closing tag is in template navbar
Time Factors Watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Results 1 to 44 of 44

Thread: Toolkit contents, what do you recommend?

  1. #1

    Toolkit contents, what do you recommend?

    DIY, not watch fiddling. I’ve been asked to put together a home toolkit for a woman. As I’m the bloke in a female dominated extended family I’m the supposed expert, although know nowt.

    These were my thoughts. Many experts on the forum, what do you think, add a small coping saw, electrical safety screwdriver, stud/cable/pipe tester, ditch the adjustable ( I’m not a fan)?

    Not going to give her my crappy old stuff, brand new ones, can’t wait to get to the tool shop.




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Master reggie747's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    The Mersey Riviera
    Posts
    5,817
    Looks like you've got it covered there.....not sure a coping saw is gonna be too much good if I'm honest unless of course the lady in question really likes faffing around with stuff in which case she should maybe join a night class and buy herself a floor standing scroll saw 🤣
    Bear in mind, if she can't do it, you're gonna get the call anyway man.....

  3. #3
    I also enjoy buying tools for others! Lovely knowing they're getting something useful and that'll last.

    I'd add:
    - some decent superglue with a fine applicator tip to that, not two part self mix as that seems to deter people
    - small screw driver set with bits for e.g. torx and small Phillips, flat, hex etc. included. These are usually quite cheap to buy and OK for very occasional use.
    - security fixings set. These can again be had for not much money if you're not worried about using them in power tools, and could get her out of an irritating pinch.
    - radiator key
    - spare blades for the hack saw and knife. Nothing worse than trying to use used, blunt and rusted blades.

  4. #4
    Master sweets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bristol - UK
    Posts
    5,077
    Looks great, some possible inclusions

    A simple scraper (a side on Stanley blade type)
    One chisel
    Baby screwdrivers for spectacles/shades, battery compartments and so forth
    small lever iron / tack lifter

    D

  5. #5
    Master
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Lancashire
    Posts
    2,406
    Good start

    Always like to have a plunger handy for sinks and toilets.

  6. #6
    Master Iceblue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Bedfordshire
    Posts
    1,620
    Blog Entries
    1

    You missing one vital thing






    A plaster

  7. #7
    Grand Master JasonM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cambridgeshire
    Posts
    14,824
    Some consumables? PTFE tape, electrical tape, duct tape. electrical block connectors, spare plug fuses.
    Cheers..
    Jase

  8. #8
    Grand Master wileeeeeey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    N/A
    Posts
    11,039
    Meter key is always handy along with radiator keys already mentioned. We have about 5 or 6 radiator keys as they always seem to be a nightmare to find.

  9. #9
    Wow gents, thanks for all the quick replies and excellent top tips. Plasters - good one! I guess I will get called out for anything difficult and definitely if the toilet is involved. It's always handy to have tools there. She's not useless, is/was an engineer, but likes to take a more supervisory role. Always lovely sketches and spot on measurements for the list of tasks.

    Off tool shopping this afters.

  10. #10
    Master reggie747's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    The Mersey Riviera
    Posts
    5,817
    Quote Originally Posted by wileeeeeey View Post
    Meter key is always handy along with radiator keys already mentioned. We have about 5 or 6 radiator keys as they always seem to be a nightmare to find.
    On your keyring is the plum place to keep one !!

  11. #11
    Get a saw blade for that Stanley knife (or knife that will take one).

  12. #12
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    13,904
    The hammer just about covers it. Not sure what the rest of the stuff's for. :-)


    Joking aside, I'd probably add a second, larger nutfucker adjustable spanner - this is one of the most useful general home maintenance tools.


    I notice there's no drill/driver. Will making holes smaller than the face of the hammer be required? If a drill is added, then also include advice on how not to drill through pipes and cables.


    A selection of screws and wall plugs would be very useful.


    A small pull / flush cut saw would be an idea, or maybe a toolbox saw.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by hogthrob View Post
    I notice there's no drill/driver. Will making holes smaller than the face of the hammer be required? If a drill is added, then also include advice on how not to drill through pipes and cables.
    Drilling through pipes and cables, that’ll be my job.

