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Thread: Coffee thread

  1. #51

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by hughtrimble View Post
    For what sort of brewing method?
    Poor answer but I guess a bit of all round. I would have thought most have some sort of control over grain size?

    I'm currently using a standard cafetiere and possibly want to move to drip - I do enjoy a slightly longer brew. I'm also intrigued by Espro's double press - in theory it allows you to grind a little finer and just seems more refined.

    I guess I'd like to give aeropress a go too.

    Quote Originally Posted by junglebert View Post
    Made By Knock, google them

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveya. View Post
    Aerogrind?

    Check out James Hoffmans YouTube feed , hes reviewed entry level and higher end hand grinders

    Sent from my SM-G988B using Tapatalk
    Thank you both - will look into the suggestions, may work out well in combination with buying an aeropress.

  3. #53
    Dealing with MBK themselves can be tricky, customer service isnít their strength, but if you can find a reseller with one, that would be better.

  4. #54
    Master DMC102's Avatar
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    I bought this recently and although it's not infinitesimally adjustable it does pre-infuse and steam quite nicely, and I've been getting very good results with it overall.

    Morning lattes and evening double espressos for me, and I like a robust and aromatic brew. I'd really appreciate some good bean recommendations.

    Illy red is all I've been able to lay my hands on lately, and it's not really floating my boat.

  5. #55
    Please Google a roastery near you, support a local business and get fresh beans you can pick up, build a relationship and get advice, just my 2p

    The Sage is great, if you are making lovely coffee that's all that matters.

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  6. #56
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    Aeropress, any Arabia coffee beans, heaped coffee spoon(7g+), water off the boil topped up to mark 2., inverted method, stirred with a wooden chopstick, left for about 3 to 5 mins, press into my bodum carrier or mug, top up with water so as not to over extract. Drink it black. Been doing this for 2 years. Part of the morning routine. A nice comfortable, familiar cup of coffee every morning.

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyp View Post
    Poor answer but I guess a bit of all round. I would have thought most have some sort of control over grain size?

    I'm currently using a standard cafetiere and possibly want to move to drip - I do enjoy a slightly longer brew. I'm also intrigued by Espro's double press - in theory it allows you to grind a little finer and just seems more refined.

    I guess I'd like to give aeropress a go too.
    Whilst some in that price range can get fine enough for espresso, it doesn't mean you can then adjust precisely enough to actually tailor your extraction appropriately - the ability to make tiny adjustments to the grind size tends to come with a higher price tag due to the more precise tolerances needed. Being able to dial in the grind that precisely doesn't matter so much for other extraction methods, but for espresso it is really quite important.

    I'd suggest either investing more now than your ideal £50-70 to get a hand grinder capable of almost all brew methods (1zpresso's JX Pro for example - £190) or don't worry about espresso and go for a grinder that's suitable for other brew methods only which will get you into your lower range. As already mentioned, if you can get to the £100 mark the Aergrind by Made by Knock are highly regarded. It will certainly work for espresso, but it may not be able to dial in the grind quite so precisely (to some people being able to only change the grind size and that result in the amount of time changing by just a couple of seconds to produce a pre-defined amount of espresso, is key).

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyp View Post
    Poor answer but I guess a bit of all round. I would have thought most have some sort of control over grain size?

    I'm currently using a standard cafetiere and possibly want to move to drip - I do enjoy a slightly longer brew. I'm also intrigued by Espro's double press - in theory it allows you to grind a little finer and just seems more refined.

    I guess I'd like to give aeropress a go too.






    Thank you both - will look into the suggestions, may work out well in combination with buying an aeropress.
    If youíre interested in drip, spend 6 quid on a V60, and a few quid on some papers. Thatís all you need.

  9. #59
    Oh, and Iíd avoid the 1zpresso stuff, or whatever itís called, Chinese made, and no support. Not bad kit, but if (when) it breaks, youíre on your own.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by junglebert View Post
    Oh, and I’d avoid the 1zpresso stuff, or whatever it’s called, Chinese made, and no support. Not bad kit, but if (when) it breaks, you’re on your own.
    That's not good to hear - correct on Chinese made, but the quality is excellent. Did you buy through the UK distributor and they failed to support you?

