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Thread: Electric vehicles

  1. #1
    Master
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    Electric vehicles

    In the verge of signing at a really good deal on a fully electric smart car four two 18.1% of p11d over two years so happy with that but Iím keen to know if anyone has an electric vehicle how they charge thereís and if you have had a dedicated charging point installed along with any advice

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Craftsman
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    We had a pod point charger installed prior to our E-tron being delivered, it cost about £300 if I recall.
    We are looking at getting another electric car for my wife and have been looking at the Smart or the SEAT mii. The Smart is crazy cheap- about £150/ month on my company car scheme but the limited range put me off so will probably go with the SEAT or maybe the Renault Zoe.
    In the 8 months we have had the e-tron I have only used a public charger twice, you might use one more with the limited range of the Smart.


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  3. #3
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    I do the bulk of my charging at home on a 7kw OHME unit, and use Instavolt rapid chargers when on out of home return range trips.

    You can get an OLEV grant to part fund a dedicated charger, but itíll need to be connected to Wifi/Internet and be off road on your property to qualify.

    I just got an electrician to fit and certify a 32A CEEFORM socket and purchased an OHME EVSE myself, worked out about the same as an OLEV part funded install and no need for the connectivity.

    Iím not that familiar with the Smart four two, what battery size does it have and what charging rates does it accept?

    Owning an EV and having to rely only on public charging is not something Iíd consider unless I was a very low mileage driver.

  4. #4
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    I have attempted to buy a New Smart Fortwo Pulse Premium no less than 4 times from Stratstone Mercedes in Glasgow and Hamilton. Their customer service is so poor I thought better of the idea. Disappointed as I like the car. Enjoy!

  5. #5
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    Electric vehicles




    Really good deal works out at 18% over two years if you are looking is great value for a lease - I went for the premium version for £181 a month and will be perfect for the wife provided we get the charging point organised

    No idea what battery it takes I need to look into that but thanks for responses thus far


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    Last edited by R0bertb00th; 1st October 2020 at 09:20.

  6. #6
    Master thieuster's Avatar
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    Consider this - and I know I'm referring to Dutch power bills:

    A guy down the street is the happy (lease) owner of a Tesla X, the one with the gullwing doors. His monthly power bill (gas and electrics) has risen from 280 to 512 euros/month...

    He drives from where I live to Roesselaere in Belgium every day. A 3.5 hr single drive. Before he drove the Tesla, his boss was generous enough to offer him a student-driver to take him to and from Roesselaere in his - then lease car- BMW X5. But with a pair of strange ears'' in front of him, he didn't feel free when calling on the phone with clients. Now, with his Tesla, he programs the automatic driving function and the car takes him safely to where he wants to go. Not tired at all.

    Not Smart related, but still a nice story about modern electric cars!

    Menno
    Last edited by thieuster; 1st October 2020 at 09:18.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by R0bertb00th View Post



    Really good deal works out at 18% over two years if you are looking is great value for a lease - I went for the premium version for £181 a month and will be perfect for the wife provided we get the charging point organised

    No idea what battery it takes I need to look into that but thanks for responses thus far


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    Itís got a 17 kWh battery from your screenshot, so good for about 60 miles real world allowing a margin? Is that enough for your needs?

    It has 22 kw on board charging, so 3 phase, those public charge points are not so popular, most are 7kw if theyíre not rapid chargers.

    The 6 hour charge time suggests it also only charges at 3.3kw even on a 7kw wall box so bear that in mind when choosing one. You may as well get a 7kw one for future proofing.

  8. #8
    Master Xantiagib's Avatar
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    Indeed I would agreee get at least a 7.2kw 32A charger at home - if you can stretch to a 3-phase 11 or 22kw one - check the car can take it and this only seems to be easy if your build is already of three phase.

  9. #9
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    The mileage side of things is five, just really interested in the charging side of things to be honest.

    Thanks for the feedback not too sure what it means though ;)

    Seems to be so many options regards external charge points hard know where to start

  10. #10
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    The first thing to realise about electric cars is that the Ďchargersí are on the car.

    The things that you bolt to your house wall are actually Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSEs). The EVSE and the cars onboard charger have a Ďconversationí when you plug in during which itís established what the EVSE can supply and what the car can receive in terms of power input.