    Good idea to add plug and screws so they’re always to hand.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Lytham
    Posts
    201
    Quote Originally Posted by reggie747 View Post
    Looks like you've got it covered there.....not sure a coping saw is gonna be too much good if I'm honest unless of course the lady in question really likes faffing around with stuff in which case she should maybe join a night class and buy herself a floor standing scroll saw 🤣
    Bear in mind, if she can't do it, you're gonna get the call anyway man.....
    Where’s the coping saw, I can see a Junior

  15. #15
    Master reggie747's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    The Mersey Riviera
    Posts
    5,817
    Quote Originally Posted by edzt View Post
    Where’s the coping saw, I can see a Junior
    There isn't one, he asked whether to put one in 👍

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by hogthrob View Post
    The hammer just about covers it. Not sure what the rest of the stuff's for. :-)


    Joking aside, I'd probably add a second, larger nutfucker adjustable spanner - this is one of the most useful general home maintenance tools.


    I notice there's no drill/driver. Will making holes smaller than the face of the hammer be required? If a drill is added, then also include advice on how not to drill through pipes and cables.


    A selection of screws and wall plugs would be very useful.


    A small pull / flush cut saw would be an idea, or maybe a toolbox saw.
    My attitude as well. If you can't do it with a hammer, you just need a bigger hammer!

    Sent from my H3113 using Tapatalk

  17. #17
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    18,134
    Ask if she’s ever used any tools. If not sometimes not having tools is a better option.
    I’d stick to a hammer and a couple of screwdrivers.
    “The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.”

  18. #18
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    north uk
    Posts
    272
    A small cordless drill/screwdriver, a spirit level. A stud/cable sensor.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    I did something similar for my cousin, A couple of other things I added for her were waterproof duct tape and an assortment of fuses.

  20. #20
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Mainly UK
    Posts
    13,721
    Inform - Educate - Entertain

  21. #21
    A box of Fischer fixings or similar- as screws and plugs that come with things are generally rubbish.

  22. #22
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Mainly UK
    Posts
    13,721
    I wouldn't want to be without a Knipex adjustable wrench (much more useful than any adjustable spanner)


    A combination square



    A head torch
    Inform - Educate - Entertain

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by wileeeeeey View Post
    Meter key is always handy along with radiator keys already mentioned. We have about 5 or 6 radiator keys as they always seem to be a nightmare to find.
    Not everyone has a meter box...
    Last edited by Kingstepper; 1st July 2021 at 00:30.

  24. #24
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ascot, Berkshire, U.K.
    Posts
    947
    Our son has just moved into his first flat, I was going to buy a box and stock it with tools.
    However, I found this and it has come in very handy as a starter. I also bought a cordless drill, a electrical pipe/electric thingy, a level, assorted Rawl plugs, some spanner’s and various types of tape.
    He is very happy with it and can add more tools or better versions as he goes along.
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/magnusson...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
    Last edited by Steve27752; 1st July 2021 at 15:36.

  25. #25
    A roll of what I call plumbers tape is a deffo
    It helps reseal (like make your own gasket) on push together or screw together plastic plumbing where you bay get a leak - costs pennies comes on a roll that looks like a roll of sellotape


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  26. #26

    Toolkit contents, what do you recommend?

    Mains testing screwdriver (+ packet fuses).
    Wood blades for that junior hacksaw.

  27. #27
    The thing I use the most is a drill to make holes and screw things in the hole I just made.

  28. #28
    Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North Wales
    Posts
    2,677
    You have missed the most important and usefull items………………….Zip ties two or 3 lengths. Brilliant for tidying up wiring or securing things in the garden.

    Lastly a tube of Gorilla glue that sticks anything to anything.

    Steve

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Curta View Post
    Great list, everything transposed to an Excel spreadsheet (as you do), except above.

    I'll print the list, put it on a clipboard, march around the tool shop ticking items off with a red pen as I add them to my basket.

    She'll be better equipped than me. I guess I won't buy everything, the most useful tools and consumables. When she needs something doing I can direct her to her toolbox and Youtube video rather than having to load up and drive 60 miles. She should be okay, three degrees (not as in "When Will I see You Again?"), two in engineering, but wouldn't want her to put a mirror in my house.

  30. #30
    Master Wolfie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Leicester
    Posts
    6,391
    Blog Entries
    1
    I use my mole grips all the time

    Cordless drill driver is an obvious omission?

    Spirit level too…. Although you can pick up later levels now for around £20

    Maybe a random orbital sander too?

