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Thread: Binoculars buying - new or quality old ?

  1. #1
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    Binoculars buying - new or quality old ?

    Iím fancying a set of ďbinsĒ nothing huge magnification, some compact 8x25 or similar and done the usual browsing. Iím aware that some of the older Zeiss, Leica, Leitz German stuff was proper quality of Lens and build and wondering for any given price point will the older stuff be better. Eg for £200 will I get more for my money buying a 1990s pair of Zeiss than a new, no doubt Chinese made set.
    Is it the case that optics and coatings are far better now. Any advice would be appreciated

  2. #2
    Master
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    Sundial is your man.hopefully he'll post.
    I ended up going with a pair of 8x 30 Swarovski CL and couldnt be happier.
    Compact so fits in pocket hence more likely to take with you on trips etc.Amazed with the image quality.

  3. #3
    Modern is better than old across the piece; but the big names are always still worth seeking out.

    See if you can try Leica vs Swarovski vs Nikon etc in store to see what you like, then try to find the best range in the best condition that your budget permits.

    And, if youíre set on 8x25 and understand the trade offs, then I applaud your decision. Donít listen to a bunch of internet opinion on 32s and what have you... everybodyís different :)

    I went with Ultravid 10x25s and have never looked back. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Master thieuster's Avatar
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    Get yourself old Russian binoculars. You can find them for 50 - 100 euro. Like these: https://www.ebay.co.uk/b/Ussr-Binocu.../bn_7023599507 You'll be amazed!

  5. #5
    Master Onelasttime's Avatar
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    I went budget with the Barr & Stroud Sierra 8x32




    They've been brilliant on our regular walks around wetlands and RSPB reserves.

  6. #6
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    I had seen some Leitz/Leica Trinovid 8x20s which can be bought for about £150 used. I just get the impression that age may disadvantage them but then were they better made 20 yrs ago

  7. #7
    Grand Master Mr Curta's Avatar
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    Vintage Zeiss Dialyt 10x40 here, love 'em. Also Celestron 10 x 32 TrailSeekers which I don't mind the kids bashing around.
    Don't Panic

  8. #8
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    Personally, like watches, Iíd always go for used quality over new mediocre. Whatever you do buy, it is very important to try them first. Not every model, regardless of quality/price point, suits every user.


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app

  9. #9
    Master Harry Smith's Avatar
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    Check out the charity shops. Some amazing bargains. I've got 2 pair that were left to me, 8x50 Sears and a neat pair of 10x30 Russian (Cryllic marked) both are super clear.

  10. #10
    Master
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    I bought a pair of 10 x 25 Leicas brand new about 25 years ago and they are still perfect today, however I have looked after them. The advantage of small binoculars is that you carry them and use them more often. If you buy big bulky binoculars, they will only get used now and then because you will soon get fed up with hunking them around.

    I believe that after about 20 years, even top quality binoculars become at risk from fungus and dust inside the lens.

    The best bet, as always, is to buy the best brand new.

  11. #11
    Personally I would endorse the recommendations to go for quality.

    Zeiss, Swarovski and Leica all make great binoculars, and you can pick up some excellent secondhand sets for relatively little money - not £200 admittedly but perhaps £500 to £600.

    Personally I prefer the colour rendition of Leicas (I have two pairs) but the aftercare service from Swarovski is justifiably legendary. Many people I know have sent their battered Swaros off to Austria for refurbishment and received them back in pristine condition and at no charge. I have a Swaro spotting scope and Swaro 8.5x42 binos that are used extensively, and even though probably 15 years old they are still a delight to look through.

    I recently advised someone who wanted a secondhand pair for wildlife watching at dawn and dusk and they ended up getting a pair of Swaro 8x56's from Ace Optics (https://www.aceoptics.co.uk/). I saw them the other day and they were in fantastic condition. I see Ace Optics have a pair of 8x30's at the moment.

    The Zeiss 7x42 and 10x40 BGAT's are also worth looking out for - the prices have dropped compared to a few years ago. Again I know of many sets still in regular use.

