closing tag is in template navbar
Time Factors Watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Results 1 to 33 of 33

Thread: New hip anyone?

  1. #1
    Master spuds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    1,705

    New hip anyone?

    Gents I hope you are all well....

    Long story short I’ve struggled with an arthritic hip for years but it literally cripples me some days now so I’m biting the bullet and getting myself a new one!!

    Any experiences, pre or post op tips welcome please, thank you.
    Last edited by spuds; 3rd May 2021 at 17:12.

  2. #2
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Devon, UK
    Posts
    946
    Quote Originally Posted by spuds View Post
    Gents I hope you are all well....

    Long story short Iíve struggled with an arthritic hip for years but it literally cripples me some days now so Iím biting the bullet and getting myself a new one!!

    Any experiences, pre or post op tips welcome please, thank you.
    Do your post op physio! The results depend on it

  3. #3
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    852
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by spuds View Post
    Gents I hope you are all well....

    Long story short Iíve struggled with an arthritic hip for years but it literally cripples me some days now so Iím biting the bullet and getting myself a new one!!

    Any experiences, pre or post op tips welcome please, thank you.
    In the same position as you. Finally had mine diagnosed last year as severe wear practically everywhere on the right side. Lots of pills help me sleep. Work is tiresome, but still plodding on.
    In terms of pain, well, I know when one had a good day ;-/

  4. #4
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Winchester
    Posts
    1,570
    Try to get yourself in the best possible shape beforehand - that's a dilemma as you have to pick exercise carefully or it hurts!

    Then follow rehab carefully, they will want you up and active asap.

  5. #5
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Between the lines
    Posts
    366
    I canít offer any advice on this subject, but when I saw the thread title I was hoping it was posted in SC .

  6. #6
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    13,754
    My Dad had his done recently aged 70 and I couldn't believe how well and rather easily he recovered. Post Op physio always done and did as he was told. You'd never know he'd had it done now.

    Good luck with yours.

  7. #7
    Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Herts
    Posts
    1,626
    My next door neighbour had both his done in his 70s and was right as rain. One of my friends had one done in his mid 40s and it was too loose in the femur implant and had to be redone 6 months later though is now fine. Though he has had to give up running. Another anecdote I know through another friend is of someone in his forties who was a mad keen cyclist and had it done and was able to ride the pre Tour Alpe D'Huez race a month later. So like anything it depends but seems an overwhelmingly positive op to have.

  8. #8
    Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    south wales
    Posts
    2,774
    Im unable to offer any advice.

    My brother though, has had both his hips replaced.

    He has also had a "new" knee..Whilst the knee was quite painful, he said he was really surprised, at how good the hip recovery was. Quite quick and relatively painless was his verdict on the recovery for both hips.

  9. #9
    Master spuds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    1,705
    Thanks for the posts Gents, when I saw the consultant my original plan was to book it for the til end of this year, maybe six months so I can shed some weight and get fitter beforehand but he said ďI really wouldnít worry too much, do it anyway by all means but just seeing you walk and looking at your x-rays it must be bloody hard work exercising with that hip, trust me youíll be running round like a big kid afterwards so I wouldnít kill yourself beforehandĒ.

    Nevertheless Iím determined to shed a couple of stone and resume at least daily walks between now and August.

    I honestly think Iíve forgotten how to walk normally though, itís my left hip thatís bad and Iím aware that I donít bend that knee as I walk (I literally swing my leg), I was out with my wife walking the dog the other day and deliberately tried to bend my knee as I walked and ended up looking like something out of Monty Python!!

  10. #10
    Master
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    SUNNY BRISTOL
    Posts
    3,097
    Flow the rehab instructions to the letter, do not push it if it feels better thereís plenty of time for that when the hip is fully bedded in and the healing process is well under way.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Flow the rehab instructions to the letter, do not push it if it feels better thereís plenty of time for that when the hip is fully bedded in and the healing process is well under way.

  11. #11
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    6,168
    Had my right hip replaced five years ago at age 68. Recovery went fast and I was walking a few miles per day within a month. After about three months I rushed to get out of my recliner to answer the phone and hurt something down there. Ever since, I've had pain both at the joint site and at the outer Great Trochanter (hip bone), which my orthopedist says is bursitis. I'm pissed that my recovery was progressing splendidly until I jacked it up jumping out of my recliner!