  31. #31
    Zip ties x20

    Everything can be bodged/salvaged with zip ties

    Other than that, looks good. Don't put PTFE tape or cable sensors in. Your average home DIY-er isn't going to take apart a tap, or hack into plasterboard.

    I'd add some cheapo gloves, latex or nitrile....
    .... But I'm a surgeon :)

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Curta View Post
    I wouldn't want to be without a Knipex adjustable wrench (much more useful than any adjustable spanner)
    These are phenomenal bits of kit - I've given a few as gifts as they're just so good. Worth shopping around for as the prices vary substantially.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfie View Post
    I use my mole grips all the time

    Cordless drill driver is an obvious omission?

    Spirit level too…. Although you can pick up later levels now for around £20

    Maybe a random orbital sander too?
    There is a spirit level!

  34. #34
    Master Wolfie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Leicester
    Posts
    6,391
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    There is a spirit level!
    Oh yeah! A tidgy one!

  35. #35
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Cambridgeshire
    Posts
    14,529
    A G clamp is extremely useful ... plus a few small pieces of plywood to act as 'pads' when e.g. clamping and sawing ... also a set of small fine screwdrivers for removing tiny screws ... also a Tri square
    Last edited by sundial; 1st July 2021 at 13:52.
    "After a certain age you got the face you deserve I think" ... Henri Cartier-Bresson

  36. #36
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    52
    I don’t think it has been mentioned above - a set of spanners instead of an adjustable.

    Using an adjustable without a) rounding stuff, or b) slipping and hurting oneself will be a challenge for most inexperienced DIYers.

    On a similar topic…penetrating/release spray, the proper stuff makes even the nastiest nuts and bolts undoable.

  37. #37
    Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Coming Straight Outer Trumpton
    Posts
    8,466
    As you have a multi bit driver already how about some extra bits including Allen and torx heads, many more things are fixed with these nowadays

  38. #38
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    901
    You'd better add a shed to the shopping list, she's going to need one to store all this stuff in the list has got that long! Whilst everything mentioned above is useful, someone who really has no interest in DIY is just not going to use most of it. All they likely need is enough to be able to hang a few pictures and put together flat pack furniture etc. Cordless drill, drill bits, wall plugs and screws, screwdrivers, hammer, pliers, allen keys, knife, tape measure and maybe a radiator key should be enough to start with.

  39. #39
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Durham
    Posts
    610
    Swiss Army Knife - I’ve got most tools but I always find there is something I haven’t brought - in many cases a SAK provides useful cover. Besides who doesn’t love a SAK. Leatherman/Gerber will do the same job.

  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by stuie-t View Post
    You'd better add a shed to the shopping list.
    Good point, added to the Excel spreadsheet.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  41. #41
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    268
    Hooks for pics mabe some tork bits etc as anything you look at has some stupid shaped screw in it.

    Depending how handy the person is I would start with the very basics a quick nip with mole grips or similar on a radiator can end in disaster if your not holding the valve and it moves.

    Perhaps only use the tools if you've first done a job together using them.

    Good luck.

    Some rags paper dust sheet type stuff is very handy to have at hand also



    Sent from my VOG-L09 using TZ-UK mobile app

  42. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve27752 View Post
    Our son has just moved into his first flat, I was going to buy a box and stock it with tools.
    However, I found this and it has come in very handy as a starter. I also bought a cordless drill, a electrical pipe/electric thingy, a level, assorted Rawl plugs, some spanner’s and various types of tape.
    He is very happy with it and can add more tools or better versions as he goes along.
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/magnusson...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
    The dowager Casper, 88, had the larger version of this. Scavenged the more useful and put them in a small tool box for her, I took some and others given to the estate workers (the chap who cut her lawn).

    Uses them to tune her walker before zipping along the promenade.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  43. #43

    Toolkit contents, what do you recommend?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil T View Post
    Swiss Army Knife - I’ve got most tools but I always find there is something I haven’t brought - in many cases a SAK provides useful cover. Besides who doesn’t love a SAK. Leatherman/Gerber will do the same job.
    Thumbs up to the SAK, but what to chose from the hundred models on offer, irrespective of colour choice?

    Couldn’t decide, so made my own and still can’t decide.



    Huntsman ‘Light’
    Yeoman (an obsolete model)
    Yeoman with added saw.

    Liking this thread, some top tips and a wholesome, solid, manly topic.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  44. #44
    If you can't fix it with a hammer it's an electrical problem.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Do Not Sell My Personal Information