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Thread: Kayaking

  1. #1

    Kayaking

    Looking at getting a family kayak with 3 seats. Never done it before but with this weather and living close to a river I reckon it could be great fun.
    Anybody here do this and have any tips of what to look for? I see there are sit on and sit in kayaks. I would of thought sit in ones are more stable. Would be chucking it on the camper and taking to the sea once in a while also.

  2. #2
    Craftsman Kris's Avatar
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    I've done bit (I'm a British Canoeing Coach and Instructor)

    First thing I'd say is you may struggle finding a family Kayak with 3 seats. Most have a maximum of 2, though with some (I'm thinking of a Perception Kiwi) a 3rd smaller person could fit in the middle.n You might want to think about getting 1 double kayak and a single kayak instead ?

    Sit on tops are a good idea for a total beginner as people don't feel worried about being trapped in them if they capsize, the downside is they have very little back support and general (connectivity) which means they aren't as comfortable for longer journeys or sessions and make carrying things (picnic lunches, spare clothes, sunscreen etc) harder. They are just as stable as enclosed Kayaks and some can with the right training and skills even be used on grade 2 /3 whitewater.

    Sit in Kayaks are generally a bit more comfortable and better for longer journeys as there is more space to stow things and will keep you a bit dryer if it rains, or warmer if it gets windy or chilly.

    If it is just flat river and lake paddling, then you may find an open canoe (think Native american Indian) more suitable as they can easily carry 3 adults or two adults and 2 small kids. They would be a little bit "interesting" trying to get through waves to and from the beach though.

    Don't forget safety equipment as everyone needs their own correctly fitting buoyancy aid (can be had for as little as £15 from Decathlon)
    https://www.decathlon.co.uk/C-50789-buoyancy-aids or more specialized BA's can cost a lot more :-)

    Normally i'd suggest finding a local kayaking club and going down for a try out session and to learn some skills ( actually I do recommend this), but appreciate that at the moment that might not be possible due to COVID-19 and wanting to get on the water now , so take it easy and be careful.

    YouTube is a good place to learn some basic strokes to go forwards, back and turn, certainly enough to get you on the water and paddling around.

    Alternatively, have you thought about paddle boarding ? It's great fun and kids find it a lot easier to do than adults (better sense of balance and less weight - little sods ;-) ) They can be used on rivers and in the sea and you can even get paddle boards that hold 8 people !

    Feel free to ask any more questions

  3. #3

    Kayaking

    I can share what I have.

    Iím an archetypical, all the gear and no idea.

    We have a Swedish Linder aluminium, open, Canadian style canoe, the Airstream of canoes, two beautiful wooden paddles and a VW California camper van. Had the canoe quite a few years. We went for aluminium as we have to keep it in the garden. We did have a plywood canoe that we made on a long weekend activity holiday, great fun, but it rotted after a 2 or 3 years as we had to keep it outside.

    Partner is very confident with water, me less so. My most precious possession is my life jacket. We paddle the rivers and canals of England. You wouldnít catch me in the sea in it and never again am I going down a canoe chute to avoid portage at a weir.

    Otherwise, itís great fun. We load up with a picnic, my little Trangia alcohol stove to make tea, spend a couple of hours paddling out and arguing about whoís paddling wrong, calm down over tea and two hours arguing back to the van. The truth is it can be quite hard work but relaxing. I avoid the Thames when moving fast.

    The view from the river is brilliant, Iíve never seen so many kingfishers in my life. Crossing the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct was fun.

    Ps. Based on what Kris said, it can be hard on the back. We have back rests that we attach to the canoe seats and they help a lot.

    Our canoe is similar to this one we hired in Sweden. Can take three seats and a fair amount of gear.




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    Last edited by BillyCasper; 24th May 2020 at 07:53.

  4. #4
    Master amnesia's Avatar
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    I've done a bit too... can't stress that the most important things to buy are a BA or PFD (personal floatation device) and a helmet, even if you're going nowhere near white water. Helmets are compulsory at my local lake as it's shallow and rocky and we have up to 30 boats in the water of an evening.

    If you get a kayak the first thing to do is get used to capsizing... if you don't know what to expect you will always be wary of going in which will prevent you from enjoying it. Get used to what happens when you turn upside down, how long it takes to get out, and the shock of being disoriented and you won't panic when it happens. Learning how to empty water and get back in when you're out of your depth is a skill that comes later ;)

    It's a great way to keep fit, and immense fun !

