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Thread: Loctite

  1. #1
    Craftsman Kaffe's Avatar
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    Loctite

    Any recommendations for what type of loctite to use for bracelet screws. There appears to be many different types of the stuff. Also, is it best to put the loctite on the pin hole or on the screw itself? Advice would be most welcome. Thanks.

  2. #2

    Loctite

    I canít remember the number. It might be 222? From what I remember donít put it on the end of the screw and then push the screw through all the holes in the links as the locktite will gather on them causing the bracelet to be less supple.


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  3. #3
    Grand Master GraniteQuarry's Avatar
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    Nail varnish works well too; I find on the threads is less messy.

  4. #4
    Craftsman Kaffe's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. I'll order some up. Cheers.

  5. #5
    Craftsman TheGent's Avatar
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    I use Loctite 243 and have for years with no failures yet. Itís medium strength so can be undone when needed.


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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by GraniteQuarry View Post
    Nail varnish works well too; I find on the threads is less messy.
    Do you mean on the female threads or on the threads of the actual screw?


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  7. #7
    Grand Master magirus's Avatar
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    I use the 222 after a near miss . . .



  8. #8
    Grand Master GraniteQuarry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stonewood View Post
    Do you mean on the female threads or on the threads of the actual screw?
    Threads on the screw or screw bar; never had one come loose yet.

  9. #9
    Craftsman Kaffe's Avatar
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    Well, I've ordered some 222. If it's no good then the spanking sessions will begin! :)
    Thanks for the advice guys.
    Last edited by Kaffe; 27th November 2020 at 23:36.

  10. #10
    Master
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    I used the blue on my Randolphs and other small screw.



    https://www.henkel-adhesives.com/uk/...adlockers.html

  11. #11
    Sinn supply this - itís blue!
    Itís classed as medium strength. Made by weiconlock




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  12. #12
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    Question How tite?

    Quote Originally Posted by notenoughwrists View Post
    Sinn supply this - it’s blue!
    It’s classed as medium strength. Made by weiconlock
    Is Locktite 222 (or the Sinn equal?) permanent? Or does it just make it harder for unintentional loosening?

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by davidzet View Post
    Is Locktite 222 (or the Sinn equal?) permanent? Or does it just make it harder for unintentional loosening?
    Just harder - still remain easy enough to remove with a screwdriver but fixed enough not to loosen under wear or vibration


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  14. #14
    Grand Master
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    I still continue to recommend applying heat to screws that have been treated with threadlock. I learned this lesson the hard way, having paid around £40 to buy the tool for removing Omega SMP helium valve bodies I snapped the bloody thing by applying too much force. Application of heat is essential to remove these, the threadlock is strong but softens with heat. Same applies to some bracelet screws, with experience you can tell when theyíre tight due to threadlock when the screw doesnít yield to sensible pressure. I used to use the gas hob in my kitchen, a couple of seconds in the tip of a flame does the trick, quicker than getting the microburner out of its box. A cig lighter would do the trick nicely too.

  15. #15
    Grand Master JasonM's Avatar
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    The tip of a soldering iron is much better for direct control on a small point.
    Cheers..
    Jase

  16. #16
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonM View Post
    The tip of a soldering iron is much better for direct control on a small point.
    True! I had to resort to the soldering iron to separate the pipe of a centre seconds chronograph hand from the chronograph runner, the hand had been superglued. Couldnít get the chrono runner out because the broken pipe was stopping it, couldnít risk a naked flame so close to the movement.......soldering iron did the trick but it was bloody tricky.

  17. #17
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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by notenoughwrists View Post
    Just harder - still remain easy enough to remove with a screwdriver but fixed enough not to loosen under wear or vibration
    Thanks!!

  18. #18
    Good 'tip' from Jason.
    Last edited by Bry1975; 16th December 2020 at 16:03.

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