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Thread: Bumble Bees

  1. #1

    Bumble Bees

    Demolishing a garden shed and unfortunately(?) found bumble bee nest underneath. Don't want to harm them and got rid of half the (wooden) base and will leave rest for now. Have skip but will take the remainder to tip myself when I can, no rush really.

    Anyone know about these bees - will they go of their own accord before the Winter or I'll have to encourage them to leave? Was hoping the disturbance might make them leave but hasn't worked!

  2. #2
    Craftsman r.dawson's Avatar
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    Depending where you are someone will come and re-home them. We have a local guy that will do it.

  3. #3
    Grand Master
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    End of September for bumbles.

  4. #4
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by r.dawson View Post
    Depending where you are someone will come and re-home them. We have a local guy that will do it.
    Do they rehome bumbles?, Round our way it's just honey bees that get rehomed.

  5. #5
    Grand Master MartynJC (UK)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seadog1408 View Post
    End of September for bumbles.
    agreed - depends a bit on species.

    if you can’t wait - some guidance here. https://www.honeybeesuite.com/how-to...le-bee-nest-2/

    if no rush then wait to end of summer and they will be gone anyway. (Only the queen bee hibernates over winter)

    "Time is an illusion, lunchtime doubly so”. HHGTTG


  6. #6
    Thanks everyone, if it’s end of September I’ll wait until then. Not sure of species - yellow and black but looking on line there’s a lot of very similar ones!

    One more question - presumably the queen will find somewhere else to hibernate otherwise still might be disturbed?

  7. #7
    Grand Master MartynJC (UK)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Thanks everyone, if it’s end of September I’ll wait until then. Not sure of species - yellow and black but looking on line there’s a lot of very similar ones!

    One more question - presumably the queen will find somewhere else to hibernate otherwise still might be disturbed?

    https://www.bumblebeeconservation.org/lifecycle/

    "Time is an illusion, lunchtime doubly so”. HHGTTG


  8. #8
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Best to look up your local beekeeping club, they will often give the best advice.
    “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”

  9. #9
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
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    Well done for not just nuking it.

  10. #10
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogthrob View Post
    Well done for not just nuking it.
    Yes, insects usually get the extermination treatment even when benign.
    “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”

  11. #11
    We have Lime trees, because of this the ground gets coated in sugar, I always feel really guilty if I stand on a bumble bee

  12. #12

    Bumble Bees

    We had them under a shed a couple of years ago, at the end of the summer they disappeared and haven’t been back - I think their nest is much smaller with far fewer bees but again there are so many different species


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  13. #13
    Coincidentally, I read this thread yesterday and about 30 minutes later went into the garden and noticed a lot of bees around my chimney stack. They definitely weren't there the day before as I was out all day cutting the grass in the fine weather.

    Got my binoculars out and it appears they have set up a nest getting access through a decent crack in the mortar, just near the top of the stack where the chimney pots are. That particular chimney is lined with a flue down to a log burner in the living room.

    Looks like honey bees (NOT bumble bees) too from what I can see. I don't like having to contemplate destroying the nest, but I'm concerned about the comb and the potential risk of fire and damage from the wax and honey. If they were at the bottom of the garden under a shed I'd definitely leave them, but these seem too close for comfort. What are people's thoughts?

  14. #14
    Master
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    I’ve damaged a bumblebee nest on the ground, what can I do?

    Depending on the level of damage, the bumblebees will aim to repair parts of the nest that were damaged. It is best to leave the area alone and see if the bumblebees can repair it. If necessary, place an upturned flower pot over the nest to give them some shelter."

    Bumblebee nest FAQs - Bumblebee Conservation Trust
    Last edited by Tinker; 13th July 2021 at 08:26.

  15. #15
    Journeyman
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    Bumble bees do not form colonies like honey bees. Honey bee queens will continue laying eggs for a few years, the workers’ and drones’ lifetimes are much shorter, but the colony will establish in one place and stay there for ages with multiple brood cycles.
    Bumble bees are all ‘single season’ I think and nests are used for one brood and then abandoned.

    Quote Originally Posted by j0hnbarker View Post
    Got my binoculars out and it appears they have set up a nest getting access through a decent crack in the mortar, just near the top of the stack where the chimney pots are. That particular chimney is lined with a flue down to a log burner in the living room.

    Looks like honey bees (NOT bumble bees) too from what I can see. I don't like having to contemplate destroying the nest, but I'm concerned about the comb and the potential risk of fire and damage from the wax and honey. If they were at the bottom of the garden under a shed I'd definitely leave them, but these seem too close for comfort. What are people's thoughts?
    I’d recommend contacting the local bee club for advice (beekeepers are always keen to catch a swarm), though a swarm in a chimney cavity is going to be hard work and they may not be interested or able to help. You need to move pretty quickly before they have settled in.
    When you have got rid of them get someone to sort out the cracks in the mortar - often swarms will leave pheromones that will attract swarms in subsequent years.

    PS - my partner is the beekeeper, but I have spent plenty of time waiting at bee talks and helping out to pick up a little about it.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexG View Post
    Bumble bees do not form colonies like honey bees. Honey bee queens will continue laying eggs for a few years, the workers’ and drones’ lifetimes are much shorter, but the colony will establish in one place and stay there for ages with multiple brood cycles.
    Bumble bees are all ‘single season’ I think and nests are used for one brood and then abandoned.



    I’d recommend contacting the local bee club for advice (beekeepers are always keen to catch a swarm), though a swarm in a chimney cavity is going to be hard work and they may not be interested or able to help. You need to move pretty quickly before they have settled in.
    When you have got rid of them get someone to sort out the cracks in the mortar - often swarms will leave pheromones that will attract swarms in subsequent years.

    PS - my partner is the beekeeper, but I have spent plenty of time waiting at bee talks and helping out to pick up a little about it.
    If they are honey bees I’d deffo ring them local beekeeper brigade - as stated in the prev post they do go to some lengths to save them


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  17. #17
    Master murkeywaters's Avatar
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    I like bumble bees, hopefully you get them a safe home.

    Just be thankful you dont have Bats in your shed, in terms of protection its the equivalent of finding the Ark of the Covenant under your patio..

  18. #18
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogthrob View Post
    Well done for not just nuking it.
    +1

    Bees get preferential treatment from me.

    Hornets not so much.

  19. #19
    Around here in Brighton with our beloved Green council it's a new policy to include a Bee Brick in construction projects as part of planning policy for solitary bees in a South facing wall. Even when the wall is in a narrow shady damp alleyway with salty coastal winds driving driving up them and no chance of any Bee ever wanting to live there! I'd just leave them Bee until the winter unless you're in a desperate hurry.

  20. #20
    Master
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    I had a load set up inside the soffit of the house a few weeks back.
    It was right outside bedroom window and there were loads swarming about.
    Didn’t have much choice but to destroy them as it would have been a major and dangerous job to try and shift them.
    Used the powder stuff that you put at the point they enter and it worked pretty quickly.
    Your nest sounds a lot more accessible to shift.


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  21. #21
    The bees will be gone by September, if they haven't already.
    One of my neighbours had the same issue, but they've now disappeared.

  22. #22
    Master Alex L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adrianw View Post
    We have Lime trees, because of this the ground gets coated in sugar, I always feel really guilty if I stand on a bumble bee
    they're like catnip for bees, we've a line of limes and the buzzing is incredible for a couple of weeks

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