closing tag is in template navbar
Time Factors Watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Results 1 to 46 of 46

Thread: Printing a 3D Tourbillion clock... JohnnyE's 3D Printing Fiasco Thread

  1. #1

    Printing a 3D Tourbillion clock... JohnnyE's 3D Printing Fiasco Thread

    So.... 3D printing. Can't be that hard can it? Buy a printer, plug it in, print stuff!

    I thought I'd share my plans here. I want to print my own 3D Tourbillion wall clock. Why? Just because. I work in IT, software side of things... but I'm never happier than when pulling old cars and bikes apart. Surely a curious sort like me could pick up 3D printing easily enough?

    Well... I've taken photos from the arrival of my Chinese 3D printer and will post my findings here in case anyone, like me, has gone a bit daft during lockdown!! If the thread gathers no interest... I'll let it slip away into oblivion, but here we go:

    Is it costly?
    After MANY hours of Youtube videos on the subject, I soon picked up that a brand of printer called a Creality Ender 3 exists. Under £200 delivered - part assembled - looks to be a nicely made bit of kit actually. Comes with loads of tools, some white "filament" to start you off and a LOT of users out there on the internet. I actually spotted that Carl over on GasGasBones tinkers with 3D prints on his Instagram page. Dropped Carl a message - turns out his printer is an Ender. OK.. SOLD! Paypal deal was on and I got the new "V2" printer to my door for £168.



    This "V2" comes with a glass heated print bed which I'm told is a good thing! Helps the print job to stick. So.... time to bolt this all up. The manual is ok but WAY too small. I can barely read it. Youtube to the rescue. I setup my 10" tablet and followed a build video. It took me about an hour but was in iteself rather rewarding to see it rise from my table top:



    What does it use to print with?
    There's varous print medias you can use but the most popular for hobby use is stuff called PLA. It comes in 1kg reels and is 1.75mm in diameter. Once heated to over 200 degrees at the nozzle, it's squeezed through a 0.4mm brass nozzle.

    PLA plastic or polylactic acid is a vegetable-based plastic material, which commonly uses cornstarch as a raw material. ... PLA is a fully biodegradable thermoplastic polymer consisting of renewable raw materials. Among all 3D printing materials, PLA is part of the most popular materials used for additive manufacturing.
    Right.... that's me started. I'll post the next bits if there's interest in learning at my pace with me! This is just lagging a week or so behind real time, so i have NO CLUE at this stage if I'll be able to hit my end goal of a wall clock!

    Speaking of which, this is my inspiration:

    Last edited by JohnnyE; 22nd October 2020 at 21:15.

  2. #2
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Mainly UK
    Posts
    13,749
    Brilliant stuff, John. I'm very much looking forward to your future updates.
    Inform - Educate - Entertain

  3. #3
    Agree, keep posting!

  4. #4
    Looking forward to seeing the progress John. You could have a few orders by the end of this. Put my name on the list for the JohnnyE Series 1 Tourbillon 😀.

  5. #5
    Following with interest!

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  6. #6
    Ah good stuff!! Of course I should have known that watch lovers like mechanical stuff and silly stuff.. so I'll come back to this tomorrow with my first lesson learned!

    Tomorrow's lesson... level your bed (and I'm not talking about THAT bed!)

  7. #7
    Excellent John, I look forward to your progress. If no major hiccups, I'll give it a go too next year!

  8. #8
    Craftsman djjuk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South West UK
    Posts
    717
    And another! Keep updating please.

  9. #9
    Grand Master magirus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Up North hinny
    Posts
    36,799
    I'm looking forward to your progress and results.

  10. #10
    Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    4,577
    Be interested to see how you get on.
    Good luck with it!

  11. #11
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    .
    Posts
    742
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyE View Post
    Ah good stuff!! Of course I should have known that watch lovers like mechanical stuff and silly stuff.. so I'll come back to this tomorrow with my first lesson learned!

    Tomorrow's lesson... level your bed (and I'm not talking about THAT bed!)
    Youíre a monster. Now need to add 3D printer to the expanding list of things this forum has encouraged me to research that will likely result in divorce. In addition to watches the current list includes Hiut Selvedge denim (3 years no washes), Panama Jack boots, sous vide cooker alongside the current Ďneed to haveí BGE...

