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Thread: Starter fountain pen

  1. #51
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick P View Post
    Conway Stewart was "relaunched" a couple of years ago.

    The 1950s models are no where near the price you quoted and it would be hard to beat their quality.
    Yes I meant the modern pens are £500 plus so I was wondering if it is the same company with same production line but as you said the brand is relaunched so probably not. Ditto Onoto

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Gyp View Post
    I've had several fountain pens over the years and the only one that has stood the test of time and remained steadfastly in my pocket is a humble Lamy Safari.

    OK, it's brightly coloured plastic rather than exotic finishes but it's nice to write with and most important of all, always works the moment I get it out; something I could never say for some of the more expensive pens I've owned.



    Nib is Medium, many other colours are available but mine is easy to find when I put it down.

    And in your pocket for less than £20 :-)
    This!
    Agree 100%, everyone who sees it and asks about it loves it too...

  3. #53
    I haven't actually tried a Lamy Safari fountain pen, but they're probably excellent. The rollerball is absolutely the best you can buy and it's only about £50.

    Having had quite a few fountain pens, I would have to say if I could only have one for around OP's budget, it would be anything with a Bock titanium nib. I've got a Namisu pen with one of those and it's far better than many pens costing 3x as much. Then it's just a question of finding a body that's comfortable, the right weight. and suits how you hold your pen.

    Apparently TWSBI will accept these nibs, but you'd need to put some research into getting the correct size etc. I'd say TWSBI is probably the best value starter pen overall and you can always upgrade the nib later. A decent steel nib such as the ones that come in a TWSBI or most entry-level fountain pens will generally work well after it's run in, but that will take a few months, so you need to be patient. My first fountain pen was a Parker Sonnet and I have another identical one I was given as a gift. The difference between the run-in one and the hardly-used one is huge, so when people talk about this, they're not imagining it.

    Namisu make some nice pens and will supply titanium nibs (although annoyingly they no longer offer it as an option on the pen - you have to buy an extra nib, but at least it's guaranteed to be the correct size). Being a micrbrand are a bit more unusual than the typical Parker, Pelikan, Watermans, Lamy, etc. They have sales frequently, but you have to like the minimalist, weighty machined metal aesthetic they go for. Especially as most of them have nothing to stop them rolling off a table or any way to post the cap should you wish to, although they have some newer models that cover these bases as well.

    The TWSBI 580 is just well-designed all around, nicely balanced size & weight, looks great, and doesn't cost much.

    Those would be my recommendations: TWSBI if you want something you can upgrade, fiddle around with easily if/when you want to, and will "just work" out of the box. Or Namisu if you want something that looks like it cost a lot more than it did, feels weighty, and will make people ask "what's that pen you have?" To be fair people will probably ask about the TWSBI too, especially if you go with the 580 and not one of the more boring "classic" or "precision" models. But I suppose you could compare the difference in aesthetic to Damasko vs G-Shock.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Daveya. View Post
    ... have discovered my hand writing is awful, through lack of use.
    Something I should add is that I find writing with a fountain pen really improves my handwriting, especially if the nib has a bit of flex in it. This carries across into writing with other pens, although it gradually reverts to unreadable scrawl over time. I don't find using a larger nib helps at all: it's more about the feedback from the flex and the ability to control the line thickness that really forces my dexterity to improve, without much conscious effort on my part.

    That one of the reasons I really like the Bock titanium nib: it has a nice amount of flex and good flow, without being super inky. The Visconti Homo Sapiens is an incredible pen, one of my absolute favourites and with a very flexible and responsive nib. But I hardly ever use it, because it requires really thick, high quality paper (i.e., not Moleskine!). Otherwise it just turns into fibrous ink soup.

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    My experience with Visconti is with the Homo Sapiens range. Utterly phenomenal pen. I had the bronze age version.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    I have one from that range and one from their entry level range (Van Gough). In reference to someone above the VG is a steel nib it however is such a smooth writer I canít help but be impressed with it I certainly found it to be better than others I have tried costing far more.

