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Thread: Storing motorbikes in a shed

  1. #1
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Storing motorbikes in a shed

    Some advice please, as i can't find any information on the Internet...

    My son and I both have motorbikes - mine weighs about 222kg and Sam's 148kg, so a fair old load albeit split between the two. Given that I lost my garage when my lovely ex-wife took me for everything I had I want to get some better protection for the bikes (which are currently both stored under Ridehide-type covers) and am thinking about this, or similar:



    Is the floor likely to be able to take the weight of the bikes, or would I need to reinforce it?

    Thanks very much for any help/advice!

  2. #2
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
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    With a lot of shed manufacturers you can spec the floor and various other components, standard floors tend to be flooring grade chipboard which isn't really up to the job of supporting motorcycles.

    If you spec 25mm marine ply for the floor it should outlast the shed and have no problem supporting your bikes. It isn't the cheapest of materials so it will increase the cost overall.

  3. #3
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    Mine is in a purpose built insulated wooden garage/shed/workshop with a concrete floor to my design,no moisture and a good temperature.

    It cost me way less than the sports Rolex that appear on SC,it is only for my bike and tools.

    I think in the long run if you are going to stay riding itís the best option,the only sticking point is finding a good honest builder like mine.


    If you go with that shed get a concrete base laid first.

  4. #4
    Master
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    at one time I had lots of Bikes, some stored in a big wooden shed in the back garden

    concrete floor, then that water proof chipboard

    Wooden shed ventilates better than brick/concrete garage, but ventilation is important to stop condensation

    prepare bikes for winter storage if you do not use them - ACF50 is not bad if you take your time in covering parts of the bike

    remove and drain petrol tank and store indoors, or fill completely if you leave it on the Bike

    mouse traps or appropriate deterrent

  5. #5
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    If getting a concrete base laid, I would recommend installing some ground anchors from a security viewpoint.

  6. #6
    Master sweets's Avatar
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    I really would try and get some decent vapour barrier and insulation into any bike storage, sheds like that warm and cool so much that they pump damp (usually floor level) air in and out and become a corrosion hotbed.
    Floor-wise, some insulation there is helpful but not totally necessary as the floor is less of a warmed/cooled surface. If using a raised floor you will need to double up on the support spacing at least. Put the supports down on a barrier too.

  7. #7
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    One word. Ventilation!

    Well, a few more words.............. check your insurance. Also, shed floor needs to be ventilated underneath or it will be very damp (or use concrete with a damp proof membrane).

  8. #8
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Thanks very much. It would be going on either concrete or slabs, and point taken with regard to ventilation.

    Quote Originally Posted by sweets View Post
    I really would try and get some decent vapour barrier and insulation into any bike storage, sheds like that warm and cool so much that they pump damp (usually floor level) air in and out and become a corrosion hotbed.
    Floor-wise, some insulation there is helpful but not totally necessary as the floor is less of a warmed/cooled surface. If using a raised floor you will need to double up on the support spacing at least. Put the supports down on a barrier too.
    Ah, thanks Dave. You seem to have answered the actual question

    What sort of treatment should the additional supports have (assuming I buy a pre-treated shed)? Are you saying that any shed (with a raised floor) needs to be installed on a waterproof membrane?

    Would another option be to not use a floor within the shed at all?
    Last edited by learningtofly; 17th March 2020 at 09:32.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MonkeyBoy View Post
    If getting a concrete base laid, I would recommend installing some ground anchors from a security viewpoint.
    This all day long , Insurance wise if they are insured as being outside then a quick call to the insurer should confirm no rise in premium. I stored bikes in a shed and asked the builder to put extra floor joists in. But a concrete base would be better

    If using a ground anchor go Pragmasis 16 mm from here. https://securityforbikes.com/security-chains.php
    Or Almax 16 mm upwards.

    Even if you cant go concrete eg not possible use the 16 mm chains to secure on bike to another, prevents the heavy mob just lifting the bike up with two pick axe handles.

  10. #10
    Master blackal's Avatar
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    Ventilation as mentioned many times.

    The weight concentration - I would alleviate by purchasing 4 of those plastic grid-squares for pathways (where the grass grows through). They will spread the load without adding to the overall weight - by much. place under each wheel, or centre-stand if applicable.

    Also as mentioned - check insurance as a shed is probably akin to driveway storage (I see you are doing that already) and put a couple of ground anchors below the shed - protruding up through the floor.

    Any gaps - plug with steel wool (rodents don't chew through that).

    You could also lay some bait traps which would sort the critters out.