    Will follow this with interest!

  12. #12
    Craftsman T1ckT0ck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Norwich, Norfolk
    Posts
    700
    This sounds a fantastic project and I will follow it with interest, always fancied giving one a go so this might lead down into the rabbit hole!

  13. #13
    Master Geralt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    1,221
    Good stuff. Best of luck with the project. Watched the video and found I was hunting for the minutes/hours markers. You may want to consider making the indicators a bit bigger or at least different colours. Just a thought...

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Geralt View Post
    Good stuff. Best of luck with the project. Watched the video and found I was hunting for the minutes/hours markers. You may want to consider making the indicators a bit bigger or at least different colours. Just a thought...
    That's a fair point - something contrasting will show up much better. There's a lot of build photos here on the project page where people have changed the colour scheme: https://www.myminifactory.com/object...ription-124938

    Fitting this onto the print bed could spell game over when I start... check out the size of this thing!



    The designer has kindly put the outer piece and the escapament up as free downloads so you can see 1. Does it fit and 2. Is my printer up to the job (quality wise) to make this tick.

    Anyway... I'm getting ahead of myself. Since there's a few above who are interested in trying this themselves, I'll post back later when I've time to show how you get ready for your 1st print. We'll then look at some "issues" you would never have thought about before, like printing stuff at an angle. Plastic can't float in mid air.... so if your design has a ledge/shelf or a piece that curves outward... imagine printing that with only air beneath it!

    I learned some messy lessons and will post the various failed prints soon!....
    Last edited by JohnnyE; 23rd October 2020 at 16:08. Reason: typo

  15. #15
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Somerset (U.k )
    Posts
    11,249
    Blog Entries
    1
    I will definitely be following with interest, love this kind of thing.

    Good luck with the project.
    Cheers,

    Ben



    ..... for I have become the Jedi of flippers


    " an extravagance is anything you buy that is of no earthly use to your wife "

  16. #16
    Master
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,269
    I bought an Ender 3D Pro at the beginning of lockdown.

    You have to build it properly to start with. YouTube will help.

    Itís amazing what you can print though.

    Pete

  17. #17
    Sorry for the slow progress with this one.... a bit of an educational update before we melt plastic!

    Introduction to the main parts and the 3 axis

    These are 3D, and the 3 axis are referred to as the X, Y & Z as shown below:



    In this printer,


    • The "X" axis is powered by a stepper motor pulling/pushing a toothed rubber belt which moves the "hot end" (the bit that prints) across that axis.
    • The "Y" axis in my case is achieved by the glass bed sliding on its axis, again powered by a toothed belt and stepper motor.
    • Finally, the "Z" axis is the up and down. Achieved on this printer by the rotation of a threaded bar that lifts and drops the horizontal gantry.


    The filament pops onto that big handle up top (loosely) and you feed the end through the extruder. This is the device that pushes the filament (and pulls or retracts it) down the white tube and into the "hot end".


    • Typical print temperatures are 200-220 degrees celcius
    • Typical glass bed temperatures are 40-60 degrees celcius


    I had it in my head that these print like a dot matrix ink-jet, only in 3 dimensions. Wrong. The extruder pushes out constantly and lays down small lines of plastic.

    Here's the printer in action - its quite therapeutic to watch as it glides away!



    So, how do you actually find stuff to print and how do you actually print it?

    If like me you are a complete newbie to this, you'll have no hope (yet!) of designing your own stuff. I personally have ZERO experience of 3D CAD applications. Thankfully, there are many download sites where you can download your 3D print projects, already designed and ready to use.

    Two main sites I've used are:


    1. https://www.thingiverse.com/
    2. https://www.myminifactory.com/


    You can get lost in those 2 sites very easily! A world of stuff to download and print. If you are curious and on a Windows 10 PC, go ahead now and download some files. Windows has a 3D file viewer and you can open the shapes, zoom and look a little closer.

    What file formats are these and do I need to buy software?