    I think what also impressed me was the nib did not dry up even after a few days without use a problem I constantly found with other brands (Lamy for example).

    I have a few Japanese pens I know Sailor are supposed to be another brand far better than their competitors but never got around to trying them out.

  6. #56
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    If you like a larger pen, I'm a big fan of the Cross Townsend. Price varies but usually starts from about £120 upwards depending on model.

    I find them incredibly smooth to write with straight away. Even ink flow.

    The Cross site frequently have discounts, also check out the clearance section of the website.

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by paule23 View Post
    If you like a larger pen, I'm a big fan of the Cross Townsend. Price varies but usually starts from about £120 upwards depending on model.

    I find them incredibly smooth to write with straight away. Even ink flow.

    The Cross site frequently have discounts, also check out the clearance section of the website.
    Cross are another good brand, even their other pens are excellent quality a very overlooked brand.

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by paule23 View Post
    If you like a larger pen, I'm a big fan of the Cross Townsend.
    I'm not sure I'd call the Cross Townsend a larger pen. It's relatively slim by fountain pen standards. It's about 2cm longer than the Parker Sonnet (another smaller pen), but most of that is cap, which is also quite large and heavy compared to the body of the pen. Hence posting or not massively changes how it balances (which can be a pro or a con depending on how you look at it).

    Personally, I don't think the Townsend is all that great. It's just OK. Over time I've found the Parker Sonnet to be more reliable and it was about half the price of the Townsend. The fit & finish of the Cross is marginally better. But then again, it's not remotely in the same league as a Parker Premier, which can occasionally be found on sale for about the same price (admittedly not at the same price as the Townsend when it's also on sale).

  9. #59
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    The Lamy 2000 was a good choice. I have 3 left of the 5 I have had. Two went missing. No messing about with expensive catridges. The pen is made out of Makrolon, the same material the plates in bulletproof jackets are made from, so is tough stuff. Enjoy. You and the pen could spend a lifetime together. Of all the pens I could choose from, my Lamy 2000 is the one that is with me all of the time.
    Last edited by Templogin; 24th May 2021 at 12:11.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Templogin View Post
    The Lamy 200 was a good choice.
    Oops, I missed that OP had already gone ahead and bought one of those. Saw lots of recommendations for Lamy, but missed that.

    This has got me thinking about the fact I still don't have a Lamy 2000 fountain pen yet...

  11. #61
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    From what I read fountain pens are making a comeback with sales increasing. Something about analog life is very appealing.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  12. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    From what I read fountain pens are making a comeback with sales increasing. Something about analog life is very appealing.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    I think it might be to do with homeworking , although I think the actual numbers working from home permanently is probably over stated in the news . And the fact the desk at home is static. No desking, no packing stuff up worrying about ink leaks

    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk

  13. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    From what I read fountain pens are making a comeback with sales increasing. Something about analog life is very appealing.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    Itís probably similar to mechanical watches, no matter how far technology goes people do still like traditional things.

    A lot of the brands mentioned do also make very good rollerball pens that are a pleasure to use.

  14. #64
    Interesting thread, and yet another expensive rabbit hole to disappear down.

    I havenít used a fountain pen since my school days, but a Lamy Safari is in the post for me.

    Iíd appreciate the thoughts, please, of those with more knowledge (i.e. everyone) re the Platinum Izumo Tagayasan - pic below courtesy of ĎThe Nibsmithí.

    With the current ĎCult Pensí 15% offer, itís available for £357 delivered. I like that itís not recognisable / ostentatious when out with clients, and what really attracts me is the element of Japanese craftsmanship: the hand-made Bombay Blackwood barrel, the 18ct nib and - most especially - the Urushi lacquer.

    My question is, am I overlooking anything else of comparable or better quality in this sub-£400 bracket? Am I falling for the romance of a Japanese master hand-working this when it could be sprayed-on lacquer via a production line for all I know? Thanks in advance.