  5. #5
    Craftsman canuck's Avatar
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    Kayaking

    For three... find an ocean kayak Malibu two xl... itís the big red one.

    Sit on tops are easy to use and excellent for learning... also helps that you caníít sink them!

    Last edited by canuck; 21st May 2020 at 16:00.

  6. #6
    @ Kris. Thanks some great info. Funnily enough was just out for a walk and seen someone getting out the river in a open canoe. In fact it was this one https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...15-5-canoe.htm Great looking thing and looked very stable but as you say i imagine not great for the sea.
    These are some ive been looking at
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SIT-ON-TO...E/264695665325
    https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...mini-sport.htm

    Like the look of this but out of budget

    https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...on-prodigy.htm

    https://www.decathlon.co.uk/tobago-r...d_8387867.html

    @ billycasper. Had to have a look on youtube for (canoe shoot to avoid portage at a weir). Looks great fun but i would also be pooping it. The arguing is something that is bound to be replicated with us

    @ amnesia. The capsizing sounds a very good idea to get used to it. Might not tell the Mrs though, will be a nice surprise!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprite1275 View Post
    @ Kris. Thanks some great info. Funnily enough was just out for a walk and seen someone getting out the river in a open canoe. In fact it was this one https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...15-5-canoe.htm Great looking thing and looked very stable but as you say i imagine not great for the sea.
    These are some ive been looking at
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SIT-ON-TO...E/264695665325
    https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...mini-sport.htm

    Like the look of this but out of budget

    https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...on-prodigy.htm

    https://www.decathlon.co.uk/tobago-r...d_8387867.html

    @ billycasper. Had to have a look on youtube for (canoe shoot to avoid portage at a weir). Looks great fun but i would also be pooping it. The arguing is something that is bound to be replicated with us

    @ amnesia. The capsizing sounds a very good idea to get used to it. Might not tell the Mrs though, will be a nice surprise!
    The Canadian canoes look stable as you say, but they are very easy to capsize ! I used to go canoeing as a kid and the instructors would tip you in on purpose so you got used to it

  8. #8
    Kris is the guy to listen to here. Be safe first and the fun will be great.
    I have a couple of SoT's. Currently sitting in my barn in France and really looking forward to getting out on them again when travel resumes. One thing you will need is a decent roof rack an J Bars. I have a LWB Transit and these don't fit inside.


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  9. #9
    They look great Ray, I’ve also been looking @ a tandem Kayak, Perception Gemini. Had a go in one in France couple of years ago, couple who owned it said it’s a great all rounder? They don’t make them anymore and are made by a different company now I believe and are not the same?

    Tried to buy one off eBay a couple of times, but hold there value very well it seems..

    Any other suggestions for a couple of novices for other kayaks to purchase? Being on top of the river makes sense for us.
    Last edited by Snoodles; 21st May 2020 at 09:39.

  10. #10
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snoodles View Post
    Any other suggestions for a couple of novices? Being on top of the river makes sense for us.
    If you have no recovery (= plan to come back to where you started from), paddle upstream first.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    If you have no recovery (= plan to come back to where you started from), paddle upstream first.
    How thought provoking!

  12. #12
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    It was said in jest, but truly you always underestimate the current. Of course, ideally you drive a recovery vehicle down to your destination first, come back cycling as usually distances are reasonable, even over 2 days.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snoodles View Post
    They look great Ray, Iíve also been looking @ a tandem Kayak, Perception Gemini. Had a go in one in France couple of years ago, couple who owned it said itís a great all rounder? They donít make them anymore and are made by a different company now I believe and are not the same?

    Tried to buy one off eBay a couple of times, but hold there value very well it seems..

    Any other suggestions for a couple of novices of other kayaks to purchase? Being on top of the river makes sense for us.
    As an ex white water Kayaker I would suggest a sit on top is a safer option. However your last comment about rivers makes me uneasy. Many French rivers are very wide and undulating, given the more stable weather a trip down the Dordogne is very pleasant. However UK rivers are different, they are narrower, faster flowing and can be tricky at times. A sit up on could become a real handful on a river if conditions change.

    If you fancy sea, canal paddling then SOT. If you are looking at enjoying your local rivers please do review Kris post 2 and get some training. Done well its a fantastic sport and both my son and I travelled all over the country paddling safely.

