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Thread: watch makers loupe

  1. #1
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    watch makers loupe

    looking to purchase a loupe or 2, 4x and 7x any recommendations?

  2. #2
    Grand Master
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    Not sure what magnification mine are, I have a clip-on that fits my bench glasses, that's marked '3'. I also have a strong one that fits the eye socket and that's marked '1.5' but it's much stronger so possibly the numbers refer to focal length in inches?

    Suggest you buy a few cheap ones and decide which work best for you.

  3. #3
    Master JDB's Avatar
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    I have found 4x serves well - when I can keep the damn thing in place.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDB View Post
    I have found 4x serves well - when I can keep the damn thing in place.
    ill start thier

  5. #5
    Master TKH's Avatar
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    bought these recently for doing bracelet refurbs etc and they are great value keep your hands free and allow use of both eyes ..

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TKH View Post
    bought these recently for doing bracelet refurbs etc and they are great value keep your hands free and allow use of both eyes ..

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    Might get them

  7. #7
    I like AF loupes

  8. #8
    Master Lampoc's Avatar
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    I use pretty basic Cousins screw-rimmed loupes (a x10 and a x4) at £1.50 each and a Bergeon eyeglass holder (£5!). They do the job.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lampoc View Post
    I use pretty basic Cousins screw-rimmed loupes (a x10 and a x4) at £1.50 each and a Bergeon eyeglass holder (£5!). They do the job.
    +1, and theyíre so cheap you can buy a few. Thatís what Iím trying to tell the OP. Once geís decided which he prefers he could shell out on more expensive ones........I never bothered!

    I still use the cheap ones I bought in 2010 and Iíve worked on literally hundreds of watches.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lampoc View Post
    I use pretty basic Cousins screw-rimmed loupes (a x10 and a x4) at £1.50 each and a Bergeon eyeglass holder (£5!). They do the job.
    Sounds exactly what I'm looking for - thanks for the suggestion!!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TKH View Post
    bought these recently for doing bracelet refurbs etc and they are great value keep your hands free and allow use of both eyes ..

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    ordered these

  12. #12
    Craftsman Curtis's Avatar
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    Smile

    I got a free one from my AD but had to buy a Rolex as part of the deal!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lampoc View Post
    I use pretty basic Cousins screw-rimmed loupes (a x10 and a x4) at £1.50 each and a Bergeon eyeglass holder (£5!). They do the job.
    I've just ordered these. My wife has a watch she got from her Swiss grandmother. I'm intrigued by the name on the dial but can't read it.

  14. #14
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    What you will beed is a x20 for inspection purposes if you get really into it, and these donít come cheap, I paid almost £30 for mine. I use it for checking lubrication of pallet stones, inspecting for cracked jewels, and checking the hairspring is centred between the curb pins. I also have a cheap x40 microscope, I could really do with a better one but this does the job (just) for inspecting pivots etc.

    You can go on forever spending money on tools and equipment, I donít mind spending if it gives me an added capability, sometimes there isnít a cheaper alternative and the only answer is to buy Bergeon or Horetec stuff.

    Today I had to replace a jewel using the Seitz jewel press, a tool I picked up off ebay for around £80 a few years ago. I use it rarely, but when I need it I need it. A new one would be around £800.

    To get to a basic level of being able to do most watch work will cost around £2000 at a rough estimate, that includes buying second hand where possible and improvising somewhat( something Iím good at!).

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    What you will beed is a x20 for inspection purposes if you get really into it, and these donít come cheap, I paid almost £30 for mine. I use it for checking lubrication of pallet stones, inspecting for cracked jewels, and checking the hairspring is centred between the curb pins. I also have a cheap x40 microscope, I could really do with a better one but this does the job (just) for inspecting pivots etc.

    You can go on forever spending money on tools and equipment, I donít mind spending if it gives me an added capability, sometimes there isnít a cheaper alternative and the only answer is to buy Bergeon or Horetec stuff.

    Today I had to replace a jewel using the Seitz jewel press, a tool I picked up off ebay for around £80 a few years ago. I use it rarely, but when I need it I need it. A new one would be around £800.

    To get to a basic level of being able to do most watch work will cost around £2000 at a rough estimate, that includes buying second hand where possible and improvising somewhat( something Iím good at!).
    i would us this for 20x
    https://s1132.photobucket.com/user/b...tml?sort=3&o=0

  16. #16
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    With all due respect......you wouldn’t!

    When you’re working on a movement you want to quickly have a better look, the movement is in its holder, you’re part- way through assembly, you don’t want to be messing around trying to get it set up under a microscope.........trust me on this point. If you’re trying to inspect the curb pins and see how the hairsprings behaving you wouldn’t be able to set the movement up under the microscope to see it.

    Invest in a good quality x 20 glass to hold in the eye- socket. If you get into this work you’ll see what I mean.

  17. #17
    Journeyman Pupp's Avatar
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    I was lucky to be given a Quicktest 10x illuminated loupe (incl UV) by a friend who was a jewellery designer. It seems well made and certainly allows close examination so maybe worth a look at what they do.

    I also use a headband magnifier for strap and bracelet changing... I think that came from Tandy when they existed.

    Sent from my SM-G973F using TZ-UK mobile app

  18. #18
    Grand Master
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    I`ve never tried a headband magnifier, I think they may be OK for strap changing etc. but not for movement work which involves getting very close to the movement itself.

    Another point people don't appreciate is the need for a workbench at the correct height, which is around 40". There's a reason for this, to work on movements involves resting your forearms on the bench and you can`t do that comfortably if its too low. Another necessary item is a height adjustable chair, I use a draughtsman's chair (bought from Staples) and it's ideal. These are all things you learn on the BHI training course, seeing a professional workshop/bench set-up is all part of the learning and you then know what to aim for. The technique of resting your forearms on the bench is fundamental, that's how you get the control you need to work safely on small stuff.

  19. #19
    Master Lampoc's Avatar
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    I use a usb microscope attached to a laptop all the time and find it pretty useful.



    I'm with Paul on the headband. I bought one of these and it just gets in the way on close up work:


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bally796 View Post
    ordered these
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Came today very good, leaves both hands free. im lucky enough to have picked one of these up a few years ago very cheap https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/magni...lamps/7660983/. using the head magnifier and the table magnifier I'm getting 5.5 x and comfortable to use

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