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Thread: Work - how old is 'too old'.

  1. #101
    Iím aiming to retire around 60. I enjoy work and have a lot of variety. Iím in my 40ís and have been a civil servant since I was 19 and am lucky to have a decent chunk in a FS pension scheme, although that has changed now.

  2. #102
    I donít think thereís a right age, I think itís down to profession and health. My business partner is a few years older than me at 51 and plans to retire at 60, weíll clearly have to find someone to buy his share of the business when the time comes but hopefully if things go to plan weíll sell the entire business and Iíll call it a day at the same time. The thought of scrabbling around under dirty Land Rovers at 65 doesnít do a lot for me.

  3. #103
    Grand Master snowman's Avatar
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    I've worked in IT all my working life.

    Even when I first started out, you'd hear claims that computers would soon mean we'd not have to work past 50 and would have huge amounts of leisure time.

    Hasn't worked out that way.

    In fact, a constant complaint I hear now is that with everything online, people have back to back meetings from 8 to 6 or even later with no breaks between them at all (not realistic, I know, but certainly people aren't getting decent breaks for lunch).

    I'm lucky, I more or less work part time and definitely decide (most of the time) when to work and when not to, but the treadmill seems worse today than when I started work.

    My father retired on a good, final-salary pension at 60 (after 'winding down' with reducing hours over the previous 12 months) - There's zero chance of me being able to do that next year and I'm probably in a better position financially than the majority of the workforce (if not exactly top 5%!).

    I guess what you expect of 'retirement' depends on when you would want to and feel you could afford to do it, I'm pretty sure I couldn't afford to fill my days with interesting things on whatever pension I might get right now - Having a job actually helps fill the time, with the bonus of bringing in some income.

    A friend of mine did pretty well for himself and retired at 50, but I wonder what he finds to do with his days...

    M
    Last edited by snowman; 12th June 2021 at 14:53.
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  4. #104
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    When you don't enjoy it any more, stop! That doesn't just apply to work. I have changed career three times in my life and enjoyed the change each time. I fully retired at 69 and thoroughly enjoy that too (when the sun shines!).

  5. #105
    Grand Master MartynJC (UK)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowman View Post
    ... but I wonder what he finds to do with his days...

    M
    You'd be surprised what a long list of chores I have from my "better half". Life doesn't stop when you clock off from the treadmill, there now seems endless other things to fill the time. I must say it is fantastic! (My working life has always been it Tech too btw)

    "Time is an illusion, lunchtime doubly soĒ. HHGTTG


  6. #106
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    So what you thinking Ryan - possible forward planning?

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartynJC (UK) View Post
    You'd be surprised what a long list of chores I have from my "better half". Life doesn't stop when you clock off from the treadmill, there now seems endless other things to fill the time. I must say it is fantastic! (My working life has always been it Tech too btw)
    My experience is the same Martyn - I do not miss work at all.
    When you look long into an abyss, the abyss looks long into you.........

  8. #108
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
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    My mom worked at an upscale jewelry store adjacent to a large department store. They had a "retirement" party for this saleslady who had worked there for 85 years - since she was 15!

  9. #109
    Master sish101's Avatar
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    I am very much enjoying this thread (and Martyn's earlier 'Early Retirement' thread). It's helping me to consider my options.

    As I mentioned previously in this post, I've been permanently employed since leaving college and feel there is a certain stoicism with your fellow workers, to a degree everyone is in the same boat as we all graft away (some, admittedly, graft more than others).

    For the last 20+ years, I have been fortunate to work with some great people, until a recent reorganization at work we had a very close supportive team. We delivered projects in many locations around the world to tight deadlines, with the working side extending into the social side and we've been to many of each others weddings, christenings, house warmings, birthdays etc).

    So that leads me to a question : for those of you who have retired, do you miss being part of something bigger?

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  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacifichrono View Post
    My mom worked at an upscale jewelry store adjacent to a large department store. They had a "retirement" party for this saleslady who had worked there for 85 years - since she was 15!
    America seems to be totally different, for some reason all my American friends have no thoughts of retiring at all. A few of them are very wealthy but can't think of retiring for some reason....

    Cheers,

    Adam.

  11. #111

    Work - how old is 'too old'.