    The 3D files are .STL files. These are 3D shapes/renders. You can open them in Windows 10 "3D Viewer" and your 3D printer will come with software to open it too. You can also download free slicing software here https://ultimaker.com/software/ultimaker-cura

    You however can't get print these STL files. Your printer needs that 3D shape translated into actual instructions - layer by layer. This process is called "slicing" and you need software to open that STL 3D model and "slice it" into a .gcode file.

    Don't freak out if you aren't overly technical.... let me recap...


    • Download your chosen STL file and save to your PC/laptop
    • Open that file in your slicer software
    • Click "SLICE" and it'll save you a .gcode file
    • Copy the .gcode file to microSD card and pop it in the printer
    • You then print "standalone" as such... no PC involved to actually print.


    That's a lot to take in... I'll take a break at this stage and fire away if there's any questions.

    Next post... we'll start to print stuff!!
    Last edited by JohnnyE; 10th November 2020 at 12:40.

  18. #18
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,982
    Bookmarked for future reference - thank you for posting, OP, it's fascinating stuff!

  19. #19
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    117
    Very interesting, please keep the posts coming!

  20. #20

    Bed levelling - the 1st yet most important step before printing

    This, can make or break you! A level bed is vital to get your 1st layer down right. You have a few options here...

    1. Level it manually, using a piece of a4 paper to get a 0.1mm or so gap from nozzle to bed in all areas
    2. Install an automated levelling upgrade (BLTouch is popular.. about £50)

    I was so keen get printing, I rushed this. Got lucky and the 1st test piece had a small base and worked ok. Print quality was quite amazing - you can hardly see the layers! Excellent for the price point of this machine.





    My 2nd piece, had a large footprint and just didn't adhere. The bed was off and there were good spots and bad spots on that base shape. It not only created a mess (as the nozzle ploughed through layer 1) but I scratched the glass bed with the brass nozzle. Just looks a bit unsightly... no real damage done thankfully.



    So - time to set this bed level correctly. Again, youtube to the rescue. If you want to see how... have a watch at this:



    There are loads of print files on thingyverse to allow you to test your levelling. I use this one: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2789086 It prints 1 layer thick squares in key areas so you can assess the quality rather than kicking off a big job and creating a mess:



    So.... I now have a level bed. I can print stuff!!! Time to up my game a bit. Worth highlighting... these jobs take time... LOTS of it. Its not unusual for a job to run for 10-24 hours which does raise issues for me. I've taken a chance so far... but a 210 degree "hot end" running through the night isnt so smart is it? Also, these basic printers have no "out of filament" detection. You run out... it ploughs on. Best bit there is that you can upgrade them yourself - you have a 3d printer now so you can print your own upgrades! Long term plan for me it to add some kind of monitoring via Raspberry Pi with remote monitoring and control of jobs.

    Well, here's some of my needless printing that has followed.

    Meet "mini Vader"



    Next, I printed off some "self watering plant pots". Two pieces... rather smart actually! Fill up water in the spot, drop your plant section in and you are sorted. Ah. One problem here... PLA is printed like a mesh. Is it waterproof? No!! Water goes everywhere, so I need to work out how to seal the black pots. One for another day...

    Here's the (to be sealed) water container:


    Here's the inner plant pot - print job turned out REALLY nice here:


    ... and the finished articles! I think I need some kind of resin to line them with. We'll see.
    Last edited by JohnnyE; 12th November 2020 at 14:12.

  21. #21
    Now this, blew my mind.

    You can print complex devices, consisting of multiple parts.... in ONE PRINT JOB.

    Here's the print job of a trial piece. I'm trying this for good reason! It has a hairspring in, pivot points and toothed gears! Let's not forget this is a "lets build a tourbillion" thread after all.

    Print job complete - one job, many pieces:


    Here's how it looks when you take it off the bed and click it shut. It's a spring loaded joint:


    The business side:


    Initial thoughts? Its clever... but is this good enough quality to create a working clock? Those gears are a bit rough. Some research later tells me that the tourbillion clock needs finer brass nozzles. I'm on the stock 0.4mm nozzles. We need 0.2mm and tweaked print settings for the clock. That's ok... we'll cross that bridge later then.