    Steve

  14. #14
    Very interested in this thread, late last year we moved closer to the south coast and since then my missus has been nagging me to invest in a couple of SoT kayaks. Every year we fly out to Anna Maria Island in Florida and part of our daily exercise is an hour or two paddle along the inlets and out to the bay. I guess paddling in the English Channel is a bit different ti Tampa Bay.
    Thereís a canoeing and kayaking club just up the road from us and I may well give them a call.

    We were booked to go away this week and right now we should be doing this...




  15. #15
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    I the SE coast and have a couple of Ocean kayaks (sit on)
    Love them been doing it for about 8 years and like to get out as often as I can- I personally think sit ons are great
    Easily maneuverable. maybe its just me but like to be on my kayak alone (not a 2 man)
    You wont look back nothing better than getting out on the water
    Untitled by biglewie, on Flickr
    Last edited by lewie; 21st May 2020 at 13:25.

  16. #16
    Craftsman Kris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprite1275 View Post
    @ Kris. Thanks some great info. Funnily enough was just out for a walk and seen someone getting out the river in a open canoe. In fact it was this one https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...15-5-canoe.htm Great looking thing and looked very stable but as you say i imagine not great for the sea.
    These are some ive been looking at
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SIT-ON-TO...E/264695665325
    https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...mini-sport.htm

    Like the look of this but out of budget

    https://www.kayaksandpaddles.co.uk/c...on-prodigy.htm

    https://www.decathlon.co.uk/tobago-r...d_8387867.html
    Personally, of the boats you've listed try and find the extra budget to go for the Perception Prodigy as it seems a good all rounder, or as an alternative the Feel Free Gemini. I've paddled both Perception and Feel free boats before and they are good quality at their price range.

    In terms of capsizing, it is something that will happen at some point, so best practiced in advance ( so it isn't a nice surprise for your good lady), especially with children who might panic slightly or be shocked by the surprise leading to confusion and distress for all concerned. Practicing and experiencing it in a "controlled" environment helps build confidence and takes away the fear of the unknown very early on.

    As a novice paddler i'd definitely say get out and walk the boat around any river features you come across such as locks, weirs and rapids until you are more confident and have had some training.

  17. #17
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    I too am an instructor. Kayaking has always been a massive part of my life, I couldn't do without it. It is an amazingly varied sport.

    I'll echo everything Chris says and add a little.

    For a family activity a canoe will be better than a kayak. I've seen a three seater SOT, but the middle seat was really only for a small child and don't expect them to be able to participate in the paddling from there.
    A two seater SOT and a single may be a good compromise. Or SUPs.

    I'd recommend that everyone new does at least three or four sessions with a club. You need to be shown how to exit the boat upside down and self rescue. Be that re-entering or swimming to the shore with your kit.
    Obvioulsy that isn't going to happen right now, so if you get a boat, stay within swimming range of the shore. That means in range of the weakest swimmer.

    In open water you should also be aware of the effect of the wind. A boat will blow away from you far faster than you can swim after it, so if you're on your own, don't let go!

    Oh, wear suncream. Loads of suncream. The water is like a mirror, you seem to get a double dose of sun. :)

  18. #18
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    If you are rich, you could consider a folding kayak, if slightly less rich there are some surprisingly competent inflatable ones out there - with three people in it, it's unlikely that you will be doing anything too exciting. Inflatables are fart more forgiving as they simply will not sink or become waterlogged and that makes wet entry much easier...

  19. #19
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M4tt View Post
    If you are rich, you could consider a folding kayak, if slightly less rich there are some surprisingly competent inflatable ones out there - with three people in it, it's unlikely that you will be doing anything too exciting. Inflatables are fart more forgiving as they simply will not sink or become waterlogged and that makes wet entry much easier...
    *cough* Klepper *cough*

    Of course, initial budget looks like it stood in front of a stampede... And it's not even that family friendly. But what a ride!
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  20. #20
    Master thegoat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M4tt View Post
    If you are rich, you could consider a folding kayak, if slightly less rich there are some surprisingly competent inflatable ones out there - with three people in it, it's unlikely that you will be doing anything too exciting. Inflatables are fart more forgiving as they simply will not sink or become waterlogged and that makes wet entry much easier...
    Iíd agree with the inflatable route too .
    I used to have a Sevylor sit on top which I used in the Irish Sea .They do some 2/3 man open canoes which should be fine .
    I now have an Advanced Elements kayak which is another step up and it has been excellent .
    Obviously wonít track as well as a hard shell but is far more practical .
    Inflating/deflating takes minutes with the hand pump .