  11. #11
    Master sweets's Avatar
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    If you are going to use a concrete slab, you need not use the floor in the shed kit, you can simply fix a "ring beam" of treated timber down onto the slab and screw the shed to that, leaving you to put the bikes on the slab.
    Make sure the slab is the right size, if you extend it beyond the shed it will collect water at the base of the walls - not good.
    Be aware that using a concrete slab is (in planning terms) thought to be a pemanent building, and most sheds (which are usually deemed temporary as they sit on laid flat blocks) are not. Is your area understanding of such matters?
    Concrete is barrier enough for ground misture, and ground anchors are a very good idea.
    Use any foil-backed insulation you can to limit the air movement, and tape the joints with aluminium tape. 50mm will make a massive difference.
    Do not let any window face the sun, or shade it if it cannot be avoided
    D

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by MonkeyBoy View Post
    If getting a concrete base laid, I would recommend installing some ground anchors from a security viewpoint.

    Thatís what I did into the wet concrete though itís stronger if done into dry concrete apparently.

  13. #13
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Just for clarity (and because I'm not intending to throw thousands of pounds at this) I have two options. Firstly, I can remove the existing sheds at the far end of the garden and install there; in that scenario there's an existing concrete slab that extends the full width of the garden. Secondly, I could have a small extension to the existing patio built, which would be big enough to provide a base for the shed; however, as the garden slopes slightly I think it would have to extend beyond the shed base and would need to be bordered by a small retaining wall.

    Seems to me that this will need a fair amount of thought!
    Last edited by learningtofly; 17th March 2020 at 10:51.

  14. #14
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    show us a photo so we can visualise.

    I had to squeeze mine in between my fence and a tree while leaving room to get in and out easy,it took some thought.

  15. #15
    i built mine on a slab base and also put 1" hardboard inside laid over the floor that came with the shed , i'll also echo someone elses point regarding ventilation - dont think you need to go round sealing every nook and cranny as it will just turn into a humidifier and rust things faster.

  16. #16
    Concrete slab with a dpc will probably be the cheapest option Tony. Then a windowless shed with (as mentioned) vents in. Again as mentioned you want the slab the same size as the slab to avoid water running in. Oh and some signs/posters to decorate the inside

  17. #17
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    ...and power to a light

  18. #18
    I still have my ground anchor concreted in front of my house, a painful reminder of the fun I used to have before I had kids 😂.

    If you look online you can by shed bases, frames to stand a shed on, I used one to put some decking on worked great, my advice would be.

    1. Look at getting a shed base down first.
    2. Think about running power so you can plug a battery mate in.
    3. Ground anchor concreted in.
    4. Lights?
    5. Alarm?

    And before you do any of that look not just at shed width but the door with, you know how fiddly it can be squeezing a bike in a tight spot.

    Second thoughts, could you get them through the front door into the living room😁

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweets View Post
    Concrete is barrier enough for ground misture
    D
    Not unless you add a waterproofer. Capillary attraction and tracking will allow moisture to rise up into the shed. A waterproof additive to the mix costs peanuts compared to the damage caused by the moisture. I had a garage with a concrete floor that would literally puddle in wet weather. I had it "tanked" with asphalt in the end!https://masticasphaltcouncil.co.uk/a...tions/tanking/

  20. #20
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    Is a carcoon type product out of the question?


  21. #21
    Whatever shed you end up getting don`t forget to make room for the essentials; a comfy chair, a radio, a lockable filing cabinet and some string.

  22. #22
    Craftsman
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    Put up a steel shed last summer. Bit fiddly to assemble but seems pretty strong. Cheaper than timber and less maintenance. I put it on a concrete slab.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by SNA View Post
    Is a carcoon type product out of the question?

    I think they would steal that and the bike at the same time.
    It's just a matter of time...

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Omegamanic View Post
    I think they would steal that and the bike at the same time.
    A cylinder of helium and you could walk the lot away.

  25. #25
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    Have you looked at concrete sectional garages Tony? A lot more secure imo, probably not a lot more cost wise than a decent shed, maybe better accepted by your insurance, concrete floor so anchor no issue, and can be used to store more than 2 bikes. You can get proper electric in there and it can be used as a workshop for your bikes should you need to. Perhaps not the prettiest, but I'm happy with mine. Mines been up a few years and I cant remember where I got it and what it cost, but this doesn't look bad,

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CONCRETE-...4AAOSwHo5afa7w

    Stuart

  26. #26
    something i forgot to add that some peoplel forget about - check with your insurers , for most insurers a shed is classed the same as leaving your bike on the street by the side of the house -some people think of it as a 'garage' - its not .

    my shed is locked at the bottom of the garden with access from only the front side of the house which also has a large triple locked gate (hell i have trouble getting the bike out) - its still classed as 'on the road ' to my insurer.
    Last edited by pugster; 18th March 2020 at 08:11.

  27. #27
    If you build wood on concrete make sure it is raised on blocks and that the wood has a barrier to prevent it absorbing water from the slab.

    Just completed a floor replacement because the builder of the shed had put it direct on the slab and everything rotted. There also made the shed damp.