    Plug into a 3 phase AC 22kw public charger and youíll get max 22kw charge rate, so full in about 40-50 minutes from empty.

    Plug into a 7kw EVSE on a single phase supply, like at home, and on that car with its onboard charger youíll get 3.6kw max, or 6 hour recharge time from near empty.

    Some cars, like my e-Golf, canít charge at 22kw AC, but have 2 x 3.6kw onboard chargers combined to allow a 7.2kw charge rate on the home single phase 7kw EVSE.

    Itís a bit complex, but most new cars are emerging with 7kw home charging, and 50kw+ DC Rapid Charging, so things are standardising to an extent.

  11. #11
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    Don't do it, they do not sound like cars and there is no smell of petrol.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Tooks View Post
    The first thing to realise about electric cars is that the Ďchargersí are on the car.

    The things that you bolt to your house wall are actually Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSEs). The EVSE and the cars onboard charger have a Ďconversationí when you plug in during which itís established what the EVSE can supply and what the car can receive in terms of power input.

    Plug into a 3 phase AC 22kw public charger and youíll get max 22kw charge rate, so full in about 40-50 minutes from empty.

    Plug into a 7kw EVSE on a single phase supply, like at home, and on that car with its onboard charger youíll get 3.6kw max, or 6 hour recharge time from near empty.

    Some cars, like my e-Golf, canít charge at 22kw AC, but have 2 x 3.6kw onboard chargers combined to allow a 7.2kw charge rate on the home single phase 7kw EVSE.

    Itís a bit complex, but most new cars are emerging with 7kw home charging, and 50kw+ DC Rapid Charging, so things are standardising to an extent.
    I'd say the charger is the thing supplying electricity to the car. You've even contradicted yourself!

  13. #13
    Grand Master Dave+63's Avatar
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    AC charging, either 3.6kw or 7.2kw single phase (or 11/22kw 3 phase) use the carsí onboard charger, the charge points are just an EVSE (electrical supply).

    Rapid DC charging is the opposite; the charger is in the charge point rather than the vehicle.

    Thereís no contradiction, itís just that people mistakenly call the AC charge points chargers when they actually arenít.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    I'd say the charger is the thing supplying electricity to the car. You've even contradicted yourself!
    Yes, Iíve used the term that everybody calls them, ie chargers for your electric car, I was just trying to explain that itís the car as much as the thing you connect it to that sets the charge input rate.

    Edit: Dave said it more eloquently than me! :)

    Itís important because otherwise people plug their shiny new electric car into their shiny new 7kw home charge point (EVSE!) and wonder WTF itís doing only charging at half that rate.

  15. #15
    we have an Ipace, wife charges it at work for free, have a pod point at home but hardly use it

  16. #16
    Master
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    Iím even more confused now ha ha ha

    So to put the question in another way can anyone recommend what I should be looking to have installed in order to fast charge the car as opposed to a 3 pin plug and also where to get it from.

    Thanks again, I love TZ for this sort of stuff so much knowledge


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  17. #17
    Master Caruso's Avatar
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    I've had my i3 for nearly 2 years and have only used a normal 13amp socket to charge it slowly overnight. I occasionally use public chargers (Ecotricity) when doing long trips.

    I did buy a Type 2 charging cable but have never used it because all the public charging stations I've used have their own charging cables built in and I used the 13amp charger when at home.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by R0bertb00th View Post
    Iím even more confused now ha ha ha

    So to put the question in another way can anyone recommend what I should be looking to have installed in order to fast charge the car as opposed to a 3 pin plug and also where to get it from.

    Thanks again, I love TZ for this sort of stuff so much knowledge


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    It depends on the charging capability of your car, trickle charge, 7,2kw or 11KW, most people can only go to 7.2kw at home

  19. #19
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by R0bertb00th View Post
    Iím even more confused now ha ha ha

    So to put the question in another way can anyone recommend what I should be looking to have installed in order to fast charge the car as opposed to a 3 pin plug and also where to get it from.

    Thanks again, I love TZ for this sort of stuff so much knowledge


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    Youíll probably be eligible for an OLEV grant if it will be registered at your home address, so a site like this will give you some options around EVSEs.

    https://www.smarthomecharge.co.uk

    Your car will charge at 3.6kw max even connected to a 7.2kw EVSE, but thereís no point going for the lower rated one as it makes little difference to the price and youíre more future proof with the higher rate.