    If your budget won't stretch to those then perhaps consider the Zeiss Jena 10x42 Notarems. I have a pair (yes, I have a binocular "problem") and whilst they do not have the optical coatings to deliver an outstanding image they are more than adequate for regular daylight use.

    P.S. Other shops worth looking at for s/h binos are:

    https://www.at-infocus.co.uk/product...ed-binoculars/

    http://rmacleod.co.uk/Category/Optic...rs#&&page=list

    I see Macleod's have a pair of used Leica 10x25 BCA's for £225.......(I have a pair of these as well, great for travelling)
    Last edited by willie_gunn; 28th February 2020 at 09:59.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ashtons99 View Post
    Iím fancying a set of ďbinsĒ nothing huge magnification, some compact 8x25 or similar and done the usual browsing. Iím aware that some of the older Zeiss, Leica, Leitz German stuff was proper quality of Lens and build and wondering for any given price point will the older stuff be better. Eg for £200 will I get more for my money buying a 1990s pair of Zeiss than a new, no doubt Chinese made set.
    Is it the case that optics and coatings are far better now. Any advice would be appreciated
    Great thread as have had similar thoughts and questions

    Thanks

  13. #13
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    New binoculars generally have better performance than older models and the amount you have to spend to get a decent result is coming down all the time.

    The best view for your kind of budget would be a year old/ex demo pair by Hawke or Opticron they have lots of models in budget.

  14. #14
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    I've got a pair of Zeiss Jenoptem 10 x 50 I bought new over twenty years ago and which are still difficult to beat.

    As mentioned earlier they are great for airshows etc but can be a bit cumbersome to carry around so for holidays etc I've got some 8 x 40 Olympus which are excellent and nice and light.

    Funnily enough a couple of years back I bought a pair of Miranda 8 X 30 in excellent nick from a boot sale for 50p which are great for back garden bird watching plus I don't my my Grandsons using them!
    Cheers,
    Neil.

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    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  15. #15
    Master
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    I had a nice pair of bins my Wife bought me in 1976 Nikon, they were expensive but
    very good, lasted really well, I bought myself some Olympus 10x50 £120 and they are brilliant.

  16. #16
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Most binoculars offer good imaging but it's not until someone tries a top of the range e.g., German, Czech, Austrian, Japanese instrument that they can appreciate the difference compared to a Chinese manufactured binocular. Buying secondhand can save £££ if you understand exactly what you're buying and know how to set up a binocular properly … for your own particular eyes ... for optimum imaging/ observing. Time spent studying a few You Tube videos showing how to optimally set up a binocular is well worth the effort. I'm amazed that watch collectors who spend £'000s on e.g. a Rolex watch, are happy to buy a cheap Chinese binocular. Remember that a binocular is in effect two telescopes side by side ... and their combined images when set up properly should give you a superb 3D viewing experience. Would you buy e.g. a £15 telescope? No? But you might be persuaded to buy a cheapo £30 binocular … in effect 2x very average quality £15 telescopes :( . When choosing a binocular consider its field of view and its 'eye relief' … before considering its magnification. If you wear glasses you'll likely need a binocular with at least 15mm eye relief in order to see the whole field of view. However, you can probably adjust the diopter correction of the binocular so that you do not need to wear your glasses. Avoid a too high magnification e.g. 10x and greater because high mag models are more difficult to hold steady. Binoculars with 7 x and 8x magnification are generally easier to use and usually offer a wider field of view. If you're over 50 years of age, avoid binoculars with exit pupils in excess of 6mm … most observers' eyes once we're into our 50s are limited as to their own eyes' entry pupil diameters … a 4mm or 5mm maximum diameter eye entry pupil cannot gather/appreciate the brightness of a 6mm, or 7mm exit pupil binocular. To check a binocular's exit pupil, divide the objective lens diameter by the magnification … e.g. a 7x50 bino has a 50mm diameter objective and 7x magnification … hence 50/7 exit pupil which = 7.14 mm exit pupil diameter … likely a 'too wide' exit pupil for a middle aged observer … but OK for a youngster whose eye entry pupils have not yet 'shrunk' with age. Always best to 'try before you buy' to make sure the binocular's ergonomics, magnification, brightness, weight, and build quality are to your liking. And remember that a good old fashioned porro prism design will likely perform better than a sleek compact roof prism model … especially for astronomical observing. If buying vintage binoculars be aware that their optical coatings may not be as efficient as modern multi-coated designs … and modern phase coated roof prism instruments will likely be a lot brighter than e.g. 1980s roof prism models. If buying secondhand please don't be too concerned about a few scratches on the optics … scratches usually do not compromise the image … and they can be a tool for £negotiating a discount. Some used binocular sellers do not understand what they're selling and often underprice their stock. Three years ago I bought a superb 25 years young Bausch & Lomb Elite 10x42 from a LCE branch for less than £100 … Bausch & Lomb merged with Leica. I showed the binocular to a bird hide observer and he was amazed at the image quality compared to his Chinese model. One of my favourite binoculars is a 1998 Nikon Adventurer HG 8x42 bought s/h from 'In Focus' at Bird Fair 2013 … I tried all their high end s/h models and the Nikon suited me best ergonomically and also imaged the best … even though its optics were visibly scratched … being scratched the price was discounted down to approx £300 but the scratches make no difference to the image.

