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Thread: Haemorrhoids

  1. #1
    Craftsman
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    Haemorrhoids

    Are a pain in the arse.Any one else suffer? Please recommend Me some treatments lol.

  2. #2
    Master tiny73's Avatar
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    Before everyone else piles in, try Anusol suppositories. Don’t ring their helpline though, terribly rude.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny73 View Post
    Before everyone else piles in, try Anusol suppositories. Don’t ring their helpline though, terribly rude.
    Lol it’s lucky We can all laugh at these things.Thanks

  4. #4
    Master reggie747's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lew07 View Post
    Are a pain in the arse.Any one else suffer? Please recommend Me some treatments lol.
    Zyloproct.
    That's all.
    Thank me later.
    You're welcome.

  5. #5
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    Surgery. Suffered for 15 years, not looked back in the last 15 years.


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app

  6. #6
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    Ah the joy of a Dukie :(

    This. Nothing over the counter like Anusol etc works.
    Quote Originally Posted by reggie747 View Post
    Zyloproct.
    That's all.
    Thank me later.
    You're welcome.
    Last edited by TaketheCannoli; 6th December 2020 at 12:33.

  7. #7
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    When grandad was in hospital having his "sorted" I took him a bunch of grapes! He was not amused! More walking and less sitting works.

  8. #8
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Unfortunately too many people ridicule anything related to bowels, rectums and anuses. Too many ignorant people regard the lower digestive tracts as the body's 'dustbin' ... and all parts thereof as either unmentionables or items to joke about ... especially when discussing e.g. piles, fistulas, haemotomas, prolapses, constipation etc. etc. But little do they know of how the lower gut's digestive processes influence our microbiome and immune system ... and thus healing. There are many articles available online documenting the importance of the human microbiome and how it can be 'tuned up' to improve our health.

    Surgery is not necessary for all cases of piles/ haemorrhoids and there is much that can be done to ease the problem via diet ... e.g., introducing soluble and insoluble types of dietary fibre ... which are digested by the millions of gut flora and thus boost the microbiome ... and, to put it bluntly, 'give the bowels something to grip on' ... thus easing digested food transit and a person's propensity to piles / haemorrhoids. But straining when passing stools is not the only cause of piles ... poor sitting posture, lack of exercise, smoking, alcohol, and genetics also influence an individual's propensity for developing haemorrhoids.

    Piles should not be ignored and professional medical advice should be sought ... especially if accompanied by bleeding which can be indicative of e.g. polyps as well as piles.

    Using topical remedies for piles e.g. Anusol, might relieve the symptoms ... but long term might not be a solution ... especially if a sufferer has not addressed his / her poor diet, smoking, alcohol consumption and lack of exercise.

    Sufferers are often reluctant to seek professional medical advice ... partly because it can be a 'taboo' subject and others you confide in treat it as a joke and 'make fun' of the symptoms. Also, the prospect of a rectal examination can be daunting ... but it's a relatively painless procedure and takes less than 30 seconds.

    One GP may have saved my life when I consulted him about persistent rectal bleeding ... he did a rectal examination and discovered not a pile, but what transpired to be a 'ripe' pre-cancerous polyp ... which was immediately referred to a consultant for surgical removal. I now undergo regular colonoscopies and am thankful that during same any bowel polyps are removed ... before they reach the pre-cancerous stage. I've undergone at least 12 colonoscopies during the last 20 yers ... and during each (bar one) polyps were always painlessly removed. There is a history of bowel cancer in my family ... thus likely a genetic propensity for same. Bowel cancers invariably start from small polyps which can develop into tumours.

    I know of other TZ members who owe their lives to prompt lower gut disorder treatments. If you have piles, especially if experiencing bleeding, please do not ignore any persistent symptoms. See a GP and pay attention to diet, exercise, sleep, and any 'excesses' which might be influencing your condition / symptoms.