    Iím 52 and honestly feel no less energised physically or mentally now than I was at 32 - I enjoy my job, I like my colleagues and the banter , need a challenge and never allow myself to get too stressed or work silly hours. This thread has surprised me as I still consider myself relatively young, and the prospect of retiring feels like something old people do. My own father retired at 50 and I know he thinks it was a bit early in hindsight, regardless of the fact he could financially afford to. I canít imagine being in my 30ís and looking forward to retiring. I rather like my work/life balance. This aim of being in your 30ís and looking forward to retiring at 50 never occurred to me and still hasnít - Iíll continue to work whilst I enjoy it, and I canít see that changing for at least another 10-15 years, regardless of financial circumstances so long as Iím fit and healthy


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    Last edited by RobDad; 12th June 2021 at 21:57.

  12. #112
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    Obviously it's different for different people, depending on the person and the job. So you need to go with what suits you. Many people have little choice but to carry on working in some capacity or other. so it's a nice dilemma to have.

    I've recently been made redundant after 17 years at the same firm, and can afford to live without working for a couple of years at least but can't quite afford to retire yet as I have a soon to be 9 year old daughter.

    I have been enjoying my practice retirement and I still do a 'to do' list every day but with things I want doing which is more satisfying. I've lost weight and am fitter than while working as I get out most days for a decent walk. If you miss the people part of working there is no shortage of voluntary activities that can give you that. Plenty of people in the same boat.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by sish101 View Post
    So that leads me to a question : for those of you who have retired, do you miss being part of something bigger?

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    I retired just under two years ago at 53, and no, I dont miss being part of something bigger. I am now experiencing something bigger, my life and my time to myself, rather than selling 8+ hours of my life every day for a wage. Worth thinking about.
    Last edited by Ruggertech; 13th June 2021 at 00:27.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by ELD1970 View Post
    Been a service engineer all my life, work a lot of weekends and cover night rotas. Quite enjoy it to be honest but dislike all the corporate side of it and attempts to micro manage people.
    Since getting a dog last October and slowing down a bit due to lockdown etc I could quite happily retire at 55…..I’m 51 now and fortunately it could be financially possible.
    Will I get bored…quite possibly but I’ll give it a go and see what happens.
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    52 in a few days time - field service in semiconductor capitol equipment then medical imaging kit. got bored sometime in my 40's - too much foreign travel with endless airports and hotels. got my self a bit together at 40 had already stopped smoking and lost a bit of weight. Finally got out of that 2 years ago. meself and the ball & chain downsized and relocated to scotland (her birthplace). she is retired having got a few bob coming in from nursing and teaching pensions. we were mortgage free ,just, when we moved with some savings.

    i now do agency work - the pay is pretty rubbish but I only need to work 3 or 4 days a week - zero stress - its somewhat physical but i am fitter now than i have been in years - am effectively being paid to go to the gym.

    having completed 51 weeks of a 38 week contract i did plan to take the summer off - i lasted less than two months and have gone back to something with a rolling contract which as i say give me loads of time off ...

    its horses for courses i reckon - here end'th the ramble...

    i consider this partial retirement - i reckon it'll be good for a decade or 2 ...


    Quote Originally Posted by tixntox View Post
    When you don't enjoy it any more, stop! That doesn't just apply to work. I have changed career three times in my life and enjoyed the change each time. I fully retired at 69 and thoroughly enjoy that too (when the sun shines!).
    what he said !
    Last edited by bigbaddes; 13th June 2021 at 16:02.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by sish101 View Post
    I am very much enjoying this thread (and Martyn's earlier 'Early Retirement' thread).

    So that leads me to a question : for those of you who have retired, do you miss being part of something bigger?

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
    Enjoying this thread too, along with Martynís retirement thread.

    Being part of something bigger is fine until the bigger thing decides it doesnít need you any more. Then you realise how one-sided it is.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambam View Post
    Enjoying this thread too, along with Martynís retirement thread.

    Being part of something bigger is fine until the bigger thing decides it doesnít need you any more. Then you realise how one-sided it is.
    I retired 18 months ago at 54 and I'm loving life.
    I'm really glad my company wanted to get rid of the olduns as they offered 18 months pay to say goodbye. Ironically the only time I set my alarm now is on a Saturday morning to meet up with my cycling club.

  17. #117
    Master sish101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bambam View Post
    Enjoying this thread too, along with Martynís retirement thread.

    Being part of something bigger is fine until the bigger thing decides it doesnít need you any more. Then you realise how one-sided it is.
    Any dewey-eyed view of corporate employment went years ago. I've witnessed many an axe fall on long-standing and dedicated employees due to reorganization, the last was only a few months ago when four people were 'let go' with a week's notice. Sadly it wasn't in my immediate business area, otherwise I'd have snapped their hands off.