    https://www.allbinos.com/binoculars_reviews.html … good site for checking binocular reviews and specifications e.g. https://www.allbinos.com/index.html?...tki&test_l=225 … and https://www.allbinos.com/index.html?...tki&test_l=297 … no binocular is perfect … none tick all the boxes as 10/10 … but some tick better than others

    Ace Optics usually has a good selection of s/h binoculars. https://www.aceoptics.co.uk/secondha...acturer=84&p=1 … note price difference between Zeiss T* and Zeiss T* P … latter have Phase coated prisms

    And Cley Spy sell lots of s/h binoculars … https://www.cleyspy.co.uk/used-equip...inoculars.html worth checking daily as they sell quickly

    LCE also worth checking daily https://www.lcegroup.co.uk/Secondhan...n=&Results=100

    Also Ffordes https://www.ffordes.com/c/494/binocu...&f=srt:3&x=srt

    Note some dealers list Leitz binoculars as Leica. Older Leitz models generally do not have as efficient optical coatings as modern Leica instruments.

    dunk
    Last edited by sundial; 28th February 2020 at 18:42.
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" Ö Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  17. #17
    Master Possu's Avatar
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    I bought a Zeiss Terra ED 8x25 a couple of years ago. Iíve been very happy with it. Itís light and compact, so I have it with me fairly often. Itís a budget model from Zeiss and I paid only around 300 euros for it. Well worth a look Iíd say given OPís criteria.

  18. #18
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    Thanks Dunk, very intuitive

    So looking at a binocular Leica Ultravid & Swarovski CL10x25 both showing a 2.5mm exit pupil - are these adequate for 55+ observers eyes

  19. #19
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LRB255 View Post
    Thanks Dunk, very intuitive

    So looking at a binocular Leica Ultravid & Swarovski CL10x25 both showing a 2.5mm exit pupil - are these adequate for 55+ observers eyes
    Fine for daytime use and very portable / compact … but 2.5mm exit pupil might not be so suitable for low light / night time use … because 2.5mm exit pupil does not 'let in' as much light as e.g. a 4mm or 5mm exit pupil. It's possible to measure your eye's own entry pupil diameter and thus determine the most suitable binocular exit pupil diameter for your eyes. There should be a You Tube video demonstrating entry pupil measurement … not to be confused with pupillary distance

    dunk
    Last edited by sundial; 28th February 2020 at 18:17.
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" Ö Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  20. #20
    Master theoriginaldigger's Avatar
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    I have my Dads Canon IS binoculars, they must be 15 years old and aside from the rubberised finish having perished a bit they are still fantastic - a press of the button brings the image stabilisation in to play and you can easily track flying or fast moving objects e.g. birds or race horses.

  21. #21
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    Thanks Dunk, some food for thought there.

    Weíve been down on the north norfolk coast this week, a lot of folk walking around with the twitcher equivalent of a Patek round their neck !