  21. #21
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    We are lucky where we live as we have the option of the Sea (Creeks) and a couple of inland rivers.

    I have been kayaking for years, but recently my wife got into it and our kids do it sometimes too (15 and 12).
    I have a single sit in kayak for myself, but the family progression is quite interesting as you end up with the boat you probably avoided in the first place.

    We originally had an inflatable, but you get blown around in any kind breeze. They are hard work if you actually want to get somewhere. Additionally, it becomes hassle to keep pumping it up.

    My wife was worried about sitting inside a kayak, so we got her a sit on one. These dont track at all, so if you stop paddling, you spin round in circles.
    When she was paddling next to me and I had my skeg down, I would stop for a break and my boat just continues in a straight line. It didn't take her long to realise she did actually wanted a sit in kayak with a skeg.

    So the sit on was a waste of money, we had to trade it in at the local shop after only a couple of uses and lost money on it obviously.

    We did also have a family canadian too, but it was big and heavy and not much fun on weirs! Everyone in their own boats really does make it more enjoyable.

    I really would recommend trying a few at a local club. A shop local to me does demo days too, maybe one near you does?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    *cough* Klepper *cough*

    Of course, initial budget looks like it stood in front of a stampede... And it's not even that family friendly. But what a ride!
    Mind your cruel tongue:



    She's listening. I love my Klepper - although I confess that I often use a really crappy inflatable simply because you can be in and out in minutes.

  23. #23
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    They're good, aren't they?

    A bit of a faff to set up though, although I am reliably informed it gets better, it's still a faff.

    Inflatables? Advanced Elements as per thereat are really good, but not cheap either.
    Last edited by Saint-Just; 21st May 2020 at 18:46.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  24. #24
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    my lad getting into the water

    Heres a nice shot of my lad just getting into a river , using a 30' waterfall !

    I should add for anyone who ww Kayaks the drop pushed his footrests right down and trapped his foot , and he still rolled up.

  25. #25
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    When you capsize

    Much has been said about when you capsize, this photo of my pal earned me through a competition, a two day coaching course on the trywern river in north wales. They even blew it up to 4' X 3 . Nice shot
    Last edited by higham5; 21st May 2020 at 19:54.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    They're good, aren't they?

    A bit of a faff to set up though, although I am reliably informed it gets better, it's still a faff.

    Inflatables? Advanced Elements as per thereat are really good, but not cheap either.

    It gets better for a while, but it never stops being a faff and if you don't do it for a while it becomes a real faff again. On a good day fifteen minutes is a realistic target. Mind you, once you are on the water, it is light enough that you can properly surf even on Channel surf. If you are wearing a skirt it can be rolled but it's a bitch to do.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Much has been said about when you capsize, this photo of my pal earned me through a competition, a two day coaching course on the trywern river in north wales. They even blew it up to 4' X 3 . Nice shot
    That's pretty damned cool - if I ever did that, I'd be dead.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Heres a nice shot of my lad just getting into a river , using a 30' waterfall !

    I should add for anyone who ww Kayaks the drop pushed his footrests right down and trapped his foot , and he still rolled up.
    The adjustable foot rests that your foot can slide past are not suitable for that type of water for that very reason. He needs a boat with a full plate footrest for a drop of that size. May I respectfully suggest offering to get him a properly outfitted creek boat? You should be able to pick one up for £500 ish second hand, his safety is worth far more than that. Imagine what could have happened if his roll failed (it happens to us all). Try the UKRiversGuidebook forum.

    What river / drop is it?

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeveal View Post
    The adjustable foot rests that your foot can slide past are not suitable for that type of water for that very reason. He needs a boat with a full plate footrest for a drop of that size. May I respectfully suggest offering to get him a properly outfitted creek boat? You should be able to pick one up for £500 ish second hand, his safety is worth far more than that. Imagine what could have happened if his roll failed (it happens to us all). Try the UKRiversGuidebook forum.

    What river / drop is it?
    Hi Mike the photo is probably 10 years old now and he is a fully qualified skipper on bigger boats so no kayaking now!
    You are right at the time the Pyrana Everest had just come out and lots of lads were moving onto those who regularly paddled in grade 3/4 level rivers.