    And ignore the usual music hall comments from those who think that tail end symptoms are something to joke about. They would not joke about e.g. nose bleeds, persistent migraines or toothache ... they only ridicule lower gut and tail-end problems

    BW

    dunk

    EDIT: Ref fibre ... The quantity of dietary fibre is not as important as the variety / types of fibre ... because the many hundreds of different types of gut microbes require different types of fibre to flourish and thus boost the microbiome. Fibre variety can be introduced via: oat bran, wheat bran, rice bran ... thus wholemeal bread, brown rice, porridge oats; also milled linseed and other milled seeds and fruits; chopped citrus peels (add to porridge); mixed nuts ... chopped or whole; whole vegetables i.e. with skins on e,g., jacket potatoes and whole sweet potatoes; all salad vegetables ... supermarket mixed salad leaves offer good variety; avocado and mango skins are edible and good sources of fibre when chopped .. as are chopped banana skins ... but all in moderation. Don't overdo the fibre as it will likely cause excess 'gas' until the gut (i.e the gut microbes) become used to their revised diet. A quarter of a whole banana skin chopped and microwaved is delicious with mixed fruit . Any gas and bloating should settle down after a few days ... but is to be expected when additional fibre is first introduced. And the variety of gut microbes can be improved by consumng Kefir products ... which are special yogurts containing up to 40 different types of live 'gut friendly' microbes.

    The importance of fibre variety and the microbiome is explained in Prof. Tim Spector's book, 'The Diet Myth'. Never a week goes by when Tim Spector is not interviewed on Radio 4 regarding dietary matters ... and also Covid ... he is one of the UK's leading epidemiologosts. And Tim Spector's diet recommendations assist weight loss ... much of his Diet Myth book is aimed at weight loss but without excessive exercise and without resorting to low fat diets ... diet variety and sugar reduction is the key.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=the+die...l_85jj79gixk_e
    Last edited by sundial; 7th December 2020 at 02:16. Reason: additional info ref fibre
    "I know not how to abstain from reading" … Samuel Pepys

  9. #9
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    Nothing remotely humorous about the Chalfont’s

  10. #10
    Grand Master Seamaster73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    And ignore the usual music hall comments from those who think that tail end symptoms are something to joke about. They would not joke about e.g. nose bleeds, persistent migraines or toothache ... they only ridicule lower gut and tail-end problems.
    “Why should I have nothing when the man in the next bed has piles!”

  11. #11
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    PS .. don't try the fabled Trinity House lightship crew piles remedy ie home made suppositories made from chopped rope soaked in tar :(
    "I know not how to abstain from reading" … Samuel Pepys

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    Unfortunately too many people ridicule anything related to bowels, rectums and anuses. Too many ignorant people regard the lower digestive tracts as the body's 'dustbin' ... and all parts thereof as either unmentionables or items to joke about ... especially when discussing e.g. piles, fistulas, haemotomas, prolapses, constipation etc. etc. But little do they know of how the lower gut's digestive processes influence our microbiome and immune system ... and thus healing. There are many articles available online documenting the importance of the human microbiome and how it can be 'tuned up' to improve our health.

    Surgery is not necessary for all cases of piles/ haemorrhoids and there is much that can be done to ease the problem via diet ... e.g., introducing soluble and insoluble types of dietary fibre ... which are digested by the millions of gut flora and thus boost the microbiome ... and, to put it bluntly, 'give the bowels something to grip on' ... thus easing digested food transit and a person's propensity to piles / haemorrhoids. But straining when passing stools is not the only cause of piles ... poor sitting posture, lack of exercise, smoking, alcohol, and genetics also influence an individual's propensity for developing haemorrhoids.

    Piles should not be ignored and professional medical advice should be sought ... especially if accompanied by bleeding which can be indicative of e.g. polyps as well as piles.

    Using topical remedies for piles e.g. Anusol, might relieve the symptoms ... but long term might not be a solution ... especially if a sufferer has not addressed his / her poor diet, smoking, alcohol consumption and lack of exercise.

    Sufferers are often reluctant to seek professional medical advice ... partly because it can be a 'taboo' subject and others you confide in treat it as a joke and 'make fun' of the symptoms. Also, the prospect of a rectal examination can be daunting ... but it's a relatively painless procedure and takes less than 30 seconds.

    One GP may have saved my life when I consulted him about persistent rectal bleeding ... he did a rectal examination and discovered not a pile, but what transpired to be a 'ripe' pre-cancerous polyp ... which was immediately referred to a consultant for surgical removal. I now undergo regular colonoscopies and am thankful that during same any bowel polyps are removed ... before they reach the pre-cancerous stage. I've undergone at least 12 colonoscopies during the last 20 yers ... and during each (bar one) polyps were always painlessly removed. There is a history of bowel cancer in my family ... thus likely a genetic propensity for same. Bowel cancers invariably start from small polyps which can develop into tumours.