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by hughtrimble View Post
    Whilst some in that price range can get fine enough for espresso, it doesn't mean you can then adjust precisely enough to actually tailor your extraction appropriately - the ability to make tiny adjustments to the grind size tends to come with a higher price tag due to the more precise tolerances needed. Being able to dial in the grind that precisely doesn't matter so much for other extraction methods, but for espresso it is really quite important.

    I'd suggest either investing more now than your ideal £50-70 to get a hand grinder capable of almost all brew methods (1zpresso's JX Pro for example - £190) or don't worry about espresso and go for a grinder that's suitable for other brew methods only which will get you into your lower range. As already mentioned, if you can get to the £100 mark the Aergrind by Made by Knock are highly regarded. It will certainly work for espresso, but it may not be able to dial in the grind quite so precisely (to some people being able to only change the grind size and that result in the amount of time changing by just a couple of seconds to produce a pre-defined amount of espresso, is key).
    Thanks. I think the espresso requirement can be more lenient on. I cannot see me getting a proper machine and maybe an occasional moka pot use only (along with aeropress)

    On the V60 suggestion above - thanks that was the way I was thinking!

    The grinder reminds me of a tripod if I use the photographer analogy. Costs more than some key equipment but youíre rewarded with a good one!


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  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    I bought this recently and although it's not infinitesimally adjustable it does pre-infuse and steam quite nicely, and I've been getting very good results with it overall.

    Morning lattes and evening double espressos for me, and I like a robust and aromatic brew. I'd really appreciate some good bean recommendations.

    Illy red is all I've been able to lay my hands on lately, and it's not really floating my boat.
    If you canít find a good supplier locally as has been suggested then you could give Rave Coffee a try for mail order. I find that their signature blend works really well in my Sage machine, not massively robust but very smooth and a good depth of flavour. Freshly roasted beans make a world of difference.

  13. #63
    Craftsman smalleyboy1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveya. View Post
    Gaggia Classic

    PID
    SSR for steamer
    Upgraded screen
    Upgraded gasket
    Upgraded drip tray
    Upgraded baskets
    Upgraded steamer
    Upgraded portafilter
    Upgraded tamp and leveller
    Funnel
    Scales
    Upgrade for grinder for one notch
    Opv mod

    I'm in deep

    Sent from my SM-G988B using Tapatalk
    But do you still not have to wait for the boiler to get up to temp to steam your milk after you have pulled your shot? I have the standard 2019 Gaggia Classic and I wish I could steam milk at the same time.

  14. #64
    Craftsman smalleyboy1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDunc View Post
    Currently living overseas (ex Devon) and went for ECM after trawling through a multitude of reviews on you tube etc. Certainly better value than a DB and should provide me with the coffee experience I want. Previous machine was a Breville (I think sold under Sage brand in UK) with grinder built in on top of the machine. Made great coffee and at around 350GBP was great value. The downside was the inability to extract and steam at the same time....otherwise I had no complaints.
    The new machine is set up and ready but was too late to be drinking coffee this evening so I will pull my first shot in the morning.....20 min warm up needed (Breville 15 secs)!!!
    Thanks for the update. I switch on my Gaggia in the morning as Iím preparing my breakfast and it is ready within the 10-15 minutes I take to eat.

    Nice place Devon, I have a connection with Paignton.

  15. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyp View Post
    Thanks. I think the espresso requirement can be more lenient on. I cannot see me getting a proper machine and maybe an occasional moka pot use only (along with aeropress)

    On the V60 suggestion above - thanks that was the way I was thinking!

    The grinder reminds me of a tripod if I use the photographer analogy. Costs more than some key equipment but you’re rewarded with a good one!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I use a V60 too, for lighter roasts and when I want to make more coffee. It's a lovely method.

    Edited to add that if I could start over again with this coffee thing, I'd go for a very low retention, single dose grinder like the Niche Zero for its ability to change rapidly between grinding very fine for espresso and much coarser for pour over, its really decent grind consistency at the price point and its size. It is £500 though and electric. I really, really like the ability to take a hand grinder with me and not have to rely on the longevity of electronics and having a power supply, which is why I've not sold up my two grinders for the Niche.
    Last edited by hughtrimble; 24th April 2020 at 22:52.

