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Thread: InvestIng in wines and whisky casks

  1. #1
    Master Iceblue's Avatar
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    InvestIng in wines and whisky casks

    Hi all

    being a total novice when it comes to this subject has anyone invested into wines or whisky’s casks

    I have had a read of the information that I’ve been sent and was wondering what the pros and cons are investing , anyone done this as I would like to hear about the experience you may have had

    Look forward to the reply’s

  2. #2
    Master subseastu's Avatar
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    I tried it a few years ago with a crowd called vin-x. I thought it'd be relatively easy money as fine wine is a finite resource and at the time China was drinking no end of it. From my own experience I'd say avoid it. I lost about half my initial investment. Vin-x at the time seemed to have a very high turn over of "advisors" and not one of them resulted in making any profit on their advise for me. Proceed with caution.

    Sent from my H8314 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Master Iceblue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by subseastu View Post
    I tried it a few years ago with a crowd called vin-x. I thought it'd be relatively easy money as fine wine is a finite resource and at the time China was drinking no end of it. From my own experience I'd say avoid it. I lost about half my initial investment. Vin-x at the time seemed to have a very high turn over of "advisors" and not one of them resulted in making any profit on their advise for me. Proceed with caution.

    Sent from my H8314 using Tapatalk
    Cheers for the advise I must admit admit it doesn’t seem so straight forward when you start reading all the info from the company’s

  4. #4
    Master Tifa's Avatar
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    A friend and myself bought 3 casks of Bruchladdich about 15 years ago.
    Cost was £750 a cask, which made it worthwhile.
    We sold 66% of the Scotch back to the distillery to cover the excise duty & bottling fees.
    Would love to buy another cask or two, but they are stupidly expensive these days.
    I didn't buy as an investment, but if you actually do the maths, you can expect to pay in the region of £40 a bottle.

  5. #5
    Master Iceblue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    A friend and myself bought 3 casks of Bruchladdich about 15 years ago.
    Cost was £750 a cask, which made it worthwhile.
    We sold 66% of the Scotch back to the distillery to cover the excise duty & bottling fees.
    Would love to buy another cask or two, but they are stupidly expensive these days.
    I didn't buy as an investment, but if you actually do the maths, you can expect to pay in the region of £40 a bottle.
    That’s what I was working out the price per bottle if I was to sell back to them and bottle some for myself but the maths don’t seem to work out and I thought it was me working it out wrong lol

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    A friend and myself bought 3 casks of Bruchladdich about 15 years ago.
    Cost was £750 a cask, which made it worthwhile.
    We sold 66% of the Scotch back to the distillery to cover the excise duty & bottling fees.
    Would love to buy another cask or two, but they are stupidly expensive these days.
    I didn't buy as an investment, but if you actually do the maths, you can expect to pay in the region of £40 a bottle.
    So for those 3 Bruichladdich casks, it was more of a means of eventually buying the booze at a discount rather than really getting an investment payout at the end of it?

    This was certainly more my understanding of buying a cask. I didn't think private buyers ever went into them to 'make' money at the end of it, unlike a more traditional investment scheme.

  7. #7
    Master
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    Whisky casks were a great investment years ago but the prices have shot right up and some of the distilleries wont sell you them anymore.
    Nice to have for a bit of interest though.

  8. #8
    Master
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    There was a story on the news the other day about some bloke that bought 2 casks of whiskey a few years ago for 3.5k and just sold them for 220k

  9. #9
    Master Tifa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael 38 View Post
    There was a story on the news the other day about some bloke that bought 2 casks of whiskey a few years ago for 3.5k and just sold them for 220k
    Yep, it can happen. But you stand more chance of finding a Picasso in your loft.
    We did it as a bit of fun, we 'visited' it at the distillery every year as part of our annual Scottish motorcycle tour.
    Futures are definitely not an 'investment'

  10. #10
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceblue View Post
    I have had a read of the information that I’ve been sent and was wondering what the pros and cons are investing , anyone done this as I would like to hear about the experience you may have had
    The marketing for “unusual” investment opportunities is usually very convincing. And often there’s an inverse relationship between the quality of the marketing and the performance of the investment!!

    I’ve lost enough money over the years on conventional investments through my own bad decisions but wouldn’t invest in anything unless (a) I knew a lot about it or (b) the promoter was regulated (FCA?).

  11. #11
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    Yep, it can happen. But you stand more chance of finding a Picasso in your loft.
    This Tommy Cooper joke came into my mind when you said that:

    I inherited a painting and a violin which turned out to be a Rembrandt and a Stradivarius. Unfortunately, Rembrandt made lousy violins and Stradivarius was a terrible painter.”

  12. #12
    Journeyman
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    Quote Originally Posted by David_D View Post
    This Tommy Cooper joke came into my mind when you said that:

    ā€¯I inherited a painting and a violin which turned out to be a Rembrandt and a Stradivarius. Unfortunately, Rembrandt made lousy violins and Stradivarius was a terrible painter.ā€¯
    love this


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  13. #13
    I've bought wine en primeur for probably 30 years.

    I started off by buying two cases of everything, then selling the second case some years later to pay for the first. It worked pretty much flawlessly.

    Then I started buying bigger and bigger quantities, ten or more cases of each wine, as a specific investment. That also worked but not quite as well. Every now and again I needed money and would flog some of the wine.

    And I think the lesson I learnt then was that you have to stay in it for really quite a long long time to make the real money.

    For example, I once bought 13 cases of 1995 Chateau Smith Haut Lafitte en primeur. It was around £275 a case from memory. Ten years later it was only at around £350 a case. Five years after that it snuck up to £500, pretty slow growth. I needed some cash and so I had to sell. Now it would be worth £1000 a case, possibly more. (I'd have hoped it would have got to that level much quicker...fool that I was.)

    The second thing I learnt was this: don't experiment on what you buy. I tried buying outstanding South American and Australian wines in quantity. But the secondary market for such things is very limited and the prices feeble relative to the quality.

    These days, I've gone back to my original strategy: I buy Burgundy and mid range Bordeaux and then sell the Bordeaux to pay for the Burgundy.

    Works for me.

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