  12. #12
    I don't have first hand experience of the operation but do have a lot of experience since my Dad designed the most popular implant used in Europe, The Exeter Hip. He would tell you that the two most important things are the skill of the surgeon performing the operation and the implant you have. His implant designs been used for over 50 years and uses bone cement to form a Morse Taper with the polished stainless steel implant, which gives excellent longevity due to the way the implant can creep in the bone cement over time.

    The best place to find out about the longevity of the implant you are having is to visit the National Joint Registry at https://www.njrcentre.org.uk/njrcentre/default.aspx. You can also find out about surgeon outcomes there.

  13. #13
    Master markl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wigan
    Posts
    1,493
    Had both mine done at a relatively early age - buggered them up with football and running - arthritis.

    Pain free and relatively straight forward recovery. Have much more flexibility now than I had for the previous 20+ years. I have never regretted getting them done.

    I found yoga very useful after a period of recovery/physio.

    Good luck.

  14. #14
    Master spuds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    1,705
    Thanks again Gents, and Sorry to read of your bursitis pacific, will that get better in time or...???

    And Phil, my thanks to your Dad obviously, that’s no small claim to fame!

    I’m 52 and although overweight I’m healthy enough otherwise so I’m optimistic and my surgeon seems very competent and certainly has good stat’s...

    and Mark thanks for the tip, a salesman that calls in at my yard also recommended yoga (as well as Pilates) so I’ll be giving both of those a go.
    Last edited by spuds; 3rd May 2021 at 21:17.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by spuds View Post
    Sorry to read of your bursitis pacific, will that get better in time or...???

    And Phil, my thanks to your Dad obviously, thatís no small claim to fame!

    Iím 52 and although overweight Iím healthy enough otherwise so Iím optimistic and my surgeon seems very competent and certainly has good statís...
    Thanks :) There have been over 2 million of his implants used which always amazes me.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Lee View Post
    Thanks :) There have been over 2 million of his implants used which always amazes me.
    Clive Lee is responsible for millions of people walking pain-free again courtesy of the Exeter hip.
    In my business that's Bono from U2 or Mick Jagger levels of fame and importance.

    I have implanted many many Exeter stems, the engineering and taper slip is wonderful. There are papers out there quoting solid reliability rates at 44yrs of use! Amazing.

    Hats off to your dad. An unsung hero of British engineering.

    Brits invented and continue to perfect the hip replacement for the world.

    Charnley of Wrightington
    Ling and Lee of Exeter
    McMinn of Birmingham.
    The gods of hip replacement

  17. #17
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Harlow Essex
    Posts
    103
    Just had mine done 4 weeks ago.

    I'm 59 pretty fit and strong but it's been hard going.

    The op is pretty straightforward but the trauma to the leg is huge.

    Managing to walk reasonably now without crutches but very limited distance.

    Wound and hip site still sore and stiff but getting better by a miniscule amount each day

    Do you prescribed exercises religiously both pre op and post but don't overdo it and rest is as important.

    Elevate and ice leg if swollen oh and take your prescribed painkillers especially the first couple of weeks.

    Any questions feel free to ask

    Sent from my SM-N975F using TZ-UK mobile app

  18. #18
    Master spuds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    1,705
    Noaksey thank you, and I hope yours improves daily mate....

  19. #19
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    willington,UK
    Posts
    834
    had both of mine done,well in fact i have had 3 done but thats another story,it hurts for the first week,after that the pain starts to lessen then its plain sailing and after a year you dont even think about it.go for it.its made a huge difference to my life.
    Last edited by greasemonkey; 4th May 2021 at 07:43. Reason: spelin

  20. #20
    Craftsman HookedSeven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    421
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Lee View Post
    I don't have first hand experience of the operation but do have a lot of experience since my Dad designed the most popular implant used in Europe, The Exeter Hip. He would tell you that the two most important things are the skill of the surgeon performing the operation and the implant you have. His implant designs been used for over 50 years and uses bone cement to form a Morse Taper with the polished stainless steel implant, which gives excellent longevity due to the way the implant can creep in the bone cement over time.

    The best place to find out about the longevity of the implant you are having is to visit the National Joint Registry at https://www.njrcentre.org.uk/njrcentre/default.aspx. You can also find out about surgeon outcomes there.
    Big coincidence ! I dated the daughter of the guy who designed the Exeter hip all through university and for a few years after. Hi Phil, hope youíre well !!

  21. #21
    Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Harrow
    Posts
    4,246
    My wife (66) had hers done in July last year - best money we have ever spent. Given her a life back. By September all was good, walking and swimming without any pain. At the sports club I belong to, two friends have had theirs done, both cycling within a month,and running (properly) within 3 months.
    Now 10 months later, my wife would never even think she had it done unless reminded.