  16. #66
    Master ed335d's Avatar
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    I recently Ďupgradedí from a Francis Francis X1 which Iíd had for many years any just used pre-ground Illy red.

    Deciding I wanted a bit more engagement, I decided to go with a lever press and got a La Pavoni Europiccola and an Iberital MC2 grinder (which I subsequently discovered made accurate dosing very hard, so always ended up grinding too much).

    Iíve since also purchase a Rok grinder which seems to do a pretty good job.

    Itís been a steep learning curve to say the least, with a good month or so of truly terrible shots. Iíve found a good local roaster and am now trying their various beans.

    I still have a way to go to with consistency, but Iíve discovered that a lever press is not the easiest contraption to master (but it is lovely to look at!).


  17. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by smalleyboy1 View Post
    But do you still not have to wait for the boiler to get up to temp to steam your milk after you have pulled your shot? I have the standard 2019 Gaggia Classic and I wish I could steam milk at the same time.
    Takes about 30 seconds tbh, ive got a pid set to 139 and I'm only creaming a small amount of milk , i don't drink lattes

    Just make sure you have a warmed double wall glass

    Yes a twin boiler machine is nice but not a big deal for me as I drink straight espresso mid week

    Re Devon, I live here, Devon coffee rocks

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  18. #68
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    I've got an Aergrind which works well. Before that I use a Porlex ceramic burr coffee grinder which I imported from Japan via Amazon. That was decent for the price at the time too.

  19. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by ed335d View Post
    I recently Ďupgradedí from a Francis Francis X1 which Iíd had for many years any just used pre-ground Illy red.

    Deciding I wanted a bit more engagement, I decided to go with a lever press and got a La Pavoni Europiccola and an Iberital MC2 grinder (which I subsequently discovered made accurate dosing very hard, so always ended up grinding too much).

    Iíve since also purchase a Rok grinder which seems to do a pretty good job.

    Itís been a steep learning curve to say the least, with a good month or so of truly terrible shots. Iíve found a good local roaster and am now trying their various beans.

    I still have a way to go to with consistency, but Iíve discovered that a lever press is not the easiest contraption to master (but it is lovely to look at!).

    I had a Europiccola for about 10 years but chopped it for a Rancilio Silvia about 3 years ago.

    I found the La Pavoni was too inconsistent for me:

    25% of shots were heavenly

    25% of shots resembled dirty dish water

    The rest were somewhere in between!

    You can end up down a rabbit hole with these machines with PIDs, grinding off the spouts on the portafilters, becoming obsessional about your own tamping pressure etc.

    They do look great though!

  20. #70
    Its an epic rabbit hole that itches and itch, to piss about on something pointless for self gratification

    Decent DC1 and Niche plus G Shock or a second hand Rolex? Hmmm

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  21. #71
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    I am using the Expresso Beans Fairtrade Strong Sainsbury’s own. Come’s in 1kg bags,when opened keep in the fridge. Grind as I want it perfect proper coffee every time.

  22. #72
    If you are loving the coffee that's a that matters. At some point you may either have a coffee somewhere else you think is even nicer and what to replicate it, or you get the affliction to play a bit for fun, after all some of use enjoy the process as much as the coffee

    Be warned though, as pointed out earlier the rabbit hole is regressive, for every 10ft you dig down to get about a 1cm of extra pleasure

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  23. #73
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
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    No machine here is going to come close to replicating four years in Colombia with the freshest of beans arriving from the Triangle daily and the satisfaction of paying 50p on a street corner for a small slice of heaven

    These days I get the most pleasure from the Bosnian děezva but there's a modest bean-to-cup DeLonghi for convenience, a selection of a moka pots and the obligatory AeroPress for travel.

    Don't Panic

  24. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Curta View Post
    No machine here is going to come close to replicating four years in Colombia with the freshest of beans arriving from the Triangle daily and the satisfaction of paying 50p on a street corner for a small slice of heaven

    These days I get the most pleasure from the Bosnian děezva but there's a modest bean-to-cup DeLonghi for convenience, a selection of a moka pots and the obligatory AeroPress for travel.
    Do you grind your own beans and what do you use? I imagine you have to pulverise to a dust for the děezva?