    We never ventured into creek boats as a bit like downhill mountain biking they just encourage you to run bigger rivers and have bigger offs / pins / swims.

    The boat he is in is a Perception 212 eg super low volume, however he could throw it around like a pro. You are exactly right about the foot rests they were only 2Ē pegs in an aluminium ladder rack. He did have a very robust airbag behind them

    The river is the tees the drop is low force. We had lots of safety on both above and below the falls, still exiting though and this photograph won me a copy of Photoshop courtesy of Camera Monthly.

  29. #29
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    Use a sit on top in West Norfolk, on a flooded gravel pit and the Wash. Had an RTM Ocean Duo and loved it. Might be suitable for you, otherwise they have the Quattro. Not cheap, not light but great fun. Some swine stole it so I have a used Ocean Kayak Malibu 2 - smaller version of the XL mentioned earlier.

    I’m too big for a sit in kayak and can’t be faffed with a dinghy, but a SOT allows me, my son and (happily) my wife to enjoy the water where we holiday.

    Edit: I had a trial run on a hire kayak at Rutland Water - showed me that I wanted a SOT and my son didn’t hate it so all good. As mentioned earlier, a hire session is well worth it.
    Last edited by thenikjones; 22nd May 2020 at 20:30. Reason: Final thought

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Hi Mike the photo is probably 10 years old now and he is a fully qualified skipper on bigger boats so no kayaking now!
    You are right at the time the Pyrana Everest had just come out and lots of lads were moving onto those who regularly paddled in grade 3/4 level rivers.

    We never ventured into creek boats as a bit like downhill mountain biking they just encourage you to run bigger rivers and have bigger offs / pins / swims.

    The boat he is in is a Perception 212 eg super low volume, however he could throw it around like a pro. You are exactly right about the foot rests they were only 2Ē pegs in an aluminium ladder rack. He did have a very robust airbag behind them

    The river is the tees the drop is low force. We had lots of safety on both above and below the falls, still exiting though and this photograph won me a copy of Photoshop courtesy of Camera Monthly.
    I couldn't make out exactly what the boat was. I was thinking Inazone, but at the same time could tell that it wasn't.
    You're right about creekers, they make everything feel at least a grade easier, until you get out for a swim. I used to paddle an Enigma (a plastic squirt boat) because it made stuff much harder. It also made my legs go so completely numb that it took several minutes before I could stand after getting out. And there wasn't room for all the kit I feel obliged to carry these days either.

    I did my 4* in the Enigma. The assessor said the boat was highly inappropriate (to which I agreed) but agreed to pass me if I could do everything required in it, I think he just wanted to see me suffer and didn't think a pass was even possible. I did pass, but what he didn't know was that I was being pushed off the seat by the kit jammed in the rear.

    The Enigma was lethal on WW really, in a breach it would have folded like paper, there was no room for foam stiffeners.

    So now I either paddle a creeker or a playboat, depending on what we're doing, and who with.

    Must head up north and paddle the Tees. Low force looks like a lot of fun. And it is a very good photo.

  31. #31
    Craftsman Kris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeveal View Post
    I couldn't make out exactly what the boat was. I was thinking Inazone, but at the same time could tell that it wasn't.

    Nope, that's definitely an Inazone. I'd guess at it being a 222 as a 212 is a children's size boat(my lad had one but outgrew it by the time he was 10).

    Pyranha badging, the logo on the rear deck and the overall shape gives it away. Good river runners and all rounders but not really designed for Large drops hence the foot pegs rather then full footplate.

    Really good pictures capturing the excitement.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris View Post
    Nope, that's definitely an Inazone. I'd guess at it being a 222 as a 212 is a children's size boat(my lad had one but outgrew it by the time he was 10).

    Pyranha badging, the logo on the rear deck and the overall shape gives it away. Good river runners and all rounders but not really designed for Large drops hence the foot pegs rather then full footplate.

    Really good pictures capturing the excitement.
    Hi both you are both right it was an Inazone 222, I couldnt check it as I skipped it only last year as it had a slow leak and as such wasn't saleable. Where we used to live was quite close to the Washburn. This provided the lad and myself a nice dam release river at a grade of 2/3 to play on. As the releases were certain Sunday’s and Wednesday evenings from May to Sept you were always guaranteed a good turnout.