    Itís worth it for ensuring youíve got a safe long term supply sorted, with wiring thatís up to the task etc.

  20. #20
    Grand Master Dave+63's Avatar
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    As tools said, go for a 7.2kw charge point, preferably untethered.

    A tethered point will only allow cars with the same charge plug as yours to charge (probably type 2) whilst an untethered will allow those with other types to charge too.

    As an example, my Nissan uses a type 1 and Iíve a tethered charge point so my daughter with her new MG canít charge her car at our home as her car uses a type 2. If I had an untethered charge point we could both charge using our own leads (although not simultaneously).

  21. #21
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    We installed a Rolec 7kw charger with lots of cabling and an earth spike so it's all tickety boo.

    I had, however, asked for a Rolex for my birthday, sigh...

  22. #22
    Just bought an i3 yesterday

    Charges lovely on the 3pin granny charger via an extension highlighted for phev use from wickes fir a mere £20

    Long term i bay consider a charge point, but if I ever back to our office itís free charging with loads of points in the car park as we are an energy firm!


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  23. #23
    Journeyman
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    All depends on your usage.

    My commute is 40 miles each way.
    I'm seriously considering the X5 PHEV for my next car because of the tax benefits and also because by charging at work and home I should be able to do 80% of my commute using electric....... then the 3L petrol kicks in...... 🙄

  24. #24
    Master Pitch3110's Avatar
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    Four weeks in tomorrow of life with a Tesla Model 3 Performance.

    Performance and tech to one side and purely looking at Economics and general living with I could not be happier.

    I have all apart from two occasions used home charging via a Tesla unit which gives me 25-30 miles per hour. I used an Ionity public charger last week which was one of the newer contactless pay ones and that was easy to use.

    Today I broke my Tesla Supercharger virginity and it was even simpler and free.

    Regards home, it is just getting into the habit of pugging in before you walk away from the car. I have my Igloo EV App set to have the car fully charged before 6:30am and it finds the cleanest energy and gives me 100 free miles a month for the privilege.

    I do have a granny charging lead and I will do a dummy run to see what the charge is and if I could manage with it. I think most days I could.

    The financial side is just nuts when I think it equates to filing up £1.20’ish per gallon of diesel.

    I mentioned on my Tesla thread that I have been a real petrelhead but I am a complete convert to EV driving, the sheer brutal power and it is the most relaxing drive ever.

    Pitch

  25. #25
    Had a BMW i8 for about 6 months until it was it and totaled. More of a hybrid with the electric motor powering the front wheels and an almost useless range of less than 25 miles on electric alone. Got more from the insurance company then I paid for it though. Drove a Tesla and would never own one. For me it was uncomfortable and I am not too keen on someone being able to turn my car on and off with the push of a button.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by koimaster View Post
    Had a BMW i8 for about 6 months until it was it and totaled. More of a hybrid with the electric motor powering the front wheels and an almost useless range of less than 25 miles on electric alone. Got more from the insurance company then I paid for it though. Drove a Tesla and would never own one. For me it was uncomfortable and I am not too keen on someone being able to turn my car on and off with the push of a button.
    To be fair most modern cars could be turned on / off / hacked as they have multiple wireless technologies from TPMS to bluetooth, to wifi. It's just that Tesla have firmly embraced this concept whilst other manufacturers (aside from perhaps mclaren) have not. Certainly your i8 could have been.

  27. #27
    Master Alansmithee's Avatar
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    Boris Johnson is understood to be planning to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars within a decade, with reports that the ban will be brought forward by five years.


    It follows the prime minister moving the cut-off date from 2040 to 2035 in February.


    Johnson is expected to announce the measure amid a raft of new environmental policies next week, according to a report in the Financial Times, which attributes the news to industry and Whitehall sources.


    The government hopes the policy will energise the market for electric cars in the UK and help the country achieve its climate targets, including reducing emissions of greenhouse gases to net zero by 2050.


    Scientists, academics and campaigners have urged governments and businesses to be more ambitious, calling on them to work to ďrestore the climateĒ to as safe a level as possible.
    https://www.theguardian.com/environm...cars-from-2030

  28. #28
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    Did you take the plunge in the end OP? Iím still looking for a good deal on a Prime Exclusive Fortwo.