  15. #65
    Loving the Lamy 2000

    Ingenious way of filling the pen, almost like magic

    Have a Safari on the way from eBay for a tenner to compare

    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk

  16. #66
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    It's a nice looking pen Stringer, with a quality nib. I like your style in respect to the attraction being not recognisable or ostentatious. Regarding the way the lacquer is applied, I wouldn't be too worried. I remember, some time ago, a confectionary manufacturer and vendor telling me that the best thing about her products were that they were handmade, as she proffered a selection tray of that days' production towards me. I savoured a piece and responded, "oh yes, they taste so handmade". I think that the irony was lost on her. The taste was the important thing.

    For some reason I have never owned a Platinum fountain pen, but they are well regarded. There is no substitute for trying a pen out though, although most of mine have been bought without stepping inside a shop.

    If I could recommend these three, or similar in their ranges:

    https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/GV13695...tain-pen-ebony

    This is also available other wood finishes, but is above the current budget. Superb pens, and not many would have an idea of what they are. I lust after one, but haven't bought one yet. Cartridge/convertor.

    https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/PK05146...tain-pen-black

    I have one of these and it is a superb pen. Writes well, stylish but goes under the radar. Piston filler.

    https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/SR60941...h-rhodium-trim

    I have one of these too. Japanese manufacturer. Another superb pen in my collection. The smoothest nib that I have. Classic cigar shape. Cartridge/convertor.

    https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/SR83260...th-silver-trim

    Similar to the above, but even better with a piston filler.
    Last edited by Templogin; 25th May 2021 at 19:36. Reason: Additional Info

  17. #67
    Master TheGent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveya. View Post
    Loving the Lamy 2000

    Ingenious way of filling the pen, almost like magic

    Have a Safari on the way from eBay for a tenner to compare

    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
    Great news. The filling mechanism is simple yet brilliant isnít it?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGent View Post
    Great news. The filling mechanism is simple yet brilliant isnít it?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    It's weird, I thought I'd bought a pen without innards or something, pen doesn't come with instructions , so Googled it and watched a You tube in amazement , as you just stick it in and turn the end one way then the other and bingo

    Very clever

    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk

  19. #69
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    It's just a cartridge convertor on a bigger scale. Able to hold much more ink, so less trips to the ink bottle. All pens should be made that way.

  20. #70
    Craftsman Barry's Avatar
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    Lamy Safari as many have said, great to start with, as with any pen keep it close, they go missing in a heartbeat.

    A Sailor 1911 my current go to pen and they are very very nice.

    Enjoy, they are lovely to use.


  21. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Stringer View Post
    Interesting thread, and yet another expensive rabbit hole to disappear down.

    I havenít used a fountain pen since my school days, but a Lamy Safari is in the post for me.

    Iíd appreciate the thoughts, please, of those with more knowledge (i.e. everyone) re the Platinum Izumo Tagayasan - pic below courtesy of ĎThe Nibsmithí.

    With the current ĎCult Pensí 15% offer, itís available for £357 delivered. I like that itís not recognisable / ostentatious when out with clients, and what really attracts me is the element of Japanese craftsmanship: the hand-made Bombay Blackwood barrel, the 18ct nib and - most especially - the Urushi lacquer.

    My question is, am I overlooking anything else of comparable or better quality in this sub-£400 bracket? Am I falling for the romance of a Japanese master hand-working this when it could be sprayed-on lacquer via a production line for all I know? Thanks in advance.


    I have a Platinum Izumo green Urushi pen. It is by far the best pen I have. The nib is wonderful to write with. The Izumo line owes a lot to the more expensive Nagaya stablemates than the cheaper Platinum pens. I donít think you can get better value for money than these pens.

  22. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Lamy Safari as many have said, great to start with, as with any pen keep it close, they go missing in a heartbeat.
    That's part of the logic of me buying a yellow one - very conspicuous!