    So - to put that "thingy" above in context... lets print a spring loaded box with that sprung gear powering the lid! Remember... THIS IS ONE PRINT JOB. Just one. That fact still impresses me:

    Here's the box printing:



    Its laying on its side as we see the gear mechanism being laid down:



    About 6 hours later... we're done. It only ******* worked!!







    OK. Game on for the clock build now. I've printed enough useless crap.

  22. #22
    Grand Master WORKSIMON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Dreich Scotland
    Posts
    10,913
    Absolutely fantastic thread, I am really enjoying your forays into the 3D printing world, cant wait for the next post !
    Cheers

    Simon



    Ralph Waldo Emerson: We ask for long life, but 'tis deep life, or noble moments that signify. Let the measure of time be spiritual, not mechanical.

  23. #23

    Right.... lets start this tourbillion job!

    Right, enough of printing useless things! I think I've got the hang of the worst of all this, so lets get down to business.

    This tourbillion clock pushes smaller/home 3D printers to the max on 2 fronts:

    1. The base is large - right to the limits of the cheaper printers. My popular Ender 3 will NOT print this base without modification of the printer's firmware. There are "islands" on the allowable print area - to stop your print head hitting the glass retaining clips. I'll have to learn how to edit the firmware and reflash it in to hack my way past this problem.

    2. The quality of printing MUST be good for the moving parts otherwise this thing just won't tick. On reading the build plans, its recommended you use differing brass nozzles for different parts. So... I'll need some 0.2mm nozzles. Standard is 0.4mm. No big deal as these are cheap off eBay, Amazon or specialist suppliers.

    So, after some time on google, I discover how to remove the forbidden areas from my slicing software. On screen, it looks like this WILL fit:



    I set the print temp and bed temp within the slicer software, sliced it, exported to microSD and away we go... not.



    Damn.

    Back to Google. OK.... inside the firmware of the printer, it has physical limits set. I managed to follow a tutorial to show me how to edit and update a custom firmware file. I flashed it into the printer... AND BRICKED IT!!! Yes, black screen of death. Nothing I did made that printer boot up. Oh dear!

    Back to Google!! Familiar huh? Discovered that the supplied microSD has a 2nd, unallocated partition! Wierd. So, into MS Windows disk management, delete all partitions and recreate just ONE simple new partition, taking up 100% of space. Uploaded the firmware ... PERFECT!! It worked. What a quirk!

    Fingers crossed then. I loaded up some black PLA+ (no idea what the + give you but it was on offer on Amazon for £16 a roll). Here we go......



    YES!!!!



    So that's the clock started. It looks like this one will be printing for up to 10 hours, so I'll report back in the morning. Hopefully we wont see a pile of black spaghetti in my next post!

  24. #24
    10 hours into the print and a predicted 9 to go!! Looking rather good though I think. Look closely and you'll see a little bit of stringing has happened, but that'll clean up VERY easily. A certain cleanup is always needed and I have a set of model makers files here from Draper for the job.

    This has been tricky to setup so I think I'll keep the printer busy this week running out a few copies of this base plate (My Dad has one on order for starters and if it turns out good, I'd like to raffle one off for the fundraiser). I'll also weigh the PLA before and after my next print. I've also got a TP Link smart plug with power monitoring. It'll be interesting to see exactly what a part like this costs to make, including electricity costs.



    Last edited by JohnnyE; 16th November 2020 at 12:54.

  25. #25
    I'm finding this rather therapeutic to watch (now I'm over the frustrations of getting it all to work!!!)


  26. #26
    Grand Master WORKSIMON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Dreich Scotland
    Posts
    10,913
    Excellent, you have the patience of a saint !
    Cheers

    Simon



    Ralph Waldo Emerson: We ask for long life, but 'tis deep life, or noble moments that signify. Let the measure of time be spiritual, not mechanical.

  27. #27
    Well, my first big challenge is completed! A finished backplate for the clock:



    Print quality turned out really well. The stacked up print effect almost looks like a brushed finish:



    There's lots of small strings to remove. I'm not sure if I can improve on that via the slicer settings - I'm sure I can. There's loads of settings for "retraction" in there which may stop this overspill. Ever use a silicone gun in the bathroom? You click that button to stop... but the silicone still oozes away. Thats where you need a faster "retraction" in this instance.