  29. #29
    Master Pitch3110's Avatar
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    Honestly chaps two and a bit months in and I will not by choice jump back into a ICE motor.

    I can’t talk highly enough of Tesla, is the car zero of faults, hell no, but the tech and experience is streets ahead of the Germans.

    My M3P is at the Chelmsford SC for a couple of jobs and the whole service experience is a refreshing change from nearly 20 years of Audi and BMW waffle.

    ALL the major car manufacturers, the big German ones in particular have been caught well and truly with their pants down.

    I have a Model S loaner and it is far nicer than my experience with new A6, latest Q7 and 5 Series.
    Pitch

  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by koimaster View Post
    Had a BMW i8 for about 6 months until it was it and totaled. More of a hybrid with the electric motor powering the front wheels and an almost useless range of less than 25 miles on electric alone. Got more from the insurance company then I paid for it though. Drove a Tesla and would never own one. For me it was uncomfortable and I am not too keen on someone being able to turn my car on and off with the push of a button.
    Iím seriously considering an i8 as a 2021 purchase. If I can work the man maths I think it could be my first expensive ish car purchase in quite a while. Should be easy enough to fit me daily drive on full electric, especially if I went for a later model with the larger battery.
    It's just a matter of time...

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pitch3110 View Post
    Honestly chaps two and a bit months in and I will not by choice jump back into a ICE motor.

    I canít talk highly enough of Tesla, is the car zero of faults, hell no, but the tech and experience is streets ahead of the Germans.

    My M3P is at the Chelmsford SC for a couple of jobs and the whole service experience is a refreshing change from nearly 20 years of Audi and BMW waffle.

    ALL the major car manufacturers, the big German ones in particular have been caught well and truly with their pants down.

    I have a Model S loaner and it is far nicer than my experience with new A6, latest Q7 and 5 Series.
    Pitch
    I donít know enough Tesla owners to know whether your experience is typical of most but of the 3 Model 3 owners I know, all had paint and panel alignment issues upon collection (purchased within the last 2 years). I was really keen to buy one at the beginning of this year but their experiences really put me off. For £40k plus, I would expect a fault-free new car upon collection. Iím sure Iíll take the plunge within the next 5 years but Iím hoping that by then, theyíll maybe have a different point of sale set-up.

  32. #32
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    I wouldnít go back to having an ICE car either after 9 months with my E-tron. In fact we are looking to get another EV as a runabout as soon as the order books for the Seat Mii reopen.
    There is a lot of tech on these new cars though and whilst drivetrain issues are rare I think electrical issues are likely to be more common. On my E-tron the rear light started flickering recently, but was sorted quickly by Audi Assist, who came out and replaced it on my driveway.


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  33. #33
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    Well I love my Smart EQ. Real world range for me is 70 miles.
    Itís my second car which I use for running round the village and my commute to the train station. My ďproperĒ car is a Disco 4 which frankly drinks diesel on short runs so I save a fortune on running costs.
    The battery is small enough to make 2kwh charging via the supplied granny cable over night completely viable so if you donít currently have a wall box I wouldnít stress too much.

    Oh and itís fantastic fun. Like a dodgem car on nitrous! 😁


  34. #34
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    As an aside.

    The one thing Iíve noticed is your driving style really changes with an EV. In particular your anticipation is greatly heightened and as a result of regen braking ďone pedalĒ driving becomes very much the norm.

    I would imagine the manufacturers of brake discs and pads must be busily re-thinking their business model as the frequency of replacement is going to plummet as adoption of EVís grow.

  35. #35
    Grand Master Dave+63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barney12 View Post
    As an aside.

    The one thing Iíve noticed is your driving style really changes with an EV. In particular your anticipation is greatly heightened and as a result of regen braking ďone pedalĒ driving becomes very much the norm.

    I would imagine the manufacturers of brake discs and pads must be busily re-thinking their business model as the frequency of replacement is going to plummet as adoption of EVís grow.
    Thatís certainly true of the smaller battery EVs along with a more relaxed driving style.