    I know of other TZ members who owe their lives to prompt lower gut disorder treatments. If you have piles, especially if experiencing bleeding, please do not ignore any persistent symptoms. See a GP and pay attention to diet, exercise, sleep, and any 'excesses' which might be influencing your condition / symptoms.

    And ignore the usual music hall comments from those who think that tail end symptoms are something to joke about. They would not joke about e.g. nose bleeds, persistent migraines or toothache ... they only ridicule lower gut and tail-end problems

    BW

    dunk

    EDIT: Ref fibre ... The quantity of dietary fibre is not as important as the variety / types of fibre ... because the many hundreds of different types of gut microbes require different types of fibre to flourish and thus boost the microbiome. Fibre variety can be introduced via: oat bran, wheat bran, rice bran ... thus wholemeal bread, brown rice, porridge oats; also milled linseed and other milled seeds and fruits; chopped citrus peels (add to porridge); mixed nuts ... chopped or whole; whole vegetables i.e. with skins on e,g., jacket potatoes and whole sweet potatoes; all salad vegetables ... supermarket mixed salad leaves offer good variety; avocado and mango skins are edible and good sources of fibre when chopped .. as are chopped banana skins ... but all in moderation. Don't overdo the fibre as it will likely cause excess 'gas' until the gut (i.e the gut microbes) become used to their revised diet. A quarter of a whole banana skin chopped and microwaved is delicious with mixed fruit . Any gas and bloating should settle down after a few days ... but is to be expected when additional fibre is first introduced. And the variety of gut microbes can be improved by consumng Kefir products ... which are special yogurts containing up to 40 different types of live 'gut friendly' microbes.

    The importance of fibre variety and the microbiome is explained in Prof. Tim Spector's book, 'The Diet Myth' . Never a week goes by when Tim Spector is not interviewed on Radio 4 regarding dietary matters ... and also Covid ... he is one of the UK's leading epidemiologosts.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=the+die...l_85jj79gixk_e
    Yes I agree with all of that but anyone who reads this please look after yourselves.

    Last Friday my wife (Sue) got out of bed and just sat on the edge of the mattress staring at the clock radio. I turned over and asked her if everything was ok and she whispered yes, so I turned over and carried on snoozing. Ten minutes later I turned over and she was still staring at the clock and I asked her again if everything was ok, no answer. I got up, walked around and she was still staring at the clock, I asked again if everything was ok and she answered yes and told me to leave her alone which I did. Five minutes later she was still staring at the clock and I was now getting worried and rang for an ambulance. To cut a long story short, she was having a TIA and a couple of hours later she had a full blown stroke.

    Due to COVID restrictions I could not see her until 4.00pm. To see someone who you have lived with for 49 years lying on a bed, totally unable to move with a drooped face is the worst experience you can imagine, it was a living hell.

    Fortunately she seems to be on the mend, but her recovery, even if it takes place is likely to be months away and I am living with the guilt of not telephoning the ambulance quicker. Her life has been totally turned upside down and may have been prevented if I had just picked up the telephone a bit quicker.

    Haemorrhoids may be a funny subject but ignoring them can lead to awful situations, so don't risk it, just play safe and consult the quack.

    You are a short time living and a long time dead, so do the sensible thing and look after yourselves.

  13. #13
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick P View Post
    Yes I agree with all of that but anyone who reads this please look after yourselves.

    Last Friday my wife (Sue) got out of bed and just sat on the edge of the mattress staring at the clock radio. I turned over and asked her if everything was ok and she whispered yes, so I turned over and carried on snoozing. Ten minutes later I turned over and she was still staring at the clock and I asked her again if everything was ok, no answer. I got up, walked around and she was still staring at the clock, I asked again if everything was ok and she answered yes and told me to leave her alone which I did. Five minutes later she was still staring at the clock and I was now getting worried and rang for an ambulance. To cut a long story short, she was having a TIA and a couple of hours later she had a full blown stroke.