  22. #22
    Master Artistmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Devon, U.K.
    Posts
    1,762
    After a misdiagnosis that cost me a few years of pretty ghastly pain, the result of the final emergency hip replacement was amazing. My advice to anyone contemplating the op is to do it as fast as possible, it's brilliant!

    I too had the Exeter hip which I've now had in for thirteen years and not a sign of pain or problems since, it really changes your life. Having talked to others operated on in the same hospital, one factor became apparent that contributed to the succesful outcome definitely seemed to be the ability and experience of the surgeon doing it, so do your research!

    As mentioned by others, the physio and exercise following the operation is vital to the result too so don't skip it... As I said it's a life changing procedure , you'll be surprised at just how good it is once your rehabilitated, which doesn't take long.

  23. #23
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Winchester
    Posts
    1,570
    Quote Originally Posted by The Doc View Post
    Clive Lee is responsible for millions of people walking pain-free again courtesy of the Exeter hip.
    In my business that's Bono from U2 or Mick Jagger levels of fame and importance.

    I have implanted many many Exeter stems, the engineering and taper slip is wonderful. There are papers out there quoting solid reliability rates at 44yrs of use! Amazing.

    Hats off to your dad. An unsung hero of British engineering.

    Brits invented and continue to perfect the hip replacement for the world.

    Charnley of Wrightington
    Ling and Lee of Exeter
    McMinn of Birmingham.
    The gods of hip replacement
    HI Doc

    Talking of McMinn, are you able to shed any specialist light on what's the latest with re-surfacing? Last time I looked Cobb was about to start clinical trials using ceramic on ceramic to make it a process that could work for a wider demographic by averting the ion problem and associated testing regime.

  24. #24
    Master spuds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    1,705
    Gents thank you again for all the positive and encouraging comments....

    I'm paying for mine so can pretty much go whenever I like but have to tie it in around when I can get time off work, and it's booked in for mid-August.

    I'm so glad someone said "best money we ever spent" as it's a fair chunk of money and we're off to the Maldives in Feb' (not my own ideal holiday but more of a five-years cancer-free present for my wife), so we're hoping I'll be more or less fully recovered by then (ie: six months after) and able to enjoy walking along the beach and snorkelling as well as not be crippled by the ten hour flight!!

    Thanks again Gents....

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by thegreatdogwood View Post
    HI Doc

    Talking of McMinn, are you able to shed any specialist light on what's the latest with re-surfacing? Last time I looked Cobb was about to start clinical trials using ceramic on ceramic to make it a process that could work for a wider demographic by averting the ion problem and associated testing regime.
    Did my final year Engineering degree project on artificial hips 25 years ago. Talk was of ceramic/ceramic or Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum alloys, seems not much progress has been made if it's still just being considered

  26. #26
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Bath,UK
    Posts
    773
    I donít have any personal experience to add, but Iím curious about the plans for pre-op exercise. If youíre struggling to walk in a normal symmetrical way at the moment surely thereís a risk of putting a great deal of strain on your other side - hip, knee, ankle, spine etc? From my sporting background this would typically have been the case, where over compensating leads to further problems. Just curious from a medical/biomechanics perspective whether itís better to have the operation early with a longer rehab, instead of trying to get fit for a few months first.

    Hope all goes well with the op either way!

  27. #27
    Master spuds's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    1,705
    Quote Originally Posted by PhilT View Post
    I donít have any personal experience to add, but Iím curious about the plans for pre-op exercise. If youíre struggling to walk in a normal symmetrical way at the moment surely thereís a risk of putting a great deal of strain on your other side - hip, knee, ankle, spine etc? From my sporting background this would typically have been the case, where over compensating leads to further problems. Just curious from a medical/biomechanics perspective whether itís better to have the operation early with a longer rehab, instead of trying to get fit for a few months first.

    Hope all goes well with the op either way!
    Hello Phil, you're quite right in that I do indeed put a great deal of strain on my 'good' knee etc, and every week for the last year or more I've seen either a chiropractor or a deep tissue masseur (who I also do my 'personal training' with)...

    He's absolutely mustard and has given me general as well as isolation exercises which help strengthen and straighten, and he's very much of the opinion that the stronger/fitter and healthier I am going in, the better I'll be coming out.
    (To be honest I think this is pretty much common sense and no-one would argue).

    The surgeon agreed with the above but also said that it would be best to have the op' sooner rather than later as a) I'm "not that overweight" [his words not mine!] and b) it'll be far easier to exercise afterwards.

