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Thread: Camera gear upgrade...

  1. #1
    Master
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    Camera gear upgrade...

    A few months ago I have bought myself my first DSLR, a Canon SL2/200D.

    I am really enjoying myself exploring all kinds of cool features and neat photography tricks and can say that I now feel very well versed into taking good Manual photos.

    It's 'mechanical' feel and by being able to do all the adjustments I want, it really lets me feel good at capturing a good shot.

    In these months, I have bought myself the 10-18mm & 55-250mm standard EF-S Canon lenses (along with 18-55mm) that came with the camera. I also bought the 50mm f1.8 prime, which is truly a cheap & cheerful full frame camera lens which is great for portraits & creamy bokeh.

    I really enjoy Travel/Street & Portrait photography, but also like Macro and lately, I've been dipping my toe into astro-photography (have a lot to learn). I was lately thinking of adding the 17-50mm F2.8 to my lens collection, to replace the kit lens, as this the lens I ultimately use most.

    While I enjoy the 200D, I've been finding it a bit basic. So lately I've used a 6D MKII and really liked the feeling of having a 'professional' feeling camera with the LCD on top and having many buttons, with all adjustments within easy reach.

    It daunted on me, that in the future, should I opt to upgrade my camera I'd also be throwing away many hundreds of Euros in lenses!

    I also know that the most expensive glass on a good APS-c will still not be as good Budget glass on a full frame camera. So, buying EF L Full frame lenses for my 200D, just in case I go full frame later, makes little sense at the time.

    So, should I just wait until I get myself a full frame, before investing in more good quality glass?


    I also like the new 90D a lot, when I handled it, a good quality, APS-c sensor camera, with all the features I could ever need. Also feels very good and satisfying to use. This camera could still make use of all my lenses and so I could sell the 200D.

    I also saw that the Sony A7 II, complete with 24-70 glass is not overly expensive, all things considered.

    So between:

    - Keep 200D, buy the 17-50mm f2.8 & upgrade when time comes
    - Sell 200D, buy 90D
    - Buy 6D Mk II (+ keep 200D)
    - Sell 200D, buy Sony A7 II

    Which would you choose and why ?

  2. #2
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    How do you view your images e.g. as prints or PDIs or via a computer monitor? Do you print your own photographs or do you use a lab? Have you read all the Sony 24-70/4 reviews and noted its reputation for edge unsharpness? You already regret buying the SL2 D200 … you might also regret buying the 6D … or the A7II. You have an excellent camera with a good selection of lenses.The simplest cameras and basic lenses are capable of taking excellent photographs. If you enjoy close-up photography you might consider adding an achromatic supplementary close-up lens … e.g. a Raynox 150 … which will clip onto your existing lenses and produce excellent results indistinguishable for those obtained with a macro lens. You appear to risk developing a classic case of 'gear acquisition syndrome' which may never be cured if hankering after upgrades to your Canon SL2 200D DSLR and lenses after owning them for such a short time.

    dunk
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" … Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  3. #3
    Craftsman
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    This is all the camera you’ll ever need

    https://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.p...-5D-MK2-bundle

    Great camera at an amazing price. I have the MK1 and am so tempted but cant really justify it at present.

  4. #4
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by buddy13 View Post
    I also know that the most expensive glass on a good APS-c will still not be as good Budget glass on a full frame camera. So, buying EF L Full frame lenses for my 200D, just in case I go full frame later, makes little sense at the time.

    So, should I just wait until I get myself a full frame, before investing in more good quality glass?
    The above is simply not true. A good APS-C can match a full frame to all intents these days. The marginal differences are in the low level light and the depth of field. Treat a camera as a throw away item. It is the lenses that make the difference and where the value both monetarily and performance lies. Full frame lenses on APS-C use the middle better part of the glass anyway. Modern cameras are so good these days that most will take a good image. It’s is the ergonomics and how easy you get to the image for the type of photography you like that is key. You are buying into a system with lenses so make sure you are happy with that system. Canon look to be going full on into mirrorless RF mount now but you still have a sea of EF to choose from. Just look at second hand to minimise the trade up or trade across. Lastly if you like the hands on fiddling then the Sony’s are a bit more computerish for want of a better term. Something like a Fujifilm gives you a more old school external dials and controls. Depends what you want from the actual experience of taking the image.

  5. #5
    Master KavKav's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buddy13 View Post
    A few months ago I have bought myself my first DSLR, a Canon SL2/200D.

    I am really enjoying myself exploring all kinds of cool features and neat photography tricks and can say that I now feel very well versed into taking good Manual photos.

    It's 'mechanical' feel and by being able to do all the adjustments I want, it really lets me feel good at capturing a good shot.

    In these months, I have bought myself the 10-18mm & 55-250mm standard EF-S Canon lenses (along with 18-55mm) that came with the camera. I also bought the 50mm f1.8 prime, which is truly a cheap & cheerful full frame camera lens which is great for portraits & creamy bokeh.

    I really enjoy Travel/Street & Portrait photography, but also like Macro and lately, I've been dipping my toe into astro-photography (have a lot to learn). I was lately thinking of adding the 17-50mm F2.8 to my lens collection, to replace the kit lens, as this the lens I ultimately use most.

    While I enjoy the 200D, I've been finding it a bit basic. So lately I've used a 6D MKII and really liked the feeling of having a 'professional' feeling camera with the LCD on top and having many buttons, with all adjustments within easy reach.