    Due to COVID restrictions I could not see her until 4.00pm. To see someone who you have lived with for 49 years lying on a bed, totally unable to move with a drooped face is the worst experience you can imagine, it was a living hell.

    Fortunately she seems to be on the mend, but her recovery, even if it takes place is likely to be months away and I am living with the guilt of not telephoning the ambulance quicker. Her life has been totally turned upside down and may have been prevented if I had just picked up the telephone a bit quicker.

    Haemorrhoids may be a funny subject but ignoring them can lead to awful situations, so don't risk it, just play safe and consult the quack.

    You are a short time living and a long time dead, so do the sensible thing and look after yourselves.
    Mick, Very sorry to hear about your wife's stroke; you did everything possible and hopefully managed to get her into hospital before the stroke. Wishing you both well and best wishes for a full recovery ... good luck.

    BW

    dunk
    "I know not how to abstain from reading" … Samuel Pepys

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick P View Post
    Yes I agree with all of that but anyone who reads this please look after yourselves.

    Last Friday my wife (Sue) got out of bed and just sat on the edge of the mattress staring at the clock radio. I turned over and asked her if everything was ok and she whispered yes, so I turned over and carried on snoozing. Ten minutes later I turned over and she was still staring at the clock and I asked her again if everything was ok, no answer. I got up, walked around and she was still staring at the clock, I asked again if everything was ok and she answered yes and told me to leave her alone which I did. Five minutes later she was still staring at the clock and I was now getting worried and rang for an ambulance. To cut a long story short, she was having a TIA and a couple of hours later she had a full blown stroke.

    Due to COVID restrictions I could not see her until 4.00pm. To see someone who you have lived with for 49 years lying on a bed, totally unable to move with a drooped face is the worst experience you can imagine, it was a living hell.

    Fortunately she seems to be on the mend, but her recovery, even if it takes place is likely to be months away and I am living with the guilt of not telephoning the ambulance quicker. Her life has been totally turned upside down and may have been prevented if I had just picked up the telephone a bit quicker.

    Haemorrhoids may be a funny subject but ignoring them can lead to awful situations, so don't risk it, just play safe and consult the quack.

    You are a short time living and a long time dead, so do the sensible thing and look after yourselves.
    Genuinely sorry to hear that Mick.
    Hope your wife has a full recovery.
    A tough time I’m sure.

  15. #15
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    So sorry to hear that Mick and wishing Mrs P a speedy recovery. I know it's difficult as we've been through this with the FIL but please remember that she could have had the TIA as soon as she went to bed and then the full stroke through the night and you'd not have been awake to help her. You did everything you could reasonable be expected to do in what sounds like a space of just minutes. Was it a clot? We're they able to administer the clot-busting drug?

    Take care both of you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mick P View Post
    Yes I agree with all of that but anyone who reads this please look after yourselves.

    Last Friday my wife (Sue) got out of bed and just sat on the edge of the mattress staring at the clock radio. I turned over and asked her if everything was ok and she whispered yes, so I turned over and carried on snoozing. Ten minutes later I turned over and she was still staring at the clock and I asked her again if everything was ok, no answer. I got up, walked around and she was still staring at the clock, I asked again if everything was ok and she answered yes and told me to leave her alone which I did. Five minutes later she was still staring at the clock and I was now getting worried and rang for an ambulance. To cut a long story short, she was having a TIA and a couple of hours later she had a full blown stroke.

    Due to COVID restrictions I could not see her until 4.00pm. To see someone who you have lived with for 49 years lying on a bed, totally unable to move with a drooped face is the worst experience you can imagine, it was a living hell.

    Fortunately she seems to be on the mend, but her recovery, even if it takes place is likely to be months away and I am living with the guilt of not telephoning the ambulance quicker. Her life has been totally turned upside down and may have been prevented if I had just picked up the telephone a bit quicker.

    Haemorrhoids may be a funny subject but ignoring them can lead to awful situations, so don't risk it, just play safe and consult the quack.

    You are a short time living and a long time dead, so do the sensible thing and look after yourselves.

  16. #16
    Mick, really sorry to hear of your wife's stroke. Don't blame yourself, you're not at fault. I wish her a speedy recovery.

  17. #17
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    Sorry to hear that Mick and hope she recovers quick.

    Damn good job you was persistent and kept checking on her.

