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Thread: Where to buy an NH36?

  1. #1
    Journeyman Idontgram's Avatar
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    Where to buy an NH36?

    Any recommendations? Lots on eBay at variable prices but I suspect some may be knock-offs...


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  2. #2
    Grand Master
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    Cousins.

  3. #3
    Journeyman Idontgram's Avatar
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    Hmmm, I guess that should have been pretty obvious. Thank you for politely overlooking my silliness!


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  4. #4
    Craftsman
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    When buying NH35/36 there are two prices for calibrated and non-calibrated.

    Anyone know how to calibrate an uncalibrated one if I wanted to try ?


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  5. #5
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe narvey View Post

    Anyone know how to calibrate an uncalibrated one if I wanted to try ?


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    Thereís a world if difference between regulation and adjustment in watch terms, to improve the performance of a movement by adjustment requires a high degree of skill.

    Donít expect miracles from these movements, theyíre venerable workhorses that benefit from being stripped down, cleaned, and lubricated carefully. A little work to ensure the hairspring is true and running properly will usually pay off but it isnít worth spending lots of time and effort repoising the balance etc, tgat would be like trying to polish a turd.

    Most cheap Seikos are out of beat to some degree and poorly regulated, this is easy to correct, but anything more isnít worth the effort in my opinion.

  6. #6
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    Where to buy an NH36?

    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Thereís a world if difference between regulation and adjustment in watch terms, to improve the performance of a movement by adjustment requires a high degree of skill.

    Donít expect miracles from these movements, theyíre venerable workhorses that benefit from being stripped down, cleaned, and lubricated carefully. A little work to ensure the hairspring is true and running properly will usually pay off but it isnít worth spending lots of time and effort repoising the balance etc, tgat would be like trying to polish a turd.

    Most cheap Seikos are out of beat to some degree and poorly regulated, this is easy to correct, but anything more isnít worth the effort in my opinion.
    Thank you, very helpful. Iíím dismantling one and keen to play and learn. This one will no doubt become spares once I dismantle it and forget how I did it.

    When oiling, are there specific points you would always lubricate or do specific mechanisms have specific must-do lubrication points.

    I saw a youtube video on these where the person doing the service opened the barrel , cleaned and lubricated the spring. Is this standard practice for a service ?

    Thanks in advance.


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    Last edited by joe narvey; 12th September 2020 at 09:31.

  7. #7
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    Do yourself a huge favour and buy the Donald de Carle book 'Practical Watch Repairing'. It might seem a bit outdated because it was written many years ago, but the fundamentals haven`t changed.

    It'll answer many of your questions.

    Oils and lubricants are expensive, you need to spend around £200 to get what you need, but once purchased they'll last till the expiry date. As an example, you really need to epilame treat the pallet stones, escape wheel teeth and balance jewel endstones, this will prevent the lubricant migrating away. Epilame solution is around £90/bottle, so that's almost half of your £200 budget. Moebius HP1300, HP500, 9010 and 941/2 will cover virtually all oiling requirements, 9501 grease, kluber 125 for barrel walls and 8300 general grease are the ones I use. Unfortunately there's no cheap alternatives if you're doing it properly. An ultrasonic bath, a few small screw-top jars , a gallon of L&R no 3 rinse and a gallon of L & R Extra Fine ultrasonic watch cleaning solution will cover the cleaning requirements. A arts drier can be made using a desk lamp fitted with a halogen or tungsten filament bulb that kicks outsome heat.

    Others may disagree, but in my view there's no 'toe in the water' alternative, getting set up to work on watches costs money.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Do yourself a huge favour and buy the Donald de Carle book 'Practical Watch Repairing'. It might seem a bit outdated because it was written many years ago, but the fundamentals haven`t changed.

    It'll answer many of your questions.

    Oils and lubricants are expensive, you need to spend around £200 to get what you need, but once purchased they'll last till the expiry date. As an example, you really need to epilame treat the pallet stones, escape wheel teeth and balance jewel endstones, this will prevent the lubricant migrating away. Epilame solution is around £90/bottle, so that's almost half of your £200 budget. Moebius HP1300, HP500, 9010 and 941/2 will cover virtually all oiling requirements, 9501 grease, kluber 125 for barrel walls and 8300 general grease are the ones I use. Unfortunately there's no cheap alternatives if you're doing it properly. An ultrasonic bath, a few small screw-top jars , a gallon of L&R no 3 rinse and a gallon of L & R Extra Fine ultrasonic watch cleaning solution will cover the cleaning requirements. A arts drier can be made using a desk lamp fitted with a halogen or tungsten filament bulb that kicks outsome heat.

    Others may disagree, but in my view there's no 'toe in the water' alternative, getting set up to work on watches costs money.
    Thatís really helpful, thank you. I have an ultrasonic bath and basket from servicing dive equipment so now I need to google the other bits and see what to order. Thank you.


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