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Thread: Extracting Seiko Tuna shroud screws - updated with victory story!

  1. #1
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
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    Extracting Seiko Tuna shroud screws - updated with victory story!

    I would love to have some advice on this: I have an SBBN025 "Darth Tuna". Ebay purchase, all good. Except that at some point in its life, someone has tried to remove the allen head screws which hold the shroud on, and one of them is chewed up to the point that my 1.5mm allen key (which works fine in the other screws) just spins, without engaging at all.

    With my "amateur mechanic" hat on, I'd be thinking penetrant, then blowtorch, then impact driver, then a long breaker bar, then ultimately either drilling or using an EZ-out - but none of this seems applicable to the non-destructive removal of a watch shroud!

    I'd be really grateful for any advice on this - so far I have thought about careful drilling (which risks mashing up the hole in the case) or dremel-ing slots in the head to take a philips screwdriver, but I haven't the guts to try either without guidance.
    Last edited by PreacherCain; 3rd April 2021 at 16:27.

  2. #2
    Master Sinnlover's Avatar
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    low power loctite? - the blue stuff?
    A dab in the hole, stick in the allen key leave to set.
    take out screw and when done warm the allen key and then separate screw and key?

  3. #3
    Master Kaffe's Avatar
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    Jam a flat end screwdriver into the hole?

  4. #4
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinnlover View Post
    low power loctite? - the blue stuff?
    A dab in the hole, stick in the allen key leave to set.
    take out screw and when done warm the allen key and then separate screw and key?
    I think you're on the right track, but I'd go for something stronger, like Superglue. Once the screw has been extracted, you can use acetone to separate the driver from the screw.

  5. #5
    Master Onelasttime's Avatar
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    They will need drilling out. Been there, done that… twice!

    Tuna shroud screws are made of butter so when you do extract them, get some proper screws from Andy Stockley at tunascrews@gmail.com.

    He's a top bloke and does hex, posi and star screws. It's been a while since I contacted him so I have no idea if he still does them? Fingers crossed and good luck

  6. #6
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
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    Thank you for the advice, gents. I’ll try the superglue idea first, though I suspect it may struggle. I have found a set of small screw extractors, the smallest of which (and associated drill bit) is 2mm, so that’s my plan B.

    I have already been in touch with Andy Stockley - he is still doing replacement screws, but doesn’t have them in the correct dark grey for a Darth; he told me he’s in talks with suppliers to find someone who can coat steel screws correctly, but supply is not imminent. Hence I got some replacements from Seiko. Hell, if they turn out to be rubbish I will at least have removed the unsightly mangled screw from my eyeline, and if I can drill a screw out once I can do it again.

  7. #7
    Grand Master
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    A tip I was once given with something similar (not a watch) was to pack it with bluetac and then try the Allen key, it can give just enough purchase to start it off apparently
    ktmog6uk
    marchingontogether!



  8. #8
    Craftsman martyloveswatches's Avatar
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    Let us know did it worked and what worked in the end. My colleague has the 7549 tuna with the same problem. He removed the shroud but the screw is now one body with the case...

  9. #9
    Jam a Torx head in? Might catch where the allen key fails.

  10. #10
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by acg View Post
    Jam a Torx head in? Might catch where the allen key fails.
    This. I would hammer in a slightly too big torx bit. When you replace the screws put some copper anti-seize lubricant on the threads so you can get them out easier next time

    Sent from my [null] using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    Grand Master JasonM's Avatar
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    Its going to be safer to work on this with the movement and dial / hands removed if you can, the other think you might try is to heat up the screw with the tip of a soldering iron, if the screw is loctited in it may free the threads.
    Cheers..
    Jase

  12. #12
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonM View Post
    Its going to be safer to work on this with the movement and dial / hands removed if you can, the other think you might try is to heat up the screw with the tip of a soldering iron, if the screw is loctited in it may free the threads.
    Could also try popping it in the freezer if you can remove the movement - heat and cold - the contrast may make the different metals free from each other

  13. #13
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
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    I finally got round to sorting this out today... As I had two knackered screws, some time on my hands and various ideas, I thought I’d try a number of them.

    Mixed results, honestly... Superglue didn’t achieve anything, the bond wasn’t enough to give me purchase with an Allen key or torx head. Next!

    A small drill and extractor set courtesy of Jeff’s Magic Cupboard didn’t get me very far either; the drill was fine, but the screw so soft that the extractor just chewed metal rather than turned the screw. Last option awaits...

    The Dremel. I cut a slot across the top of the whole screw, wide enough to take a full size screwdriver blade. Considered making it a cross, for Phillips, but reasoned that might not leave enough metal to withstand the AWESOME TORQUE from a proper screwdriver.

    Result: total victory. The screw came out with a little bit of pressure but really didn’t need much to break the grip of the loctite. Excellent.

    As an aside: removal of movement etc not really practical as the Darth is a front loader and accessing the sealing ring to remove the crystal and movement requires the shroud to come off first. For this reason I decided not to try heat/cold cycling or the BFO Hammer approach.

    Also: interesting that the shroud is “structural”, in that it retails the bezel as well as covering the sealing ring and Crystal gasket. Very nice bit of design IMO, and makes cleaning the (significant quantities) of mulch out of the crevices in the bezel mechanism very easy.

    So, there we are. Dremel wins. Photographic evidence below. Many thanks to all for the advice, and I hope this info is useful to others.




  14. #14
    Craftsman
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    Congratulations! I am glad you won in the end. I miss my Darth, they are great watches.

    Sent from my [null] using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    Master
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    Brilliant well done - happy days

  16. #16
    Craftsman
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    Well done, only already knackered bits get more knackered.
    Dave

  17. #17
    Craftsman martyloveswatches's Avatar
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    Great! Just what I needed to help a colleague on other forum.

    How did you cut a slot on the screw?I am curious...

    And what spare screws did you get?Original or aftermatket?I know for ss but for black ones I would like to know where to order cause I have the sbbn025 ...

    Tnx
    Last edited by martyloveswatches; Today at 13:40.

  18. #18
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martyloveswatches View Post
    Great! Just what I needed to help a colleague on other forum.

    How did you cut a slot on the screw?I am curious...

    And what spare screws did you get?Original or aftermatket?I know for ss but for black ones I would like to know where to order cause I have the sbbn025 ...

    Tnx
    To cut the slot I used a cutting disc on a Dremel-type rotary tool. Put the watch, suitably padded, in a vice to hold it steady, and then slowly and carefully cut the screw head.

    Replacement screws I got from Seiko UK, told them I needed 4 screws for an SBBN025, paid £30 and got the screws in the post the next day. Good luck...!

  19. #19
    Craftsman martyloveswatches's Avatar
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    Tnx mate

    Poslano sa mog SM-G960F koriste?i Tapatalk

  20. #20
    Master Onelasttime's Avatar
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    Good work.

    They really are a faff but thankfully not something you should need to do too often in the watch's lifetime

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