  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by Gyp View Post
    That's part of the logic of me buying a yellow one - very conspicuous!
    And the reason I bought 2

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Stringer View Post
    Looks ace. Make sure you like, or can tolerate, both the step in the barrel and the metal band at the top of the section.

  25. #75
    A couple of mentions to a feature that is a make or break: ink flow. Iíve tried many pens over the years, many already mentioned, but most have had ink flow far too fast for me.

    Then thereís the choice of paper. Japanese paper is typically smooth, and something special. But add in a fast flowing pen and my writing is a disaster. Iíve moved to Kraft paper. The texture, along with a fine nib, suit my writing.

    Kaweco had a mention earlier. They are quite superb, and are typical German engineering.

    TWSBI have fine nibs and at a very modest price. Having an unusual colour ink in a demonstrator is always interesting. The odd crack in the barrel gives a little concern, so theyíre home pens only.

    The new Parker 51, as already mentioned, is a massive disappointment. Feels and writes nothing like the original. Itís a remodeled Vector at 2.5 times the price.

    Goulet Pens on YouTube is a great resource for information.

  26. #76
    Yeah I've just ordered a new notebook with recommended paper as I'm using one from Morrisons , lol, glad I'm not saying that in a pen forum

    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk

  27. #77
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    I'm sad to hear your opinion of the 51s. The originals really are superb to write with. A case of living on past glories perhaps?

  28. #78
    Master
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    I like fountain pens and have picked up a few over the years which I still have - Cross/Sheaffer/Mont Blanc etc , but mostly Parkers, 4 or 5 of which are old 51s(my favs)

    I would like to try some of the ones mentioned on here to see how they compare to the 51s

  29. #79
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    Had something understated and below the radar arrive yesterday.....

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  30. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    Had something understated and below the radar arrive yesterday.....

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    Congrats Ryan I love that! I looked at the same Maki-e model a year or two back, Platinum I think..?
    What are your first impressions?
    Dan

  31. #81
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANH View Post
    Congrats Ryan I love that! I looked at the same Maki-e model a year or two back, Platinum I think..?
    What are your first impressions?
    Dan
    Worth every penny. Looks superb in hand and the usual silky smooth 3776 nib (I went broad).

    Another recent arrival that I thought was a heck of a lot of pen for the money is the Esterbrook Estie re-release. Here is mine below;

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  32. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    Worth every penny. Looks superb in hand and the usual silky smooth 3776 nib (I went broad).

    Another recent arrival that I thought was a heck of a lot of pen for the money is the Esterbrook Estie re-release. Here is mine below;

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    Nice, interesting the hear about the Estie Iíve wondered about getting the red version at some point as does seem comparatively good value on paper, definitely looks the part too

  33. #83
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DANH View Post
    Nice, interesting the hear about the Estie Iíve wondered about getting the red version at some point as does seem comparatively good value on paper, definitely looks the part too
    I have a Nakaya Dorsal Fin 2 Heki-Tamenuri on order to arrive 'one day'. That'll be me done for a while. TBH compared to watches there's a lot more craftsmanship gone into some pens.

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  34. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    I have a Nakaya Dorsal Fin 2 Heki-Tamenuri on order to arrive 'one day'. That'll be me done for a while. TBH compared to watches there's a lot more craftsmanship gone into some pens.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    Hi Ryan. Any chance of a picture or two of your fountain pen collection? Your two incomings are most impressive.

  35. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    I have a Nakaya Dorsal Fin 2 Heki-Tamenuri on order to arrive 'one day'. That'll be me done for a while. TBH compared to watches there's a lot more craftsmanship gone into some pens.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    Totally agree, some are works of art. Most I could stretch to was a Wancher Urushi ebonite dream pen which (name aside) I love. Bet you canít wait for the dorsal fin, pure class.

  36. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveya. View Post
    Now working from home permanently, I write quite a bit, notes I need to refer back to, and have discovered my hand writing is awful, through lack of use.