    It daunted on me, that in the future, should I opt to upgrade my camera I'd also be throwing away many hundreds of Euros in lenses!

    I also know that the most expensive glass on a good APS-c will still not be as good Budget glass on a full frame camera. So, buying EF L Full frame lenses for my 200D, just in case I go full frame later, makes little sense at the time.

    So, should I just wait until I get myself a full frame, before investing in more good quality glass?


    I also like the new 90D a lot, when I handled it, a good quality, APS-c sensor camera, with all the features I could ever need. Also feels very good and satisfying to use. This camera could still make use of all my lenses and so I could sell the 200D.

    I also saw that the Sony A7 II, complete with 24-70 glass is not overly expensive, all things considered.

    So between:

    - Keep 200D, buy the 17-50mm f2.8 & upgrade when time comes
    - Sell 200D, buy 90D
    - Buy 6D Mk II (+ keep 200D)
    - Sell 200D, buy Sony A7 II

    Which would you choose and why ?
    Not necessarily so! Whilst good glass on full frame will generally give you the best quality, there are little ‘gem’ combinations that are there to be discovered. I know Nikon kit very well indeed as a user over many decades and one of the best low budget gems out there in the market is the Nikon D7200 with the 35mm f1.8 DX lens. This combination produces bitingly sharp results from a fast and cheap lens and I have only seen better on kit that costs ten times more. Great pics are not just about the kit though, it is all about the capabilities and the ‘eye’ of the photographer’ i.e. twenty grand spent on camera kit will not make the owner a great photographer. Photography is one of the greatest ‘never-ending’ learning curves out there!

  6. #6
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by KavKav View Post
    Great pics are not just about the kit though, it is all about the capabilities and the ‘eye’ of the photographer’ i.e. twenty grand spent on camera kit will not make the owner a great photographer. Photography is one of the greatest ‘never-ending’ learning curves out there!

    Absolutely. I’ve been as guilty as anyone of suffering from Gear Acquisition Syndrome which is a very common complaint among photographers.....

    It’s easy to think “if only I could have an updated body / new glass I would be getting far better results “. It rarely happens!

  7. #7
    Master
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    Thanks lots for all your helpful replies :)

    I have read all your advice and certainly agree.

    I'm not saying that buying a 5D MKIV will make me the next best photographer overnight, but we all aspire to have great equipment we enjoy interacting with, which makes our hobby even more fun. It's the same with watches I suppose, in theory we should all be perfectly happy with a G-Shock.

    For now, I'll keep just the 200D. In fact I have just added a 17-50mm F2.8 Sigma lens for it and can't wait to properly test it out.

    I am really enjoying improving composition and taking simpler pictures. The 'exposure' part was the easy part for me. I have even read the Beginner & Advanced (interesting tips & lessons) Canon manuals. I can take Full Manual photos in a heartbeat now and can easily make use of all functions, but of course, the 'eye' & creativity take years to develop.

    I am shooting RAW & am really enjoying manipulating my snaps in Lightroom camera RAW :)

    Next step is to add some filters, ND Grads, polarizers etc and a cheap speedlite (Yongnuo most probably). This will give me plenty playing & growing potential.

    I still love full frame snaps for their High Dynamic Range, sharpness and the quality retained at high ISO (6400 & above). My 200D starts to fall apart at 3200.

    For now, I will not buy more lenses. I have all I need for my current camera.

    In the future, I might still get a Full Frame camera and will then have to get all new lenses to go with it, which is a bit of a shame. Still, I think I'll keep my 200D for it's portability, so it's not a waste of money after all. Thanks again for all your replies.

    PS: Anyone uses the Fuji X-T3? IT seems like a real fun camera to use. Right up my alley, with all the knobs and buttons. I only discovered it a few weeks ago. At the time I bought my 200D, I thought it's all Nikon or Canon.

  8. #8
    Grand Master magirus's Avatar
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    "The Speedliter's Handbook" by Syl Arena is an excellent source of learning for flash photography. Although centered on Canon, the techniques are applicable to any make.

  9. #9
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by buddy13 View Post
    Thanks lots for all your helpful replies :)


    PS: Anyone uses the Fuji X-T3? IT seems like a real fun camera to use. Right up my alley, with all the knobs and buttons. I only discovered it a few weeks ago. At the time I bought my 200D, I thought it's all Nikon or Canon.
    I moved to Fuji from Nikon a couple of years ago (XT-20 and X100) and have never regretted it. Should be some good deals on X-T3s now that the X-T4 has been announced

  10. #10
    Master
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    Yes I have a X-T3. Really good camera. I’m actually gradually buying old manual lenses to use with it via adaptors. The manual focus peaking works really well. As said the X-T4 launch should see some prices drop.

  11. #11
    X-T3 here too, a camera you just want to pick up and take some photos with :)

    I came to Fuji via an X100 which shared duties with my old EOS for motorsports, but moved over to the X-T3 and the 50-140 for my motorsport and is great

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by reecie View Post
    The above is simply not true. A good APS-C can match a full frame to all intents these days. The marginal differences are in the low level light and the depth of field.
    Tempting to say "the above is simply not true"

    For certain areas of specialisation such as wildlife and sports photography, full frame still more than holds its own.

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