    For now, an old skool tidy up via my little Draper files:

    Last edited by JohnnyE; 16th November 2020 at 20:48.

  28. #28
    Craftsman SydR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Lothian.
    Posts
    523
    I have the original Ender 3 (not the V2) and have made numerous changes to it

    1. Turned it into a direct drive printer.
    2. As direct drive adds weight to the X axis I gave it a dual Z leadscrew upgrade.
    3. Fitted a full metal hotend.
    4 Fitted a BL touch
    5 Upgraded to a 32 bit motherboard with silent stepper drivers.
    6 The additional memory on the new motherboard allows for a full set of features on Marlin 2.0 firmware.

    Itís turned a good printer into a great one.

    Since those changes Iíve added a Raspberry Pi 4 with a 4Ē touchscreen running OctoPi to it along with a Pi camera. Currently playing with time-lapse videos.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by SydR View Post
    I have the original Ender 3 (not the V2) and have made numerous changes to it

    1. Turned it into a direct drive printer.
    2. As direct drive adds weight to the X axis I gave it a dual Z leadscrew upgrade.
    3. Fitted a full metal hotend.
    4 Fitted a BL touch
    5 Upgraded to a 32 bit motherboard with silent stepper drivers.
    6 The additional memory on the new motherboard allows for a full set of features on Marlin 2.0 firmware.

    Itís turned a good printer into a great one.

    Since those changes Iíve added a Raspberry Pi 4 with a 4Ē touchscreen running OctoPi to it along with a Pi camera. Currently playing with time-lapse videos.
    That's some serious upgrades! Post up a pic - I'd love to see that. One thing I want to do to mine is relocate the filament spindle. Its in a bad position up there and really needs some kind of bearing assisted setup for smoother spinning.

  30. #30
    I've been filing and edge cleaning. This came up really well. I can see a few bits in these 2 pics that need a touch but I'll continue cleaning it up here and there.





    Clock #2's backplate comes off the printer in a couple of hours time.

    Next will be to print a trial escapement. Here's how that part looks in isolation:



    They recommend printing the mainspring using a different material OR by buying in stainless steel. I'm going to go to the steel - it gives a much better power reserve.

    50 pack of nozzles on order today, from 0.2mm upwards. Next week should see the next stage and if I crack that nut, it'll be time to buy the full file set and print the rest. I'll have pins to fabricate, so there's a few tools to be bought.

    For anyone interested, full build PDF manual is here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/18l7...i3QYIsUMQ/view
    Last edited by JohnnyE; 17th November 2020 at 12:28.

  31. #31
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,982
    Amazing stuff, Johnny - really impressive finish for that first plate.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by PreacherCain View Post
    Amazing stuff, Johnny - really impressive finish for that first plate.
    When you consider that the base printer is around £200, its brilliant really. That's done with a 0.4mm head. Once I switch to 0.2mm for the escapement parts, it'll be interesting to see how the parts look with half the layer height.

  33. #33
    Craftsman SydR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    Lothian.
    Posts
    523
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyE View Post
    That's some serious upgrades! Post up a pic - I'd love to see that. One thing I want to do to mine is relocate the filament spindle. Its in a bad position up there and really needs some kind of bearing assisted setup for smoother spinning.
    Itís not sitting in the most photogenic place at present . Got it beside the hot water tank to keep ambient temperature up as trying out ABS.

  34. #34
    Grand Master RustyBin5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Scotland central
    Posts
    11,435
    Are these machines silent or noisy. Never seen one in the flesh and curious enough to consider exploring this rabbit hole but donít want to upset her indoors

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by RustyBin5 View Post
    Are these machines silent or noisy. Never seen one in the flesh and curious enough to consider exploring this rabbit hole but donít want to upset her indoors
    The fans are noisy - mine's in the study upstairs and runs without being heard elsewhere in the house though. There is also a slight whiff of molten plastic whilst printing but only in the room itself. Its not strong enough to spread. My V2 has silent stepper controllers. I gather the older Enders came with more noisy steppers.