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  18. #118
    I know of a couple of people who took early retirement.

    Didn't last long. Just being together at home so much was so novel and hard - that they took on second careers.

    I asked them what?

    Gravediggers, they replied.

    ;)

  19. #119
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    I work with a few who can retire comfortably and the sad thing I notice is they have nothing else apart from work. One has some ppl in his family who have lived to 100 and thinks that automatically applies to him some how, divorced many years ago and focused on work since, daughters still sponging off them and work is probably their most social part of the day. Iím 35 and when I hear ppl say ďI donít know what Iíd do if I retireĒ depresses the fuck out of me. Clearly not sat down and actually evaluated life and their one time at it! Especially when they have more than enough money to do so.

  20. #120
    Master RogDen's Avatar
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    I retired about 2, 1/2 years ago at 61 after 43 years service ( 38 on shifts) with a FS pension from a certain Helicopter manufacturer.
    Donít miss it at all I sometimes wonder how I ever had time to go work


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  21. #121
    Grand Master snowman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartynJC (UK) View Post
    You'd be surprised what a long list of chores I have from my "better half". Life doesn't stop when you clock off from the treadmill, there now seems endless other things to fill the time. I must say it is fantastic! (My working life has always been it Tech too btw)
    I guess those 'chores' are part of the reason I see little appeal in retirement just yet!

    My friend quite quickly returned to doing consultancy work - As I know he doesn't need the money, I guess he found that there wasn't enough interesting stuff to do to fill the days.

    If I had a large pot of cash, for sure I'd stop working and spend most of the year skiing, diving or visiting places I haven't yet been, but I'll never be in that position, so I'm happy to carry on working (to some degree) for the next few years while I can still pay the bills with it and let the pension pot build up a little more.

    I've never been a 'live to work' type, but I'm practical enough to know that retirement at an early age wouldn't have been a joy for me.

    I have, though, a massive collection of unread books that will be consumed once I do jack it in for good.

    M
    Breitling Cosmonaute 809 - What's not to like?

  22. #122
    Master sish101's Avatar
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    https://www.nlfm.co.uk/blog-post/ret...2021-or-beyond

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  23. #123
    Iím 56 and retired at 52. Frankly I was bored and felt rudderless. So Iím demolishimg my house and rebuilding it into something cool, which should occupy me for a bit. But to be honest, I should have moved companies and renewed my sense of purpose.

  24. #124
    I volunteer with chaps on the railway who are late seventies and still working/volunteering. Inspirational people. Keep busy, keep active.

  25. #125
    Master Wolfie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sish101 View Post
    You'd be hard pushed at 60 to wear full BA and climb up the ladder, let alone sling anyone over your shoulder and carry them to safety.

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    Im having a huge house renovation and the builders Dad is my brickyÖ. Heís 68 is a proper craftsman and graftsÖ. Maybe an exception? Heíd chuck anyone on this thread over his shoulder

  26. #126
    I’m not sure there is an age, job sector dependent of course - you’re not going to get too many manual labourers in their 70’s, but I know a few electricians and joiners who are.

    I went part-time a good few years ago, and apart from a busy 18 months helping sort out a company and getting it ready for sale, I still had and still have a shorter week.

    Frankly, I’m not sure what else I would do. Unless I had substantially more money tucked away or coming in, and a partner who was also retired to spend that time with, for the most part I’d prefer to have the routine and relative freedom that I have now.

    Generally with a few exceptions, like a busy quarter-end, or when there are staff being replaced. I work between 2.5 to 4 days a week for 40 weeks of the year depending on how busy things are at any given time. 1 or 2 of those days are usually from home. All my clients offices are within a 10-15 minute drive away.

    I think retirement to me would look something like reducing the number of clients; or the level of support provided to existing clients; or possibly being even more selective in relation to the companies I engage with.

    I’m really not counting on a day when I hang it all up for good, but who knows what’s around the corner and maybe I’ll retire, sell up and travel around the world until the funds run out (could be a fun 18 months lol) ;)
    It's just a matter of time...

  27. #127
    Grand Master snowman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catch21 View Post
    I volunteer with chaps on the railway who are late seventies and still working/volunteering. Inspirational people. Keep busy, keep active.
    Indeed, a lot of people trade paid work for voluntary, which keeps a lot of things going.

    M
    Breitling Cosmonaute 809 - What's not to like?

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