  22. #22
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theoriginaldigger View Post
    I have my Dads Canon IS binoculars, they must be 15 years old and aside from the rubberised finish having perished a bit they are still fantastic - a press of the button brings the image stabilisation in to play and you can easily track flying or fast moving objects e.g. birds or race horses.
    Canon IS binoculars are excellent and punch above their weight as regards image brightness. The only downside is that they need batteries to power the IS but if lithium batteries are fitted they can last several hours and more. I have three Canon IS binos bought s/h and ex demo … they're lent out at star parties and attendees are amazed to observe e.g. Jupiter's moons. I also lend out Ross, and Kershaw, WW2 issue 6x mag. porro prism binoculars (charity shop purchases) … observers are amazed at their imaging quality considering the optics are not coated and the instruments are over 75 years young. 6x mag binoculars have wide fields of view for panoramic views of the night skies.

    dunk
    Last edited by sundial; 28th February 2020 at 20:14.
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" Ö Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  23. #23
    This comes up from time to time, have a search through G&D for binoculars.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    Canon IS binoculars are excellent and punch above their weight as regards image brightness. The only downside is that they need batteries to power the IS but if lithium batteries are fitted they can last several hours and more. I have three Canon IS binos bought s/h and ex demo Ö they're lent out at star parties and attendees are amazed to observe e.g. Jupiter's moons. I also lend out Ross, and Kershaw, WW2 issue 6x mag. porro prism binoculars (charity shop purchases) Ö observers are amazed at their imaging quality considering the optics are not coated and the instruments are over 75 years young. 6x mag binoculars have wide fields of view for panoramic views of the night skies.

    dunk

    I still use the pair you sold me a few years ago, Dunk. I was so impressed with them, I bought the 18x50is for sky watching at night. Chunky, but amazing. I find even after hitting the stabilise button, if you can stay still, the image continues to improves for 10 seconds or so as the stabilisation settles down and has to work less hard.

    Gary

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    Canon IS binoculars are excellent and punch above their weight as regards image brightness. The only downside is that they need batteries to power the IS but if lithium batteries are fitted they can last several hours and more. I have three Canon IS binos bought s/h and ex demo Ö they're lent out at star parties and attendees are amazed to observe e.g. Jupiter's moons. I also lend out Ross, and Kershaw, WW2 issue 6x mag. porro prism binoculars (charity shop purchases) Ö observers are amazed at their imaging quality considering the optics are not coated and the instruments are over 75 years young. 6x mag binoculars have wide fields of view for panoramic views of the night skies.

    dunk

    I still use the pair you sold me a few years ago, Dunk. I was so impressed with them, I bought the 18x50is for sky watching at night. Chunky, but amazing. I find even after hitting the stabilise button, if you can stay still, the image continues to improves for 10 seconds or so as the stabilisation settles down and has to work less hard.

    Gary

  25. #25
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Hi Gary … Good to know the Canon IS binos are still working … they must be quite old now thus VG build quality ref the electronics and optics. I still use the Canon IS 10x42 and IS 15x50 … both have superb bright images.

    dunk
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" Ö Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    Hi Gary Ö Good to know the Canon IS binos are still working Ö they must be quite old now thus VG build quality ref the electronics and optics. I still use the Canon IS 10x42 and IS 15x50 Ö both have superb bright images.

    dunk
    Hi Dunk, is the Canon IS 15x50 the one to get for sky gazing rather than 18x50?

    Reading your comments on exit pupil size and looking at the specs of Canon IS 15x50, 18x50, 10x42 (2.8, 3.3, 4.2 respectively). Is 2.5 vs 3.3 very different in practice? Obviously 10x42s much brighter but lesser FOV.

  27. #27
    Grand Master PickleB's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^^

    Some opinions at this link.

    From which I divine that it's pretty much a matter of personal preference. Apart from the exit pupil, the weight and other parameters, eg which of Canon's IS systems and lens coatings are used, will all have an effect.

    I'd fancied a pair for a long time but put them down as too expensive, even secondhand they fetch a good price. However, I found a pair of 12 x 36 II's that the seller declared as suffering from the sticky rubber problem alluded to above and managed to get them for a very reasonable price. I'm very pleased with them and impressed with their performance.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by PickleB View Post
    ^^^^^^^

    Some opinions at this link.