  36. #36
    Grand Master RustyBin5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Scotland central
    Posts
    11,435
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyE View Post
    The fans are noisy - mine's in the study upstairs and runs without being heard elsewhere in the house though. There is also a slight whiff of molten plastic whilst printing but only in the room itself. Its not strong enough to spread. My V2 has silent stepper controllers. I gather the older Enders came with more noisy steppers.
    Ok thank you, food for thought then

  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by RustyBin5 View Post
    Ok thank you, food for thought then
    Post #25 above - I have a video of it running. Stick headphones in and that gives you a fairly accurate idea of the noise. 2 x PC sized fans are inside the print head and I can hear 1 or 2 large fans running under the bed, probably for the power supply cooling. Its those that cause the racket - the actual moving parts are almost silent.

    One thing to note, you can upgrade all these parts and I've seen that some people add better quality (ie quieter) fans. Might do that myself over time.
    Last edited by JohnnyE; 18th November 2020 at 12:42.

  38. #38
    ... and then there were three!


  39. #39
    Escapement work continues... the top and bottom cages are done. About 6 hours of printing for these 3 sets and I'm pleased with the results. Had to increase temp to 230C at the hot end and 80C on the bed to stop stringing and make sure the print adhered to the glass bed.

    As usual, a bit of time with the modelling files after to clean them up:



    This week, the following will be done:

    1. Balance wheel
    2. Impulse pin
    3. Fork bridge
    4. Planetary
    5. Escapement wheel
    6. Hairspring


    I've got lengths of 1.5mm steel rod coming in the post for fabricating the various posts, a set of digital vernier callipers and some M2 hex head screws/bolts. Currently trying to find somewhere to buy stainless steel strips to make the hairsprings but might just 3D print them in the interim.

  40. #40
    Was thinking of this thread, looking on HUKD, and saw this:
    https://m.tomtop.com/p-os1622eu.html...tm_campaign=de

  41. #41
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Doncaster
    Posts
    905
    Iím new to the thread.....amazing, I had heard of this 3D printing thing but no idea what it was. How is it progressing

  42. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Ashtons99 View Post
    Iím new to the thread.....amazing, I had heard of this 3D printing thing but no idea what it was. How is it progressing
    I've done very little - Christmas got in the way... and work. I've bought in all the parts for the next stage:

    • smaller nozzles for the finer work on the geartrain
    • 1 x roll of PETG (instead of PLA) for the hairspring. Its tougher/harder and makes for a better spring
    • Various steel rod lengths to make the posts (lots of them!)
    • Various hex head bolts


    So, thanks for bumping this thread. I'll get back to it this coming week. The plan remains, 1 for me, 1 as a surprise for my Dad..... 1 for the fundraiser to the highest bidder! I'd safely say that there will be 100+ hours of printing in this all by the time I'm done.

    One observation - when you buy one of these as a "hobby" you'll end up printing a load of useless crap off Thingyverse. Most of what I've printed is pretty useless. It's nice to have this as a proper project to work on.

  43. #43
    Master Templogin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Shetland
    Posts
    1,767
    I am really impressed with this thread. Thanks for making the effort.

    I have been considering 3D printing for a while, so I have earmarked a budget of £1,000 for a printer. All I have on my list are two sets of triangular based pyramid dice for the Royal Game of Ur set I am trying to put together, and a set of TSA keys, but apparently they are bound to fail in plastic. I also want to make the bottle where all surfaces are on the outside. I just can't remember what is is called.

    I don't have much idea of where to start yet so I will follow this thread with interest.

  44. #44
    Master Seiko7A38's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    S.W. England
    Posts
    3,374
    Quote Originally Posted by Templogin View Post
    I also want to make the bottle where all surfaces are on the outside. I just can't remember what is is called.
    A Klein bottle ?

  45. #45
    Master Templogin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Shetland
    Posts
    1,767
    Quote Originally Posted by Seiko7A38 View Post
    That's the one!

  46. #46
    Master geordie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
    Posts
    1,663
    Fascinating thread, looking forward to further updates

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Do Not Sell My Personal Information