    There's a six-eight week lead in even self-paying though so that realistically takes us to the end of June and I'm (hopefully) away with the family the beginning of July....

    The next time I can get away from work is mid-August which is when I have the op' booked for, so I'll use the time between now and then to lose weight and get fitter anyway.

  28. #28
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    biddulph moor
    Posts
    492
    Quote Originally Posted by Brighty View Post
    Did my final year Engineering degree project on artificial hips 25 years ago. Talk was of ceramic/ceramic or Cobalt-Chromium-Molybdenum alloys, seems not much progress has been made if it's still just being considered
    Wow, same here in 2006 I think!

    micro structural modifications of Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum was the title of mine.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by thegreatdogwood View Post
    HI Doc

    Talking of McMinn, are you able to shed any specialist light on what's the latest with re-surfacing? Last time I looked Cobb was about to start clinical trials using ceramic on ceramic to make it a process that could work for a wider demographic by averting the ion problem and associated testing regime.
    Tribology eh?

    Of the 94,677 hip replacement operations performed last year in the UK, 0.6% or about 600 odd people, were resurfacings.
    This down from 10% of the total performed in resurfacing's peak year of 2006.
    So it's died a death.

    600 people out of 94,000 had a resurfacing, and that's including Andy Murray.

    The vast majority of this work is Birmingham Hip replacements, because really the copies became untenable and there are many many lawsuits in the USA. Google search "Hip resurfacing AND lawyer"
    The Birmingham is a metal on metal with a very high congruency.

    If I needed a hip replacement, I'd go for a Ceramic on ceramic, although the fracture rate is still a possibility. Or just simple ceramic on polyethylene. Justin Cobb has done lots of work on this. Apparently the new ceramics don't fracture as much.
    The low surface asperity of the ceramic causes minimal (compared to usual) wear. And it is said if the poly wears out in 15 years, you could just do a liner (poly) replacement and keep the ceramic head.

    And I don't even replace hips. I do put the Exeter Trauma Stem ETS in for trauma (Thank you Mr Lee)

    If the science of the bearing is interesting to you, this 2018 review paper is good: Full free text https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5994629/
    Last edited by The Doc; 6th May 2021 at 16:14.

  30. #30
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    6,168
    Quote Originally Posted by spuds View Post
    Gents thank you again for all the positive and encouraging comments....

    I'm paying for mine so can pretty much go whenever I like but have to tie it in around when I can get time off work, and it's booked in for mid-August.

    I'm so glad someone said "best money we ever spent" as it's a fair chunk of money and we're off to the Maldives in Feb' (not my own ideal holiday but more of a five-years cancer-free present for my wife), so we're hoping I'll be more or less fully recovered by then (ie: six months after) and able to enjoy walking along the beach and snorkelling as well as not be crippled by the ten hour flight!!

    Thanks again Gents....
    Do your rehab diligently and you should be in fine shape.

  31. #31
    Master Yorkshiremadmick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Yorkshire man in Northumberland
    Posts
    2,167

    New hip anyone?

    I was diagnosed December 2019 as needing a hip replacement. January 2020 the X-ray confirmed bone on bone wear on my left hip, with the right hip showing signs. I met with a consultant in May, then it went quiet. Then in September all systems go, operation due 7/9/2020. But a few days before, cancelled as the Consultant said he had found Haemochromatosis ? More tests later and a CT scan to rule out cancer. None found. January this Year, Mr Emmerson the consultant has talked to Mr Carluke who is eminently better suited to perform my hip replacement.
    Now just waiting. All the time getting less mobile.


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app
    Last edited by Yorkshiremadmick; 5th May 2021 at 07:10.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by ac82 View Post
    Wow, same here in 2006 I think!

    micro structural modifications of Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum was the title of mine.
    My final year was 96-97. 'Artificial replacement hips - Surface finish considerations' or something along those lines, which eventually morphed into the design of a hip joint simulator, most of the work done in the 3 weeks before hand in deadline

  33. #33
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    biddulph moor
    Posts
    492
    Quote Originally Posted by Brighty View Post
    My final year was 96-97. 'Artificial replacement hips - Surface finish considerations' or something along those lines, which eventually morphed into the design of a hip joint simulator, most of the work done in the 3 weeks before hand in deadline
    I spent all my time down in the bottom of the engineering block at the furnace heat treating various samples in little glass tubes filled with argon.

    After SEM work the results were shared with JRI and Depuy? I believe.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Do Not Sell My Personal Information