    Would like to slow down and write properly so I can read what I've written lol, and get some enjoyment from writing

    What's a good pen to get, new or second hand , budget 150 ish

    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
    As many have said, canít go wrong with the Lamy Safari (plastic) / AlStar (aluminium) / Vista (clear body) - buy a few and have a range of nibs as theyíre dead easy to swap.

    Iíve had all sorts ( TWSBI, Namiki etc) and sold them for a modest range of Lamy Vistas with F to 1.9 nibs all with converters.

    The other vital components: ink and paper.

    Ink: Diamine Bilberry or Majestic for great sheen, Sapphire or Sargasso for great colour.

    Paper: Oxford Optik 90gsm. Any ink with character will come alive on Optik paper. Iíve used pricey 140gsm custom notebooks and theyíve killed a great sheeny ink stone dead.



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  37. #87
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    For many years I have been using the Parker Cisele Sterling Silver that my father passed down to me and I absolutely love it. Classic and elegant, nicely weighted.

    I have since moved from their fountain pen to their roller ball more regularly which I find immensely better (perhaps controversially). I have 2 of each now I think.

    You can get them for a reasonable amount on the Bay:

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PARKER-CI....m46890.l49286

    Photo is of mine on my desk right now.

    Best of luck in your search.PXL_20210527_111218393.jpg

  38. #88
    Craftsman smashie's Avatar
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    The three I use the most, I've got several safaris and a few Kaweco Sports. The brass sport is my favourite because I like a heavy pen. The Visconti Van Gogh is for when I'm sat in the office all day.


  39. #89
    No love for Caran díache?
    I use the 849 ball points every day and the 849 fountain pens are cheap fun.

  40. #90
    Thank you to everyone who took the time to reply to my query - normally I like to research & puzzle things out for myself, but this shows how consulting the TZ-UK 'hive mind' can be very helpful and provide some great suggestions.

    I'm very much still stalking a few pricier Lamy & Platinum options with intent, but the replies have persuaded me to read a bit wider.

    Quote Originally Posted by Templogin View Post
    It's a nice looking pen Stringer, with a quality nib. I like your style in respect to the attraction being not recognisable or ostentatious. Regarding the way the lacquer is applied, I wouldn't be too worried.

    For some reason I have never owned a Platinum fountain pen, but they are well regarded. There is no substitute for trying a pen out though, although most of mine have been bought without stepping inside a shop.
    Thanks for the very detailed reply and the suggestions.

    That Graf von Faber-Castell in Ebony is a pure work of art. The Sailors are handsome pens too, I'd be very happy with any of them.

    Re the Izumo lacquer, it's interesting - Cult Pens and several other retailers, plus most reviewers, refer to it as Urushi, but having delved into the Japan home website for Platinum, their catalogue and some forums, it transpires that it's not actually Urushi, but just plain old urethane. I'm sure it's very well done, and your point re 'handmade' is a very valid one, but that puts me off the Tagayasan a bit. Guess I'm buying with heart as much as mind (not dissimilar to watches, really).

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Lamy Safari as many have said, great to start with, as with any pen keep it close, they go missing in a heartbeat.

    A Sailor 1911 my current go to pen and they are very very nice.

    Enjoy, they are lovely to use.
    Cheers, the Sailor 1911 looks great.

    A Lamy Safari is sitting beside me, having been acquired second-hand - love the fun colour, and the German, Bauhaus influence on design makes it so much more than 'just' a plastic pen. Really enjoying it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Lee View Post
    I have a Platinum Izumo green Urushi pen. It is by far the best pen I have. The nib is wonderful to write with. The Izumo line owes a lot to the more expensive Nagaya stablemates than the cheaper Platinum pens. I don’t think you can get better value for money than these pens.
    It's reassuring to have this kind of owner feedback - where I live there's very little chance of trying before I buy.