    From which I divine that it's pretty much a matter of personal preference. Apart from the exit pupil, the weight and other parameters, eg which of Canon's IS systems and lens coatings are used, will all have an effect.

    I'd fancied a pair for a long time but put them down as too expensive, even secondhand they fetch a good price. However, I found a pair of 12 x 36 II's that the seller declared as suffering from the sticky rubber problem alluded to above and managed to get them for a very reasonable price. I'm very pleased with them and impressed with their performance.
    Thanks for link. Very little weight difference in the ones I mentioned. The x50s exactly the same and the other only slightly less - lower powered/FOV but better quality glass.

  29. #29
    Grand Master PickleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Thanks for link. Very little weight difference in the ones I mentioned. The x50s exactly the same and the other only slightly less - lower powered/FOV but better quality glass.
    As you can tell, I'm no expert but rely on the opinions of others (generally as found on the web). My search criteria for buying secondhand were to avoid the earliest models, ie look for a II, but not to stick out for the III version. The later improvements seem to relate to battery life etc rather than optical performance. That said, I also ignored the x25 and x30 models as portability wasn't a concern.

    Returning to your specific question, you may find this of interest...Exit Pupil – The Complete Guide. From which:


    To sum up

    • The average healthy human pupil normally opens about 2mm in daylight, and 7mm in the dark.

    • If you use binoculars with an exit pupil of over 2mm in daylight, you won’t perceive dark images. Brightness will also not improve if you use binoculars with an exit pupil or more than 2mm.

    • However, if you use binoculars with a small exit pupil in the dark, the image will not appear as bright as when seen with the naked eyes or as bright with large exit pupil binoculars.
    Last edited by PickleB; 29th February 2020 at 13:21. Reason: added conclusion from the linked article

  30. #30
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Hi Dunk, is the Canon IS 15x50 the one to get for sky gazing rather than 18x50?

    Reading your comments on exit pupil size and looking at the specs of Canon IS 15x50, 18x50, 10x42 (2.8, 3.3, 4.2 respectively). Is 2.5 vs 3.3 very different in practice? Obviously 10x42s much brighter but lesser FOV.
    I've not noticed any discernible image brightness difference between the Canon IS 10x42 and 15x50 models … but I'll have to set them up side by side to confirm this. Suffice to mention they are both bright and suitable for astro observing. Exit pupil diameter is not the only criterion governing image brightness. Binoculars' internal baffling and optical coatings are the other criteria … as are actual objective diameters. A larger diameter objective binocular will likely 'see' fainter astro targets because the objectives will always gather more light irrespective of actual aperture (i.e. focal ratio or f No.). Canon IS binoculars are renowned for their efficient optics and bright images … thus 'punch above their weight' and are equally as bright as other instruments having larger exit pupils and larger diameter objectives … especially when compared to e.g. budget price binoculars. And yes, FOV is another factor to take into account … FOV largely depends on eyepiece design and decent/efficient eyepieces (oculars) can cost £hundreds. Budget price binoculars do not have high-end eyepieces. One of my brightest binoculars is a Docter Optic Aspectum 80/500 40x80 instrument with an exit pupil of just 2mm …



    Docter Optic Aspectum 80/500 40x80 Observation binocular http://translate.google.it/translate...aspectem_1.php

    … many would assume that such a 40x mag observation binocular with a meagre 2mm exit pupil would not be suitable for astro observing but it's one of the very best because of its efficient optical design, wide diameter objectives and ultra wide field eyepieces with ample eye relief. The 80mm diameter objectives really do gather a lot of light. The oculars are available as individual ultra wide angle telescope eyepieces https://agenaastro.com/noblex-docter...-eyepiece.html … costly, but there is a demand from astro observers seeking efficient eyepieces.