    Take care

  18. #18
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    Gents

    Thanks for the messages, it is much appreciated. The point I want to make that there is no comparison in having a few medical checks against having to endure a life changing event.

    Just look after yourselves more.

  19. #19
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Following my above December 6 post I was recently called in by the local endoscopy clinic for another colonoscopy ... 15 months after the previous January 2020 examination when 3 bowel polyps were removed. The March colonoscopy revealed 2 more bowel polyps one of which was a pedunculated 'mushroom' type and thus easy to lasso and painlessly remove ... but the other was a 'sessile' polyp within the bowel wall which required injection to inflate it before a lasso could be applied and the growth removed. Sessile polyps can have a higher risk of being pre-cancerous and are more difficult to see during a colonoscopy examination. This was the second sessile type polyp discovered in my gut during the last 20 years and I'm thankful they were painlessly removed during relatively simple outpatient procedures before they developed further. Because of my bowel polyp record and the family's bowel cancer history, I'm now 'on the list' for regular 3 yearly colonoscopies ... but if any symptoms develop e.g bleeding, I can request another immediate examination. For many people, bowel examinations are a daunting prospect - partly because of the ignorance and stigma associated with bowel related issues. There is far too much 'taboo' surrounding bowel problems but they're nothing to be ashamed of ... we all have digestive 'plumbing' and we cannot function without same. Until you've had a colonoscopy and witnessed, 'on the screen' next to the examination table, the totally empty bowel as the endoscope travels through it, you will not realise just what a marvellous piece of plumbing the large colon is. Nothing is 'funny' about it ... nothing is 'nasty' ... it's an essential part of of our digestive system. If you have a bowel / rectum / anus problem, please do not be hesitant about consulting a doctor ... they are well used to discussing same and nowadays most bowel related issues can be fast tracked and likely quickly and painlessly remedied. I've had approx. 13 colonoscopies during the last 23 years and am still here ... if I had not sought treatments I might not be. Nowadays colonoscopies are less uncomfortable because 'carbon dioxide' gas is used to partially inflate the bowel as an aid to 'scope examination ... instead of using 'air'. Carbon dioxide is easily absorbed into the blood stream and thus quickly expelled via the body's respiratory system ... which results in minimum post-colonoscopy gut discomfort.
    Last edited by sundial; 11th May 2021 at 10:23. Reason: typo
    "I know not how to abstain from reading" … Samuel Pepys

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by lughugger View Post
    Surgery. Suffered for 15 years, not looked back in the last 15 years.


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app


    This. Get them banded and stitched back up, then live a happy life again

  21. #21
    Master Harry Smith's Avatar
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    Both my parents had piles, my father had 2 surgeries to remove them. One of his great anecdotes was of the occasion when one of his 'friends' recommended Deep Heat as an anal application.
    My mother was a tyrant and termagant who believed everyone should 'move their bowels' daily, religiously and I would have to sit straining and grunting until something was forthcoming every morning or at night if no earlier result. I had my first pile at age 15, there followed 30 odd years of misery, thanks mother, you bitch.
    I tried every self remedy possible and nothing really worked apart from lidocaine to numb the area and codeine to relieve the deep soul-destroying agony in your colon when another blood vessel fails and balloons up there.
    So in 2004 I decided to utilise my Wife's comprehensive Family BUPA and get them removed privately at the local Nuffield.
    Lovely place, great facilities. But when I awoke from surgery it felt like I had been raped by Ron Jeremy wearing a barb wire condom.
    Due to the nature of the op it wasn't possible for them to stitch up the wounds and it was necessary to keep the sphincter open and functioning or it could heal leaving a very small hole and possible further intervention.
    I rate the next few weeks after that as probably the worst of my life. I became addicted to Tramadol and Codeine, literally. The only way I could relieve myself without screaming or passing out was to sit in a bath of freezing cold water, a bath of blood and dung. For the first time in my life I actually contemplated suicide.
    I rarely get any pain or bleeding now, I keep my diet balanced and never strain. Any hint of constipation and I have a Movicol. But diarrhoea can also cause the condition to worsen.
    I would definitely recommend the procedure to my worst enemy.