    Whether that continues to be the case as the batteries become larger and range increases, Iím not so sure.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barney12 View Post
    I would imagine the manufacturers of brake discs and pads must be busily re-thinking their business model as the frequency of replacement is going to plummet as adoption of EVís grow.
    Your car weighs 900kg, even in my MX-5 I don't use the brakes much because I can lift off and lose speed without touching them. I didn't see a figure for the weight of the new BMW monstrosity but it must be heading towards 3,000kg, I wonder how much the regen braking effect will slow that down (I genuinely don't know).
    "A man of little significance"

  37. #37
    Grand Master Dave+63's Avatar
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    Electric vehicles

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxy100 View Post
    Your car weighs 900kg, even in my MX-5 I don't use the brakes much because I can lift off and lose speed without touching them. I didn't see a figure for the weight of the new BMW monstrosity but it must be heading towards 3,000kg, I wonder how much the regen braking effect will slow that down (I genuinely don't know).
    It all depends on the size of the motors and how much regen is programmed in but thereís a lot of kinetic energy there ready to be converted back to electrical energy.

    In theory, the motor should be capable of slowing the vehicle down just as quickly as it can accelerate up to speed.

    In my motor, regenerated energy is generally about 1/3 of my total energy usage. Of course, there are a number of variables which can make a big difference.
    Last edited by Dave+63; 15th November 2020 at 10:02.

  38. #38
    I love my I3 Rex
    Feel very smug driving past fuel stations

    Real range is easily 100 miles on the electric and 90 on the back up fuel (never ever used it)
    Recharge in the granny charger or get a free charge where you can

    I might look at a bigger range vehicle next time as this is my first electric car - there are lots about

    Enjoyable to drive - super nippy when you need - spacious interior - and once I get a proper charging point in )if I bother) even easier


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  39. #39
    Master blackal's Avatar
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    My nephew leased a Nissan Leaf for his daily 68m (total) commute to Vodafone in Newbury. He got it charged for free at work and found it to be the perfect car for the job.

    His all-up costs per month, were less than the simple running costs of fuelling and taxing his parents' old 5-series. (even without buying the odd battery, tyres, etc)

    I think even without the free charging facility - it was a bit of a no-brainer.

    So many people, if they looked seriously at their usage - should do better financially than buying that new petrol/diesel car.

  40. #40
    Master Pitch3110's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTM84 View Post
    I don’t know enough Tesla owners to know whether your experience is typical of most but of the 3 Model 3 owners I know, all had paint and panel alignment issues upon collection (purchased within the last 2 years). I was really keen to buy one at the beginning of this year but their experiences really put me off. For £40k plus, I would expect a fault-free new car upon collection. I’m sure I’ll take the plunge within the next 5 years but I’m hoping that by then, they’ll maybe have a different point of sale set-up.
    Yes, one of my jobs is a piece of flat paint about the size of my palm and a panel gap which in the whole scheme of things for me is nothing on a close on £60k motor.

    The car is not perfect no car is, I have had to return the majority of new BMWs and Audi’s for odd bits, but the manner with which Tesla are dealing with these bits is superb, it is refreshing from the normal main dealer attitude of doing you a favour.

    Just a note on brakes above, the regen braking on the Model 3 is fantastic and way better than the Model S loaner I have. It is noticeable when cleaning how dust free the wheels are.

    Ta

    Pitch

  41. #41
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave+63 View Post
    It all depends on the size of the motors and how much regen is programmed in but thereís a lot of kinetic energy there ready to be converted back to electrical energy.

    In theory, the motor should be capable of slowing the vehicle down just as quickly as it can accelerate up to speed.

    In my motor, regenerated energy is generally about 1/3 of my total energy usage. Of course, there are a number of variables which can make a big difference.
    That's really interesting, thank you. I didn't know about the middle bit about slowing as quickly as it can accelerate.

    I've been really tempted by an i3. A friend of mine runs one and loves it and I can think of one journey in the last three years where four of us have gone further in one go than 100 miles (and then we'd just have to work out where to stop for a charge). Is there a booking system in place for chargers? I mean if I know I'm going to drive 100 miles and come back that same day can I book a charging slot at my destination? As much as I love petrol cars I understand why it's a good idea they go. While there are still environmental issues about battery-powered cars and presumably the nucluear power needed to produce the electricity to propel them I find things like the i3 really interesting. There's a link to watches in my head too - in the few years from 1969 we had the automatic chronograph, deep sea diving, electronic, quartz and digital watches. With the new technology came new designs (I'm thinking especially of Omega here, but Heuer too and so on). The i3 takes the new tech and builds the car around it in a very clever way. And it's something like seven years old and still relevant. The future of car design is very interesting. I'll even look at SUVs in a new light if they can make them sub-1,000kg.
    "A man of little significance"