    Given the confusion over the Tagayasan being urethane coated, not Urushi, the Platinum Izumo Urushi will be on my shortlist to buy in red or green. The Urushi effect is gorgeous, with the nicely graduated & exposed subtle flashes of colour. A 'worn' look that perhaps chimes with that other Japanese aesthetic, wabi-sabi, or akin to patina on watches. Fantastic.

    Quote Originally Posted by JGJG View Post
    Looks ace. Make sure you like, or can tolerate, both the step in the barrel and the metal band at the top of the section
    Good point, thanks. Not sure I'll be able to try before I buy, but definitely something to ponder - how the pen feels in hand has to be of paramount importance.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldHooky View Post
    Then there’s the choice of paper. Japanese paper is typically smooth, and something special. But add in a fast flowing pen and my writing is a disaster. I’ve moved to Kraft paper. The texture, along with a fine nib, suit my writing.

    Kaweco had a mention earlier. They are quite superb, and are typical German engineering.
    Paper!! Yet, another wormhole to lose myself in... But that's all part of the fun, isn't it. Thanks for the suggestions.

  41. #91
    The Lamy 2000 with medium nib is working really well for me, writing slower, neater and can read what I've written

    Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk

  42. #92
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    As a PSA this is a ltd edition Esterbrook

    https://www.cultpens.com/i/q/EB86669...imited-edition

    10% discount will be applied automatically as there is a promo on Esterbrook.

    Then use the promo code PENFRIENDSUK10 and a further 10% off will be given.

    A lot of pen for the money that is

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  43. #93
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    Has Platinum 3776 been mentioned? Good, fat pen. Has a rubber seal which stops the ink from drying. Buy with a medium nib.
    A Pilot vanishing point is something to look at as well.

  44. #94
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    I remember learning to write with an italic nib at school, mid 60s -70s, since when I've mostly used fountain pens. I'm sure it helped me with not only writing, but thinking about what I was writing. I work in Italy at the moment and Italian students write as if they're training to be doctors. Maybe 5% of my students enjoy writing, with the majority asking why they need to write. They do have a point, texting, e-mails cover most of their needs. Nearly all have never written or received a thank you letter or a post card, but when asked which they would prefer to receive, text or letter, all say letter. The constant testing of students and the need to complete the set work stops teachers and students spending a little more time on learning how to write. It's a real pity.

  45. #95
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    MrsV is a big fountain pen-ner and I have a few.
    My favourite of hers is the Waldmann commander. It's fabulous. Sterling silver and hand enamelled. Writes like a dream.
    Reasonably budget at 275.

    https://www.executivepensdirect.com/...YaAoEcEALw_wcB

  46. #96
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    Cracking price for the Visconti Homo Sapiens Fountain pen

    https://www.penbox.co.uk/homo.sapiens.htm

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  47. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    Cracking price for the Visconti Homo Sapiens Fountain pen

    https://www.penbox.co.uk/homo.sapiens.htm

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    They are VERY well priced as are the earlier models with the enamelling rather than the laser etched clip.

    I have the Bronze Age and the steel age fountains and theyre smashing. Im after one of the limited edition fountains next or the white lava rollerball. I love the feel and size of them.

    Only have this pic on phone at the moment but this is the steel age.


  48. #98
    Master smalleyboy1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Posts
    1,004
    Just moved from a Lamy Safari (extra fine) to a Pilot Capless (fine). Couldnít fault the Lamy except it was too fine and I found it a bit scratchy. Really enjoying the Capless and after years of roller balls (Rotring for last few years), a fountain pen is a joy. Plus the range of ink colours is a real bonus.

  49. #99
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    11,361
    This artisan is very well regarded and his pens are true works of art

    https://pen.18111.com/pages/sales/etsy%20sale.html

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  50. #100
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North
    Posts
    16,249
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanb741 View Post
    This artisan is very well regarded and his pens are true works of art

    https://pen.18111.com/pages/sales/etsy%20sale.html

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
    Love the golden sakura on bonfire one.

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