    A few words and a link explaining 'averted vision' to improve our eyes' low light observing ability: When considering entry pupil diameter please be aware that although younger people might have maximum 7mm pupils, by the time they're middle-aged this can reduce to a maximum of less than 5mm … which compromises low light vision. However, our ability to observe fainter / less bright objects can be improved by experimenting with our 'averted vision' … but observers' abilities to use their averted vision varies https://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/a...verted-vision/
    Last edited by sundial; 29th February 2020 at 22:11. Reason: typo
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" Ö Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  31. #31
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    Other Forums

    Hi

    Suggest a look-see on Birding/Hunting forums - many change binos for the latest versions and
    great pre-versions can be had. Swarovski do have 'platinum' service; Zeiss not so.

    Minox do some good mid-range (BG I think, with Argon gas/Schott glass) with life-time warranty.

    Interesting review site - https://www.allbinos.com/

    L-K

  32. #32
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    binos

    I had the chance to test Celestron Cometron 7x50 & Swarovski Habicht 10x40
    TheSwarovski Habicht 10x40 W/GA binoculars that I purschased on ebay, I'd say they would almost compete with the Swarowski EL. I expect the bid to end around $700. They lack the field flattening eyepieces, but center sharpness will probably be the same. Timeless porro prism design, with modern coatings.

    I own a pair of the 8x30w's and they are light, sharp, and fit the hand great... Made the switch from Meostar 8x42s and am glad I did!

    Cometron's views of signs, trees, and a bi-wing airplane that happened to fly by, were as clear and colorful and the Habicht in daylight. The only difference I noticed was that the Habicht has a distinct black "frame" that's visible around the image. The Cometron's image goes nearly to the edge of the binocular's view. I've been using the Cometron for a couple of years, although purchased them exclusively for astronomy) https://wildproofgear.com/best-binoc...or-stargazing/
    So I got used to that frame. In the night sky, both showed sharp stars. On red stars, the color showed in both but was a bit more vivid in the Habicht. That could have simply been due to the small increase in magnification. Again, though, the intensity of red star color was slight. Considering the price gap, the Cometron easily held its own. all Swarowski binos might distinguish itself in more demanding observing tasks, but on this night the Cometron impressed me.

  33. #33
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    I dug out an oldish set of Minox BV 10x 42s Iíve had for a few years and Iíve been getting on with those although you get some funny looks when you walk into RSPB places with cammo binos!

  34. #34
    Grand Master Seamaster73's Avatar
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    The last time there was a long-running binocular thread on here, there were several recommendations for these:

    Olympus Binocular 10 x 50 DPS-1
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0000AKGX3/

  35. #35
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    OP - a word of warning.

    Under no circumstances ever look through these:

    https://www.swarovskioptik.com/hunti...p5x42-p5222897

    unless you have the cash in hand to purchase on the spot.

    If someone lets you look through their pair, decline gracefully.

    There are not many things in the world, that with a bit of hardcore saving, can be bought by everyone, and are functionally perfect.

    These would be one of those things.
    Last edited by Rob (NZ); 2nd April 2020 at 08:39. Reason: typo

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob (NZ) View Post
    OP - a word of warning.

    Under no circumstances ever look through these:

    https://www.swarovskioptik.com/hunti...p5x42-p5222897

    unless you have the cash in hand to purchase on the spot.

    If someone lets you look through their pair, decline gracefully.

    There are not many things in the world, that with a bit of harcore saving, can be bought by everyone, and are functionally perfect.

    These would be one of those things.
    this is true,for many years i collected optics mainly binoculars. one day when i was it bit flush i bought a pair of 10x42 swarovski EL's.once i had used them everthing else i owned seemed crap.nowadays i just have the swarovski's.

  37. #37
    Master murkeywaters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seamaster73 View Post
    The last time there was a long-running binocular thread on here, there were several recommendations for these:

    Olympus Binocular 10 x 50 DPS-1
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0000AKGX3/
    I recommended the Olympus previously but its not the 10x50's, it was the 8x40's, they have a much wider field of view and I can say from experience they are amazing for £59.99 delivered, I'm not saying they are the best built bino you'll hold but mine are beautifully bright and sharp and the wide field is lovely to take in..

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0001M3612/?th=1



    Saying that the 7x35's look even wider field and are more compact so may suit you better, plus they are cheaper at £54.99..

    Last edited by murkeywaters; 1st April 2020 at 10:49.