  42. #42
    If I could afford to spend £60k on a car I wouldnít give a monkeys about fuel consumption, but I would expect perfect paint and panel gaps tbh!
    I donít know what to make of Tesla etc at the moment. Until someone builds a decent £10k basic electric, useable car I think itís still mostly the realm of car enthusiasts and the wealthy. My son and his friends are all in the process of learning to drive at the moment and ive been genuinely surprised at what under £5k will buy you as a runabout. Insurance is ruinously expensive in the first year, but I think it will be a long time before their generation dumps a cheap car with a loud exhaust and big wheels for an expensive electric option - todayís cheap Corsa is likely to be on the road driven by enthusiastic young drivers for another 15-20 years I suspect. I have to admit, Iíll be looking at the new electric golf/ID4 or whatever itís called to replace my current Tiguan in a couple of years as I realise I do a lot of small journeys (if they are the right price/any good) - supported by the 2015 golf diesel in the garage that will get 600 miles out of a tank for longer journeys, with £20 a year road tax. I donít think 10 years is long enough for the prices and advantages to trickle down to your average motorist but I may well be wrong, in fact I hope I am as it has to be better for the environment.

  43. #43
    Master Caruso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxy100 View Post
    That's really interesting, thank you. I didn't know about the middle bit about slowing as quickly as it can accelerate.

    I've been really tempted by an i3. A friend of mine runs one and loves it and I can think of one journey in the last three years where four of us have gone further in one go than 100 miles (and then we'd just have to work out where to stop for a charge). Is there a booking system in place for chargers? I mean if I know I'm going to drive 100 miles and come back that same day can I book a charging slot at my destination? As much as I love petrol cars I understand why it's a good idea they go. While there are still environmental issues about battery-powered cars and presumably the nucluear power needed to produce the electricity to propel them I find things like the i3 really interesting. There's a link to watches in my head too - in the few years from 1969 we had the automatic chronograph, deep sea diving, electronic, quartz and digital watches. With the new technology came new designs (I'm thinking especially of Omega here, but Heuer too and so on). The i3 takes the new tech and builds the car around it in a very clever way. And it's something like seven years old and still relevant. The future of car design is very interesting. I'll even look at SUVs in a new light if they can make them sub-1,000kg.
    The short answer is no you can't book chargers. However the charging networks have an app that tells you where the ones are near you and if they're in use. The i3 REX with it's on board generator means if you get caught low on charge you can keep going on petrol till you find somewhere you can charge.

  44. #44
    Craftsman
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    I was pleasantly surprised about the general availability of rapid chargers (50kw+) on a recent weekend break we had in Norfolk, including this place where they had 8 125kw chargers and I was the only one using any of them!




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  45. #45
    I think itís time the government standardised on one payment method that will work across all operators. Frankly Iím not having 17 apps on my phone, 17 rfid cards in the car or a balance of funds lodged with 17 bloominí different operators thank you very much. A real weakness at the moment.

  46. #46
    Master Pitch3110's Avatar
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    I think the majority of newly installed and simple contactless now or certainly the one I have used. In reality Tesla solution is just so simple but every manufacturer doing the same is just nonsense.

    I guess more of the older EV chargers will be converted as the current app based approach is archaic.

    Pitch

  47. #47
    Why is an app even needed, why canít electricity used be paid for as we do for petrol?

  48. #48
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Why is an app even needed, why canít electricity used be paid for as we do for petrol?
    They were trying different pricing models to tie you into a particular network of chargers, for example monthly or annual subscription to then give lower per KW charge costs. Whilst I have signed up for multiple apps and cards, in reality I have only actually used contactless.


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  49. #49
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by stuie-t View Post
    I was pleasantly surprised about the general availability of rapid chargers (50kw+) on a recent weekend break we had in Norfolk, including this place where they had 8 125kw chargers and I was the only one using any of them!




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Ah, Necton! I know it well. Brilliant facility for EV drivers, Instavolt have changed the landscape for us, and theyíre still expanding. Easy to use/pay, and reliable as well.

  50. #50
    I only ever charge at work or Tesco, are you saying most charge points are contactless bank card now? Thatís good news.

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