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Thread: Eyesight

  1. #1
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    Eyesight

    I've worn glasses for more than 30 years now and worn varifocals for at least 20 years. I had my eyes tested and new glasses last December, all was fine until a few weeks ago when I started to struggle finding the "sweet spot" and then I discovered that it was clearer watching the television without my glasses than it was with them. I had another eye test about a month ago and it revealed that I now need no correction for my distance vision. Has anyone else had this happen and why does it happen?

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  2. #2
    This happened to me following a diabetes type 2 diagnosis! However, as I got my blood sugar levels down and got it into remission my poor eyesight returned.

    Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Master Arcam's Avatar
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    I would imagine it is related to pressure applied to the eyes that is "correcting them" which is distorting the lens slightly.

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  4. #4
    Did the optician not comment on the change? Perhaps a call back to them to discuss it.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  5. #5
    Craftsman
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    Hi Eddie, Like you I have been wearing varifocals for about 30 years with my distance vision getting worse very slowly. At my last eye test 18 months ago there was a change in that my distance vision had improved instead of getting worse. I queried this with the optician and was assured that there was nothing wrong with my eyes and that this often happened as we get older. If my vision had improved as dramatically as yours I would certainly want an explanation. Did you have the additional more in depth scan that they can now do ?. Hope this helps.
    Pete Jones

  6. #6
    Grand Master WORKSIMON's Avatar
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    https://www.quora.com/As-I-age-my-ey...-you-get-older

    Quite an interesting answer above.
    Cheers

    Simon



    Ralph Waldo Emerson: We ask for long life, but 'tis deep life, or noble moments that signify. Let the measure of time be spiritual, not mechanical.

  7. #7
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonah View Post
    Hi Eddie, Like you I have been wearing varifocals for about 30 years with my distance vision getting worse very slowly. At my last eye test 18 months ago there was a change in that my distance vision had improved instead of getting worse. I queried this with the optician and was assured that there was nothing wrong with my eyes and that this often happened as we get older. If my vision had improved as dramatically as yours I would certainly want an explanation. Did you have the additional more in depth scan that they can now do ?. Hope this helps.
    Pete Jones
    They carried out a very thorough examination of my eyes which didn't reveal anything requiring further investigation other than mild cataracts which don't yet require treatment.

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  8. #8
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Hi Eddie

    As I understand it, a degree of short-sightedness can correct itself with age.

    I believe it's called presbyopia.

    I was told this might happen to me about 30 years ago, so it must be fairly common.

    Edit - if you've had your eyes checked then I think it's a lower level of flexibility in the eye itself which presents this phenomenon.

  9. #9
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    Hi Eddie

    As I understand it, a degree of short-sightedness can correct itself with age.

    I believe it's called presbyopia.

    I was told this might happen to me about 30 years ago, so it must be fairly common.

    Edit - if you've had your eyes checked then I think it's a lower level of flexibility in the eye itself which presents this phenomenon.
    The above is my understanding, at each eye test over the last 10 years the optician has said my short sightedness ( distance) is improving and my reading deteriorating slighly. They also said it was due to the eye muscle weakening slightly which Allows the lens to focus better for distance.

    There has to be some benefit of age.

  10. #10
    Master blackal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swanbourne View Post
    They carried out a very thorough examination of my eyes which didn't reveal anything requiring further investigation other than mild cataracts which don't yet require treatment.

    Eddie

    The link in post No6 appears to link it with cataract development.

    Maybe go for lens replacement sooner rather than later to reap the benefits?

  11. #11
    Master
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    No idea how true it is but I did read somewhere that it was a softening of the cornea that comes with age. I suppose that could fit in with the flexibility mentioned earlier.

  12. #12
    This thread needs David L

  13. #13
    Master
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    It's like buses!!

    Quote Originally Posted by swanbourne View Post
    They carried out a very thorough examination of my eyes which didn't reveal anything requiring further investigation other than mild cataracts which don't yet require treatment.

    Eddie
    This is probably the answer. As you get older the crystalline lens gets more yellow and opaque and less flexible. The former alters how the light passes through it which in turn alters your spectacle prescription. The latter is why you become presbyopic and need to do something different to read, be it take your glasses off and/or get varifocals or reading glasses. The good news is that it is perfectly normal but the bad news is that it will continue year on year. Each time your new spectacles will improve your vision but, and crucially, your best vision isn't quite as good as your best vision was the year before. This can go on for some time, anything from a couple to 20 years. Eventually you will need the cataracts removed. In theory any age related lens opacity can be called a cataract but I can find these in the over 20s so we don't tend to.

    Quote Originally Posted by jpjsavage View Post
    This happened to me following a diabetes type 2 diagnosis! However, as I got my blood sugar levels down and got it into remission my poor eyesight returned.

    Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
    This is a possibility, I've seen it a number of times. If you feel you have any other symptoms, drinking more, urinating more etc then get your BS checked.

    There are a couple of other medical issues I can think of that would cause a change in prescription but this would have been flagged up by the examination.

    Ok to just correct a couple of undoubtedly well meaning people:
    Myopia does not get "corrected" by presbyopia, they are two completely unrelated things.
    Your basic prescription, however much or little and whether long (hyperopic) or short (myopic) sighted will vary as time goes by. Once you hit 40 something you will become presbyopic but this still means you are myopic/hyperopic etc and one does not affect the magnitude of the other.
    There is now the need to have your near vision corrected as well as your distance vision. So myopic people now take their glasses off to read and emetropic ( no prescription) or mildly hyperopic ones now need reading glasses.

    Corneas do not soften unless there is something properly wrong. Lenses however do change alot from 30+ onwards and this is where most of the changes that alter your spectacle prescription come from in this age group.

    There is no research that I'm aware of that suggests that wearing any sort of prescription lens has any effect on how your prescription changes or at what speed. Equally not wearing spectacles, even if you "need" them, does you no harm except you can't see or are uncomfortable. Stop doing that and the discomfort goes away but it doesn't make things worse.


    David
    Last edited by DavidL; 13th October 2020 at 20:31.

  14. #14
    It's like buses!!

    Theres a 3rd one David!

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