  25. #75
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyp View Post
    Do you grind your own beans and what do you use? I imagine you have to pulverise to a dust for the džezva?



    Well, not really, but it looks similar.
    Don't Panic

  26. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Curta View Post


    Well, not really, but it looks similar.
    haha!

  27. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Curta View Post
    No machine here is going to come close to replicating four years in Colombia with the freshest of beans arriving from the Triangle daily and the satisfaction of paying 50p on a street corner for a small slice of heaven

    These days I get the most pleasure from the Bosnian děezva but there's a modest bean-to-cup DeLonghi for convenience, a selection of a moka pots and the obligatory AeroPress for travel.

    Is that Bosnian different to Turkish coffee?

  28. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Is that Bosnian different to Turkish coffee?
    Have a read of this article.....http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2014...bosnian-coffee

  29. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by junglebert View Post
    Get yourself a WiFi plug, then you can set it to come on and warm up while youíre still snoozing

    - - - Updated - - -



    Get yourself a WiFi plug, then you can set it to come on and warm up while youíre still snoozing
    That is the plan!! Problem with Lockdown is we cannot get anything but ESSENTIAL items - thankfully, we drop to Level 3 at 2359hrs on monday so the plug will be available to order on tuesday morning.

  30. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    I bought this recently and although it's not infinitesimally adjustable it does pre-infuse and steam quite nicely, and I've been getting very good results with it overall.

    Morning lattes and evening double espressos for me, and I like a robust and aromatic brew. I'd really appreciate some good bean recommendations.

    Illy red is all I've been able to lay my hands on lately, and it's not really floating my boat.
    Great machine indeed. Breville here in NZ and the coffee is consistently good.
    It went to its new owner yesterday (work colleague). You can still get a terrible extraction if the grind is wrong but easy to play around with. TBH, I still haven't made a coffee of the same quality as my Breville on my new machine!!!! But it's easy to get sucked into coffee as is the culture here and dream of being your own Barista...not as easy as they make it look. I'm waiting to start a training course as I'm longing to drop some normal work and make coffee part time. Would be lots of fun.

  31. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazyp View Post
    I've learned something new. Thanks for sharing.

  32. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by crazyp View Post
    Thanks, so essentially Bosnian, coffee added to boiling water, Turkish coffee there from cold.
    Often have Turkish, Iíll try the other way next time see if it makes much difference. Suspect that other variables might be just as important.

  33. #83
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    Breville fan boy here. Super easy to use which is a plus for a novice like me but the coffee it produces is great. Have just subscribed to union press for regular deliveries which is a nice way to get various beans sent through weekly/fortnightly/monthly

  34. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Thanks, so essentially Bosnian, coffee added to boiling water, Turkish coffee there from cold.
    Often have Turkish, Iíll try the other way next time see if it makes much difference. Suspect that other variables might be just as important.
    Basically. The serving is also slightly different as the article says. Not sure how much of a difference that makes.


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  35. #85
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Thanks, so essentially Bosnian, coffee added to boiling water, Turkish coffee there from cold.
    Often have Turkish, I’ll try the other way next time see if it makes much difference. Suspect that other variables might be just as important.
    That's a good article (thanks crazyp) that describes the distinctive differences and the experience rather well. You certainly tend to end up with fewer grounds in the cup and a thick foam - I've learned the hard way to keep a close eye on the džezva as it can get very messy if it boils over. But much of the enjoyment comes from evoking a time and a place - Bosnians are easy-going, hospitable and witty; Sarajevo and Mostar are amongst my favourite cities anywhere. Starting the day with my best friend by lingering over a brew on the veranda of his little house on Čiovo always comes to mind. Simple pleasures.
    Don't Panic

  36. #86
    While on this (sub-)topic, anyone any idea whether this is for coffee? Unusually it has a lid so maybe for something else (water/milk?). Watch shown for scale!


  37. #87
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    Just finish this off. Very nice. Still debating whether to invest in an espresso machine or not.

  38. #88
    I prefer the flavour rather than the strength of coffee and so go for filter / pour over techniques.