  22. #22
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    ^^^ Sounds as if your op. was done by an 'old fashioned' surgeon using traditional 'apple coring' technology following which a rubber bung with a tube is left inside the rectum for up to a week or so. Nowadays there are better ways of remedying haemorrhoids ... e.g. 'stapling' which sounds horrendous but patients are discharged from hospital the day after the op ... or on the same day ... and with little risk of post-op. stenosis (narrowing).
    Last edited by sundial; 11th May 2021 at 15:01. Reason: typo
    "I know not how to abstain from reading" … Samuel Pepys

  23. #23
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    No Viz style giggling from me on this one, my grandfather suffered terribly with piles and I give daily thanks to Providence that my own digestive transit and function works smoothly and is (so far) trouble free. Certainly I think that our society's deep social taboo around discussing the colon, rectum and anus is unhelpful, and must inhibit loads of people from seeking treatment which could be beneficial, or life-saving.

    Mick - I'm sorry to read of your wife's TIA and I hope that she recovers well, and rapidly.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by PreacherCain View Post
    No Viz style giggling from me on this one, my grandfather suffered terribly with piles and I give daily thanks to Providence that my own digestive transit and function works smoothly and is (so far) trouble free. Certainly I think that our society's deep social taboo around discussing the colon, rectum and anus is unhelpful, and must inhibit loads of people from seeking treatment which could be beneficial, or life-saving.

    Mick - I'm sorry to read of your wife's TIA and I hope that she recovers well, and rapidly.
    Mick's post dates from December. I hope his wife is recovering.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  25. #25
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Mick's post dates from December. I hope his wife is recovering.
    So it does. Ah well, the sentiment stands.

  26. #26
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    I too have suffered from piles as well as an anal fissure for most of my adult life, both of which cause extreme discomfort.

    Movements occasionally become difficult for no apparent reason even though I have a balanced diet with a moderate amount of exercise and certainly a lot more before lockdown.

    In terms of remedies, I’ve been prescribed proctosedyl ointment/suppositories, which do shrink and finish the piles as well as providing much needed pain relief.
    For my recurring fissure, I am prescribed Diltiziem Cream (Anoheal), which is a steroid based ointment that relaxes the skin around the ‘torn’ area enabling it to heal, albeit slowly.

    Like many others, I seldom talk to anyone about these issues as those who do not understand just want to make fun of things, which really doesn’t help! So, I am glad I saw this post as it is nice to be able to share and also learn about these issues.


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  27. #27
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    Due to family history we've had quite a lot die from bowel cancer(mum at 42 dad at 64) our gp was on the ball while checking old files and put myself and sister in the high risk category so from the age of 30 I've had a colonoscopy every 3 years. I'm due number 6 soon as it was put off due to covid .
    I've been lucky so far and had a clean bill all those years although I do get the odd nobby stiles from time to time so I sympathize with you op.



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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick P View Post
    Gents

    Thanks for the messages, it is much appreciated. The point I want to make that there is no comparison in having a few medical checks against having to endure a life changing event.

    Just look after yourselves more.
    Can't agree more. Couple of years ago I was having a bit of a problem and passing it off until Mrs S insisted I go to doc. Turned out it was prostat cancer and it was caugjt just in time to be fixe0d with radiotherapy.

    Don't put things off c9s' you never know.

    Glad to hear your wife on mend.

  29. #29
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    5,117
    I have only just picked this up, but yes it is 5 months since she had the stroke, so thanks for the comments.

    The recovery process takes about 18 months and there is no knowing as to whether the recovery will be full or partial. So far she is doing well and I make sure that she gets a trip out doors most days just to get her out out the house. Anything that makes her walk around on a stick is the best therapy going. Going to garden centres may be a bit twee but it gets her thinking about bringing more wildlife into the and all the bird feeders we have now hanging up is is now bringing in squirrels by the dozen.

    The main thing about something like this is that once you are passed 60, you really have to say to yourself, I don't know how long I got left of a useful life so I am going to make the most of it. So indulge yourself and do the things you enjoy. If you want to buy that special watch, just buy it, if you like going out to eat, become a gourmet, if you like travel either abroad or within the UK, just do it. Also if you want to do something useful, do charity work, anything that makes you feel good is now the name of the game.

    I am certainly pleased about spending six months in Spain for the last years in the sunny weather.

    Just look after yourself.
    Last edited by Mick P; 12th May 2021 at 09:18.

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