    Make sure you have decent overhangs or guttering so rain doesn't run down the sides and onto 5 the slab.

  28. #28
    Craftsman
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    Suggest you check with your insurance as they may be some requirements which they have that materially affect your premium.

  29. #29
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe narvey View Post
    Suggest you check with your insurance as they may be some requirements which they have that materially affect your premium.
    Thanks for the comments/advice, everyone.

    With regard to insurance, anything I do in terms of storage can only be an improvement. Despite the fact that the bikes are in the back garden, protected with approved kit and secured behind a locked gate, my insurers classify that as being ďon the driveď. Whilst itís the cheapest good quality cover I could find (I also have a multicar policy with them), they donít allow for what other insurers term as ďon private propertyĒ.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    Thanks for the comments/advice, everyone.

    With regard to insurance, anything I do in terms of storage can only be an improvement. Despite the fact that the bikes are in the back garden, protected with approved kit and secured behind a locked gate, my insurers classify that as being ďon the driveď. Whilst itís the cheapest good quality cover I could find (I also have a multicar policy with them), they donít allow for what other insurers term as ďon private propertyĒ.
    I have a few bikes. All with trackers, immobilisers, alarms. Almax 19mm chains two each bike plus alarming disc locks. HD CCTV and 5 security staff ona 24hr shift. Behind security barriers and a security shutter.

    Thatís on road parking because the parking space is accessible by other residents.

    Thereís a big difference between brick and concrete, wood and metal, etc.

  31. #31
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe narvey View Post
    I have a few bikes. All with trackers, immobilisers, alarms. Almax 19mm chains two each bike plus alarming disc locks. HD CCTV and 5 security staff ona 24hr shift. Behind security barriers and a security shutter.

    Thatís on road parking because the parking space is accessible by other residents.

    Thereís a big difference between brick and concrete, wood and metal, etc.
    Itís not accessible by other residents - I love in a private house. Other insurers classed it as private property but their premiums were still far, far higher (Iím with Aviva, so not a fly by night either).

  32. #32
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    Itís not accessible by other residents - I love in a private house. Other insurers classed it as private property but their premiums were still far, far higher (Iím with Aviva, so not a fly by night either).
    I need to get out of London...

    Good luck with project to build. Ground anchors, cameras, land mines, crow scaring shotgun trip wires, and a rabid dog.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by sweets View Post
    If you are going to use a concrete slab, you need not use the floor in the shed kit, you can simply fix a "ring beam" of treated timber down onto the slab and screw the shed to that, leaving you to put the bikes on the slab.
    Make sure the slab is the right size, if you extend it beyond the shed it will collect water at the base of the walls - not good.
    Be aware that using a concrete slab is (in planning terms) thought to be a pemanent building, and most sheds (which are usually deemed temporary as they sit on laid flat blocks) are not. Is your area understanding of such matters?
    Concrete is barrier enough for ground misture, and ground anchors are a very good idea.
    Use any foil-backed insulation you can to limit the air movement, and tape the joints with aluminium tape. 50mm will make a massive difference.
    Do not let any window face the sun, or shade it if it cannot be avoided
    D
    Concrete is not a barrier to ground water. That is why damp proof membranes are laid under the slab.

  34. #34
    Master
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    mine has a waterproof membrane with concrete reinforcing steel on top then the concrete.

    The first part of the base for the wood is brick which the membrane also goes over,then insulation etc.

    my builder has refined his shed building over the years and will only build to his high standard he refuses to compromise,he chooses his customers.

  35. #35
    Craftsman skmark's Avatar
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    Hi Tony,

    I have a huge shed which I don't actually keep my bike in but I do drive it into there from time to time if I want to have a fiddle etc. I built the shed from scratch about 20 years ago and I have no issues whatsoever with damp/rot etc. I used treated timber throughout and a floorboards over joists. However, I think the best bit has been the base which I built following advice from a Civil Engineer friend. I dug 8-10 inch trench foundations filled with concrete, then while the concrete was still wet I simply laid breeze blocks onto the surface leveled using a joist and spirit level. Once it had all set I then built the shed floor straight on top of this ring beam type foundation which was about 4-6 inches above ground level. As I'd left 2 inch gaps between each breeze block there is a constant flow of air under the floor. It's worked great for me for 20 years. If you want to have a look feel free to pop round......I'm WFH like most folk these days.

    If/when you build your shed....I'd like first dibs on one of the 'Ridehides' if you come to sell them?

  36. #36
    Craftsman
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    Can only echo what others have said re concrete bases. I had a purpose built wooden shed created for my bikes which has lasted well. Re security, the shed has double doors so after a break in I had a long angle iron bar made with "slots" welded on, two U bolts which go right through the frame and two big padlocks to secure the whole thing. I struggle to do pics on the site but if you would like more info PM me. Cheers, John B4

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