closing tag is in template navbar
Time Factors Watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Something I was wondering about electric cars...

  1. #1
    Master Alansmithee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Burscough, UK
    Posts
    8,820

    Something I was wondering about electric cars...

    What happens to all of the independent garages? tune-up places? (likely trying to adjust the software is noted and invalidates the warrenty)?

  2. #2
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    swansea uk
    Posts
    2,046
    Quote Originally Posted by Alansmithee View Post
    What happens to all of the independent garages? tune-up places? (likely trying to adjust the software is noted and invalidates the warrenty)?
    It would hardly be a shock



  3. #3
    Master Harry Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Wolverhampton
    Posts
    3,392
    I think what goes on under the hood has increasingly become a huge mystery even for some main dealers. There will always be tyres, suspension and body repairs. You could argue that electrickery is less complex than ICE and discrete electronics are a thing of the past anyway, you just change a unit or board.

  4. #4
    Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    South Yorkshire at the moment
    Posts
    3,020
    The sale of new ones might be banned but there will be plenty of petrol and diesel engine cars on the road for a long time to come.

  5. #5
    If we are lucky legislators will act to prevent manufacturers having a monopoly on servicing and repair of EVs, much as they have trimmed efforts by ICE manufacturers to tie you to min dealers by various methods.

  6. #6
    Master Alansmithee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Burscough, UK
    Posts
    8,820
    Quote Originally Posted by ernestrome View Post
    If we are lucky legislators will act to prevent manufacturers having a monopoly on servicing and repair of EVs, much as they have trimmed efforts by ICE manufacturers to tie you to min dealers by various methods.
    Don't a few of the brands also use bespoke tool-kits to prevent an independent servicing a car or did I dream this?

  7. #7
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Bungay England
    Posts
    502
    I know if certain components are changed on my BMW they have to be coded back to the car. I understand the software is on the expensive side so may seem more specialist independents

    Sent from my SM-T800 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    london, uk
    Posts
    198
    Quote Originally Posted by ernestrome View Post
    If we are lucky legislators will act to prevent manufacturers having a monopoly on servicing and repair of EVs, much as they have trimmed efforts by ICE manufacturers to tie you to min dealers by various methods.
    Nope! If anything it's going the other way, Tesla are obviously the glaring example, however BMW, Nissan, VW,etc are going the same route.

  9. #9
    Of course they will try until restrained, hence the need for prevention of monopoly/unfair trading. No doubt the manufacturers will be lobbying hard, citing safety concerns and f generally making it as hard as possible for the owner or a specialist to get in.

  10. #10
    Grand Master Dave+63's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    East Sussex
    Posts
    13,276
    I long since stopped having my Nissan EV serviced.

    For an ever increasing amount of money, they face it a quick visual check, topped up the washer bottle and replaced the pollen filter. For £50 more on alternate years they also replaced the brake fluid.

    An MOT is a much more thorough check and the rest I can do myself for peanuts.

    Thatís all there is to it, no engine, gearbox, exhaust etc to worry about.

    It is and will continue to be very difficult for anyone (main dealer or independent) to justify charging large sums for servicing vehicles that donít actually need servicing.

  11. #11
    With Electric cars the various cartels will have a much more usable argument for the legislators, Safety, claiming that if unapproved repairers start sticking their fingers in places they shouldn't it is dangerous, all its going to take is a few frazzled fitters and they will get their own way.

  12. #12
    Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Kent UK
    Posts
    1,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave+63 View Post

    It is and will continue to be very difficult for anyone (main dealer or independent) to justify charging large sums for servicing vehicles that donít actually need servicing.
    I'm sure they will find a way. :) My thinking is that if autonomous technology continues to progress we are probably a generation, or two at most, away from the end of widespread car ownership, especially in cities. In the interim we will move more and more towards EV as a Service. Traditional independent garages will die out but I'm sure some new style service industry will develop around EVs.

  13. #13
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Bungay England
    Posts
    502
    I think the future will evolve more and more into lease hire. In a very similar way to the mobile phone market. You pay a monthly fee and all costs are covered. With EVs unless something catastrophic goes wrong with the motor most of the maintenance is routine e.g brake pads, suspension and tyres etc. The wizardry seems to happen in the software

    Sent from my moto g(7) plus using Tapatalk

  14. #14
    When we're forced to go fully electric, I think our attitudes to car ownership will change. So many houses don't have off street parking, so couldn't charge an EV.

    House's with offroad parking will see an increase on value as you'll be able to charge at home. Councils may be forced to allocate roadside parking immediately outside houses to the house owner. Or they may just refuse, as they know that without an allocated space, car ownership becomes very difficult. I forsee rubber mats over pavements with the cables underneath.

    Charge times are not going to come anywhere near fossil fuel refuelling times. Charging faster has a very marked effect on battery longevity. So "petrol stations" are likely to become larger as there will be a need to refuel more cars at any one time, to keep the queues down. Shopping malls could well fill this need, what better to draw customers in for half an hour of retail therapy than the need to charge their car?

    With so many people having discovered working at home, we may find that giving up cars is not as difficult a step as it may have been.


    As for the original question, I think there will be a small market for tuning electric vehicles. Just as petrol cars aren't tuned for maximum power, electric cars won't be either. With a petrol car, you'd be looking for knock resistance to stop warranty claims (& sometimes just de-tuning to allow you to sell a hotter version of the same engine), with a electric car it's about battery longevity. To make the batteries last longer, you can limit the maximum current and not use the full capacity of the pack. I can't see why there won't be a market for re-maps that open up these limits, after all the tuner doesn't care if your battery starts degrading a few months later.

    Similarly, there's likely to be a market for motor & controller upgrades. Battery upgrades could well be prohibitively expensive.

  15. #15
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    546
    My friend owns one of the largest chip and remap companies in the UK, and things are in place, they will be just fine, the guys are clever enough to adapt very quickly


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by J3w3ll3r View Post
    My friend owns one of the largest chip and remap companies in the UK, and things are in place, they will be just fine, the guys are clever enough to adapt very quickly


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Just imagine a world where there are parallels between the EV car world, and overclocking PC's, flashing firmware onto mobile smartphones, 'hackintosh' Mac builds, etc etc. Tesla are a good example, with the various power and range options being dictated by software. It's what allowed Tesla to unlock extra range in a recent Florida hurricane season to allow people to get out of the city (LINK). Once tuners work out how to do this themselves they'll be laughing.


    Also, I read an article somewhere recently (if I find it again I'll share it) that spoke of car dealers being very disinterested in EV sales, as there is no ongoing money to be made from it. The margins on selling cars is terrible, the real money comes from ongoing service, repair, warranty agreements, etc, all of which shrink massively in the EV world. How true it is I don't know, but it feels believable.

  17. #17
    Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Herts
    Posts
    1,673


    I guess this is an example of how they will adapt

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by J3w3ll3r View Post
    My friend owns one of the largest chip and remap companies in the UK, and things are in place, they will be just fine, the guys are clever enough to adapt very quickly


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Really!! How does he work that out? Remembering this thread is about electric cars.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Do Not Sell My Personal Information