    I enjoyed the Washburn as you “ knew what you were getting”. I remember running the Kent and it starting to rain, you could feel the river growing under you.

    The Tees barrage was OK , a bit off a trek and to this day we are convinced my lad picked up a nasty bug there , giardia. This caused him to lose a stone and a half , the point being he was only 9 st to start with. I certainly swam in there a lot but my constitution must have protected me.

    Mike when I did my Trywern conversion cause from 2-> 3 star water I had a Liquidlogic Lil Joe kayak. Within an hour the instructor had me out of the boat and let me borrow a Pyranha Burn. He said bluntly I was too heavy for the Lil Joe.

    It was night and day, the boat sat on the water , not in it allowing me to carve and edge. Within a month the lil Joe was gone and I bought a Hoss.

    I would have loved a Burn but because they were so new , there were no ore owned ones around and I didnt fancy stumping up £800

    Lastly Mike you talk about your legs getting numb, I rember at a getout on a river in the north east a paddler came right upto the bank, removed his spray deck and took out what looked like a “ space hopper” . Then we realised he had no legs, total respect to him for taking up paddling.
    Last edited by higham5; 23rd May 2020 at 16:19.

  33. #33
    Journeyman
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    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Hi both you are both right it was an Inazone 222,
    Should have gone with my gut! It did look like an InaZone.
    Here's a Eurokayaks Enigma for comparison. Not mine and not me. They were pretty rare boats even back in the day.


    Kris is right, the InaZone was a cracking boat,one of the best fun cross over boats produced before crossovers were invented. Shame you skipped it, I've resurrected a couple with a hot air soldering iron and a 9mm craft knife.

  34. #34
    Craftsman canuck's Avatar
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    Esquif 15ft prospecteur in yellow. Running the medway River in Nova Scotia. We donít portage.

    https://annapoliscounty.ca/images/st...ay%20River.pdf





  35. #35
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuck View Post
    Esquif 15ft prospecteur in yellow. Running the medway River in Nova Scotia. We donít portage.

    https://annapoliscounty.ca/images/st...ay%20River.pdf




    Looks extraordinarily different from the Medway, Kent that I know...
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  36. #36
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    This is why I love and hate this forum. Here's me just doing the do, and suddenly find I'm sat looking at a surplus speedmaster and thinking about a Linder Inkas.. Fond memories of canadian style canoes on the Dordogne.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Looks extraordinarily different from the Medway, Kent that I know...
    I thought that too 😂

  38. #38
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hafle View Post
    This is why I love and hate this forum. Here's me just doing the do, and suddenly find I'm sat looking at a surplus speedmaster and thinking about a Linder Inkas.. Fond memories of canadian style canoes on the Dordogne.
    And me of white water in spring on the Tarn river... before going to Sťverac and climbing the Parkings
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    And me of white water in spring on the Tarn river... before going to Sťverac and climbing the Parkings
    Don't think my times were quite as exciting. But gave me a love for the (sometimes) lazy nature of Canadian canoes. Busy looking at roof bar options for my car. CV has hammered home the notion that watches are comparatively boring!

  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by hafle View Post
    Don't think my times were quite as exciting. But gave me a love for the (sometimes) lazy nature of Canadian canoes. Busy looking at roof bar options for my car. CV has hammered home the notion that watches are comparatively boring!
    Honestly, looking at the motorbike, kayak and even cooking threads lately, watches are the dullest things going. No wonder my mates think I'm weird! Lol.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by manganr View Post
    Honestly, looking at the motorbike, kayak and even cooking threads lately, watches are the dullest things going. No wonder my mates think I'm weird! Lol.
    Set you alarm clock for 0550 tomorrow, on the new scrambler for 6 , 80 miles , back home for 08:30 , the world is waking up and you can sup a cup of coffee and look at Ducati and smile.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by manganr View Post
    Honestly, looking at the motorbike, kayak and even cooking threads lately, watches are the dullest things going. No wonder my mates think I'm weird! Lol.
    Pizza ovens, canoes, scramblers, yup. Time to think twice.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Looks extraordinarily different from the Medway, Kent that I know...
    Oh the Medway valley has a beauty all of its own from a kayak or even from above:



    The Stour from Ashford to the sea is a constant bundle of surprises.

  44. #44
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    The valley has its merit. But the river is closer to a sewer than a river. Not a Ďdirtyí sewer, but nothing like its transatlantic counterpart.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

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