial-up position when not rotating. The overall rate during storage still wouldn't match the rate observed during a typical period of wear but it's likely to be more consistent. Ideally, it could be programmed to 'park' in whatever position the owner choses, thus allowing a degree of compensation for fast or slow running.

    This would safeguard against wear to the barrel, essentially keeping the watch 70%-80% fully wound, and minimising needless wear to the rotor bearing.

    There are good reasons why this won't happen; the more expensive watches are generally sold on aesthetics rather than technical content and the majority of owners wouldn't grasp the advantages.

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