  38. #38
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    As a side question why do people use binoculars and just a small telescope?


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodder View Post
    As a side question why do people use binoculars and just a small telescope?


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    IME not as convenient to use, binoculars are faster to 'get on target' and more comfortable to hold.

  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Rodder View Post
    As a side question why do people use binoculars and just a small telescope?


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    I do.

    When I am walking the dogs or otherwise not primarily engaged in spotting wildlife I carry a Leica monocular. I find it much more convenient to stick the monocular in a pocket than carry the binoculars. I don't find it particularly hard to use - I just keep looking at the wildlife and then bring the monocular up to my eye.

    I find a proper 3-draw telescope, on the other hand, requires a different technique.

  41. #41
    Master murkeywaters's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rodder View Post
    As a side question why do people use binoculars and just a small telescope?


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    Itís like the difference in sound, ones mono the other is stereo, stereo sounds better..

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob (NZ) View Post
    OP - a word of warning.

    Under no circumstances ever look through these:

    https://www.swarovskioptik.com/hunti...p5x42-p5222897

    unless you have the cash in hand to purchase on the spot.

    If someone lets you look through their pair, decline gracefully.

    There are not many things in the world, that with a bit of harcore saving, can be bought by everyone, and are functionally perfect.

    These would be one of those things.

    You’ve caught my interest !

    Edited ......I’ve just looked at the price !!!!!!!!

  43. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Ashtons99 View Post
    Youíve caught my interest !

    Edited ......Iíve just looked at the price !!!!!!!!
    These are the glasses I have, albeit a slightly earlier version.

    Mine have been through thick and thin and still perform flawlessly.

    The only thing I would consider changing them for would be these: https://www.swarovskioptik.com/hunti...-8x42-p5191943

  44. #44
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    Do these Swarovski binos come up very often 2nd hand or do people keep them for ever at that price

  45. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Ashtons99 View Post
    Do these Swarovski binos come up very often 2nd hand or do people keep them for ever at that price
    They do come up, but mostly the older models such as the SLC's. Some people always have to have the latest model.

    If you look further down this thread I posted some suggested websites to keep an eye on (post @ 9:34 on 28th February), and dunc/sundial has also posted some good links.

    Looking through a pair of Swaros does tend to spoil you. If you try them at dawn/dusk you will soon realise why they are so expensive - they can give you 20-30 minutes more usable light than cheaper binos which, if you need it, is priceless.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by willie_gunn View Post
    They do come up, but mostly the older models such as the SLC's. Some people always have to have the latest model.

    If you look further down this thread I posted some suggested websites to keep an eye on (post @ 9:34 on 28th February), and dunc/sundial has also posted some good links.

    Looking through a pair of Swaros does tend to spoil you. If you try them at dawn/dusk you will soon realise why they are so expensive - they can give you 20-30 minutes more usable light than cheaper binos which, if you need it, is priceless.
    Ah yes, I saw that. Iíve just has a quick look on the usual auction site. What is the difference between the EL and CL ?

  47. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Ashtons99 View Post
    Ah yes, I saw that. I’ve just has a quick look on the usual auction site. What is the difference between the EL and CL ?
    I believe the differences are down to the quality of glass, number of optical components and the coatings.

    Basically CL's are Swarovski's entry level glass, and EL's are their top end (though some still prefer the SLC's). "Entry level" is, of course, mostly relative!

    I have not looked through the CL's other than during regular daytime, so whilst the visual image was good it was not exactly testing conditions.

  48. #48
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    Understood, thanks very much for your insight

  49. #49
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    Binoculars buying - new or quality old ?

    The top of the range binos from the likes of Swaroí, Zeiss, Leica are also known as Alphas, serious optics for serious money, one day I plan on owning a pair..
    Last edited by murkeywaters; 1st April 2020 at 23:14.

  50. #50
    Top range binos are wonderful things to own and use but to be honest if you only use binos occasionally, and then during regular daylight hours, then they are a bit of a waste of money.

    There are some very good binos out there such as Minox, Vortex and others that will do 95% of the job at perhaps 10% of the price.


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