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Thread: Movies you've always intended to watch, but never got around to doing so...

  1. #51
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
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    Replying to various:

    39 Steps - all three films are good, the oldest is best fantastic.
    LOTR / Hobbit - fantastic visuals, but dialogue wise, not fully formed as films for grown ups.
    Bladerunner 2049 - well worth watching. It is slow, but if you know that before you watch, it shouldn't be a problem.
    Godfather I and II - Jeez, just effing watch them. Repeatedly.

    Scarface, Citizen Kane, The Maltese Falcon, and many of the others mentioned by GQ have aged poorly and no longer stand up as stand alone movies. They probably still have merit if you're studying film, but otherwise nothing to get excited about, imo.



    As for me, I've never watched ET (have seen bits, obviously), but never felt the need to actually sit down and watch it all. I think I've seen all the films I intended to watch though. As I become older and fartier, I feel less and less inclined to watch the films I 'ought' to watch.
    Last edited by hogthrob; 17th June 2021 at 00:28.

  2. #52
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by hogthrob View Post
    Godfather I and II - Jeez, just effing watch them. Repeatedly.
    100% - Iím jealous of someone who can watch them without knowing the story!

    Re Marvel, not watched many but agree Guardians of the Galaxy was great

    Like the look of The Angel on Netflix but also looks quite strenuous for a relaxed evening!

  3. #53
    Journeyman
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambam View Post
    Oh loads. Some that come to mind - mainly as my wife has typically bought me the DVD to encourage me to watch:

    - Scarface
    - Trainspotting
    - Full Metal Jacket
    Trainspotting- the book is a masterpiece, the film a monstrosity.

  4. #54
    Journeyman
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    Never seen Citizen Kane. I might be disappointed. Took me ages to watch 'One flew over the Cuckoo's Nest', thought subject matter strange for a film. Bloody brilliant piece of work. God! I hated that nurse.

  5. #55
    Grand Master TheFlyingBanana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EBB21 View Post
    Never seen Citizen Kane. I might be disappointed.
    I think you possibly would be - it is an extremely impressive piece of film-making at the time, and broke new ground in cinamatography and technique, but personally I've always found it rather ponderous and self-indulgent.


    As an aside, my personal view is that it isn't quite as good as the hype that has been heaped on it over the years.
    Last edited by TheFlyingBanana; 17th June 2021 at 10:35.
    So clever my foot fell off.

  6. #56
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingBanana View Post
    I think you possibly would be - it is an extremely impressive piece of film-making at the time, and broke new ground in cinamatography and technique, but personally I've always found it rather ponderous and self-indulgent.


    As an aside, my personal view is that it isn't quite as good as the hype that has been heaped on it over the years.
    That actually made me think.
    I was a real film buff in my Uni days, and while films like Citizen Kane were already old, they were seen as "classics", in the same way as an old car: Not with the bells and whistles that modern cinematography can offer, but those movies were relevant because they were the reason modern movies were made the way they were, and I am not just talking about technology, but also about scenario, acting, direction...
    Fast forward 40 years:
    There has been as much time between Rebecca, Fantasia and the Grapes of Wrath and The Empire Strikes Back as there has been since SW2.

    During that time, the film production has grown almost exponentially, powered by increased markets and increased diffusion media. I believe it makes it impossible for the normal cinema aficionado to keep up with modern film production AND have good knowledge of what was classic movies in 1980 and what has become classic movies since. And it also means that classic films are judged on their modern merits, rather than on the cultural context of the time they were produced, and the new grounds they broke.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  7. #57
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingBanana View Post

    I don't think I've watched a single Merchant Ivory movie either - probably should watch Remains of the Day sometime...?
    You should watch it - a magnificent film.
    Cheers,
    Neil.

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  8. #58
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    That actually made me think.
    I was a real film buff in my Uni days, and while films like Citizen Kane were already old, they were seen as "classics", in the same way as an old car: Not with the bells and whistles that modern cinematography can offer, but those movies were relevant because they were the reason modern movies were made the way they were, and I am not just talking about technology, but also about scenario, acting, direction...
    Fast forward 40 years:
    There has been as much time between Rebecca, Fantasia and the Grapes of Wrath and The Empire Strikes Back as there has been since SW2.

    During that time, the film production has grown almost exponentially, powered by increased markets and increased diffusion media. I believe it makes it impossible for the normal cinema aficionado to keep up with modern film production AND have good knowledge of what was classic movies in 1980 and what has become classic movies since. And it also means that classic films are judged on their modern merits, rather than on the cultural context of the time they were produced, and the new grounds they broke.
    Completely agree.
    Cheers,
    Neil.

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    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  9. #59
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingBanana View Post
    And Psycho is just seminal. A truly remarkable film that I used extensively in film studies lectures not only because it is so iconic and influential, but because it’s structure and the editing and lighting techniques were ground breaking.
    That's good enough for me, I shall watch it.

    Edited to add - Remains Of The Day is a personal favourite. I don't think any other film has quite captured the subtleties of inner turmoil and outer serenity quite as well.
    Last edited by AlphaOmega; 17th June 2021 at 13:55.

  10. #60
    Grand Master TheFlyingBanana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    That's good enough for me, I shall watch it.

    I'd be interested to hear what you think of it.


    Obviously you will already be aware of The Shower Scene, because it is probably the single most famous scene in movie history, but there is so much more to the film.

    In particular (and I'm not giving anything away here), pay attention to the lighting and the camera angles, and also the fact that it does not follow a remotely typical story structure. It is in effect two films, with a bridge in the middle.


    I would also recommend watching the official theatrical trailer, preferably after watching the movie (hosted by Hitchcock himself) - it is like nothing you've ever seen, and quite brilliant in it's own way:




    It's worth remembering, that during the 50's and 60's Hitchcock movies were a mega-brand all of their own. Hitch himself understood this very clearly, and with Psycho his company insisted to all the cinemas that they wouldn't admit any customer after the film had started. When you watch it you will understand why.
    So clever my foot fell off.

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    Good thread, A.

    I think we all need to acknowledge that if we haven't watched something it's because we don't really care that much.
    Agree, we shouldn't feel a need to watch something because it's popular or critically acclaimed.

    Personally, can't stand SciFi, fantasy (LOTR etc) or comic-book films. Generally anything where the viewer has to suspend belief in reality.

  12. #62
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    KS - agreed, I'm with Scorsese in thinking many of them are fairground rides.

    A - thanks, I had no idea Psycho was so revered. Appreciate the tips and will report back. I have back-to-back children's stuff for a few days so it will be after this weekend.

  13. #63
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
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    Now well into my eighth decade, I've seen all the films I've wanted to see (including Deep Throat!)

  14. #64
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacifichrono View Post
    Now well into my eighth decade, I've seen all the films I've wanted to see (including Deep Throat!)
    And probably "Behind the Green Door" and "The Devil in Miss Jones"
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

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