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Thread: Adjusting Bracelet Help Please

  1. #1
    Master
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    Adjusting Bracelet Help Please

    Just received my Baby Dreadnaught.... and it's very nice :-)

    I need to remove a couple of links but I'm not getting very far. I've tried with my usual jewellers set but I cannot get the screws undone for the links :-( They must be done up really tight; perhaps with Loctite?

    Any advise please? Should I just send it back to Eddie to have the bracelet adjusted?

    Thanks

    Steve
    Last edited by solwisesteve; 11th June 2021 at 08:38.

  2. #2
    Grand Master JasonM's Avatar
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    They probably are loctited in, you might need to heat the screws up, maybe in very hot water or Ive used the tip of a soldering iron on them before.
    Cheers..
    Jase

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonM View Post
    They probably are loctited in, you might need to heat the screws up, maybe in very hot water or Ive used the tip of a soldering iron on them before.
    I don't know if I'm brave enough to do that :-( If that's needed then I might email Eddie so I can send it back for adjustment.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Grand Master
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    2 or 3 seconds in a flame then quickly ease the screw out with a screwdriver that fits properly. Unless your eyesightís v. good I strongly advise using a magnifier too. Be sure to warm the correct part of the link to get the heat into the threads.

  5. #5
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    Cheers...

    I see how I get along.

    The boiling water sounds like the first (safest) thing to try :-)

  6. #6
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    Okay.... so a pair of mole grips around the shaft of the screwdriver for extra leverage and then push down HARD and the screws finally shifted. :-)

    Now on wrist and looked real nice :-)
    Last edited by solwisesteve; 11th June 2021 at 13:51.

  7. #7
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    Hairdryer to heat the glue or expand the metal etc

    Take the bracelet off first

  8. #8
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Okay.... so a pair off mole grips around the shaft of the screwdriver for extra leverage and then push down HARD and the screws finally shifted. :-)

    Now on wrist and looked real nice :-)
    Really canít recommend this, if the screws are too tight to come out with reasonable finger pressure by applying extra leverage you run a very real risk if shearing the head off the screw or breaking the threads and then youíve got real problems! I think youíve been lucky to avoid this. Some bracelets have the screwed end of the link threaded into a blind hole and you really donít want to break these screws, Rolex owners take note. Mole grips on screwdrivers is ideal for very tight woodscrews, I use this technique, but it really doesnít translate well to small- scale such as watch bracelets. Bracelet screws are small and brittle, if they wonít come out with moderate force apply some heat. If its an old watch thereís a risk the screws are corroded and theyíll need heat and penetrating oil to come out, but never excessive force.

    I canít understand the aversion to using naked flames on jobs like this, I have a gas micro- burner that by concidence I used this morning, but when I had a gas hob in the kitchen I often used that, the trick is to let the tip of the flame play on the item for literally 2 seconds, then get a screwdriver on the screw before it cools down. Wear a leather glove, thatíll prevent burnt fingers. A soldering iron is an alternative but the gas flame is much quicker.

    Heating stainless steel excessively will cause it to discolour and eventually turn blue, but a quick flash in a flame wonít cause this.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Really canít recommend this, if the screws are too tight to come out with reasonable finger pressure by applying extra leverage you run a very real risk if shearing the head off the screw or breaking the threads and then youíve got real problems! I think youíve been lucky to avoid this. Some bracelets have the screwed end of the link threaded into a blind hole and you really donít want to break these screws, Rolex owners take note. Mole grips on screwdrivers is ideal for very tight woodscrews, I use this technique, but it really doesnít translate well to small- scale such as watch bracelets. Bracelet screws are small and brittle, if they wonít come out with moderate force apply some heat. If its an old watch thereís a risk the screws are corroded and theyíll need heat and penetrating oil to come out, but never excessive force.

    I canít understand the aversion to using naked flames on jobs like this, I have a gas micro- burner that by concidence I used this morning, but when I had a gas hob in the kitchen I often used that, the trick is to let the tip of the flame play on the item for literally 2 seconds, then get a screwdriver on the screw before it cools down. Wear a leather glove, thatíll prevent burnt fingers. A soldering iron is an alternative but the gas flame is much quicker.

    Heating stainless steel excessively will cause it to discolour and eventually turn blue, but a quick flash in a flame wonít cause this.
    Sorry... won't do it again. :-(

    I did use boiling water on the link first of all.

    I'll be honest I was worried that I might end up discolouring the steel and, point b), no one at work had a lighter, and we don't have a gas hob at home. I suppose I could have used the plumbing torch but a little OTT ;-)

    tbh, now I think about it, I could have used a soldering iron which we DO have at work.

    Lesson learnt :-)

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