    I started with the Chemex 6 cup traditional glass container with the wooden handles (which by the way makes a damn fine wine decanter - great pour control) but have moved over to the Hario V60, using the Hario goose necked kettle, and Hario scales. This ties in really nicely with my local roasters in Edinburgh, Artisan Roast, who generally don't produce dark, or heavy roasted beans. I follow the James Hoffman methodology to produce a nice two cup jug of coffee most mornings - 30gms of coffee ground in my Eureka Mignon Mk2 stepless grinder.

    100 deg C Water for light roast, can go slightly colder with dark roasts.
    60g/L ratio (16.67:1 ratio. Can be up to taste)
    Grind Size: Slightly finer than medium (though ultimately up to taste)



    1. Rinse paper in V60 and pre heat it
    2. Pour in coffee, make a well with your finger in the coffee bed
    3. Start timer and gently pour 2x coffee dose as water to bloom (up to 3x coffee dose if necessary)
    4. SWIRL IT GOOD
    5. Wait 30 to 45 seconds
    6. Spiral pour in 60% of total brew water in until 1:15 (i.e 60% of 500g, pour to 300g)
    7. Keep it topped up, slowly pouring the rest of the brew water over 30 seconds. (i.e. 100% of brew water by 1:45)
    8. Little stir in one direction, then a little stir in the opposite direction. (About 1 to 1.5 revolutions each way)
    9. Once it has drained a bit, then SWIRL IT
    10. Wait for the coffee to fully drain. You want a flat bed of coffee and no big grinds of coffee on the side of the filter paper.
    11. Enjoy!


    At this time, many coffee shops are hanging on in there by on-line sales. If you can, support your local coffee shop and roasters! These are on the way! :)


  39. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    While on this (sub-)topic, anyone any idea whether this is for coffee? Unusually it has a lid so maybe for something else (water/milk?). Watch shown for scale!

    Looks like a Turkish/Greek coffee pot

  40. #90
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Middo View Post
    Looks like a Turkish/Greek coffee pot
    The neck doesn't appear to taper enough for that.

    Looks more like a Brandy Pan.
    Don't Panic

  41. #91
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Curta View Post
    The neck doesn't appear to taper enough for that.

    Looks more like a Brandy Pan.
    Thanks, looks exactly like one of these! https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/768999037/

  42. #92
    Grand Master PickleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Curta View Post
    The neck doesn't appear to taper enough for that.

    Looks more like a Brandy Pan.
    What were the Georgians using the warmed brandy for? These pans seem to be quite common as antiques, but I don't see a modern equivalent. Was 'flambť' a culinary fashion or what, please?

  43. #93
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PickleB View Post
    What were the Georgians using the warmed brandy for? These pans seem to be quite common as antiques, but I don't see a modern equivalent. Was 'flambť' a culinary fashion or what, please?
    Dunno, just seen them labelled as brandy pans in antique shops.
    Don't Panic

  44. #94
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    I really fancy a Turkish coffee now.

    Thanks for the BBC post

  45. #95
    Journeyman Kevin's Avatar
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    I am looking to get a grinder and will be doing V60 pour overs.
    I have heard varied comments on Porlex and have been recommended MBK (made By Knock) but they are out of stock.
    Any recommendations? preferably from those grinding for pour overs

  46. #96
    I have a Comandante C40 and its fine for espresso so will be perfect for pour over

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  47. #97
    Journeyman Kevin's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply, looks really good but a bit over my budget, I was looking for something about £125.00 max


    Quote Originally Posted by Daveya. View Post
    I have a Comandante C40 and its fine for espresso so will be perfect for pour over

    Sent from my SM-G988B using Tapatalk

  48. #98
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin View Post
    I am looking to get a grinder and will be doing V60 pour overs.
    I have heard varied comments on Porlex and have been recommended MBK (made By Knock) but they are out of stock.
    Any recommendations? preferably from those grinding for pour overs
    I think the Rhino is a better grinder than the porlex, especially the handle and stud at the end of the shaft.
    Would hold out for Knock though, they are a class above in construction and ease of use.

  49. #99
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    I've got a barattza virtuoso, you could pick up a barattza encore that would be great for filter coffee and in your price range. Got mine from coffee hit (no affiliation) but they are currently sold out.

  50. #100
    Journeyman Kevin's Avatar
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    Thanks, that has given me a few more options.
    Everyone I have looked at has been sold out.
    Looks like everyone is spending lockdown baking and making coffee

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