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Thread: Thoughts on owning a dog with a full time job

  1. #51
    As dogs mature, leaving them for extended periods is less of an issue in my experience. However, the most important period for the dog is it’s first 6 -12 months. Here they need your time and presence to train, socialise, and establish a sense of security.

    Depending on the breed a pair of dogs may help interms of companionship during extended absence , but you will still need to plan a high level of attendance and availability in the critical first 8 - 12 weeks after leaving the litter.

    I am not one to assert what others should or should not do, but we only took on our first dog when one of us was available at home full time, or maximum 2-3hrs absent. We will take in our 7th dog in 20yrs soon, at one point we had three Great Danes weighing in at a combined 250kg. Not sure I could have a home without a dog now, but you do need to have the time to give them.
    Last edited by I AM LATE!; 10th February 2020 at 23:05.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by I AM LATE! View Post
    As dogs mature, leaving them for extended periods is less of an issue in my experience. However, the most important period for the dog is itís first 6 -12 months. Here they need your time and presence to train, socialise, and establish a sense of security.
    Agreed.
    Andy

    Wanted - Damasko DA38 or DC80 Green - not the black versions. Bell & Ross BR03-92 Nightlum

  3. #53
    Master
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    I don't want to tell people what they should and shouldn't do but I do agree that dogs shouldn't be left for long periods on their own. I think this view is also echo'd by dog charities and dog welfare organisations.

    I do realise that people live busy lives and that circumstances can change. Mine certainly did and as my career took off after a few years into ownership of my Lucy I wasn't arround for weeks and often months. Luckily my retired parents were there to help out and she now pretty much lives with them. I take her off their hands on weekends when I can. I'm very lucky to have them as a resource and Lucy literally has the life of Riley!

  4. #54
    Master
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    This is the reason we don't have one.
    The wife would love to & I'm reasonably keen, but with our current lifestyles it just wouldn't be fair.

  5. #55
    Craftsman
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    Jun 2018
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    I have 2 dogs, my wife and I both work full time, with the majority of that time spent away from home.

    Our dogs go to day care or we have a dog walker who comes twice a day, so there are ways of doing it responsibly and to the benefit of the dog.

  6. #56
    Journeyman
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    Mar 2017
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    I wouldn't recommend leaving a young dog at all but if you have to I would suggest using a cage and cover all but one side so the dog feels it's in it's "den" and is safe. Young dogs often choose to sleep in their cage as it's their safe space.

  7. #57
    Craftsman
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    Dec 2013
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    My wife and I have a German Shepherd called Tia who is now 8 years old. We thought long and hard before taking the plunge, as like you, we both worked full time.

    Our solution was to have a dog walker come in daily which involved a 1 hour walk with other dogs and around 15 minutes of travelling either side of the walk itself. Coupled with a frozen stuffed Kong just as we leave for work and another from the dog walker when she is dropped off home, Tia has coped very well. I should add that she is taken out for a half hour walk in the morning also.

    For the last few years my wife works 2.5 days and as I work in a school, I get great holidays so things are even better for Tia now. We set her up in an open crate in our hall which is her snug den when we are working but also allows her access to the kitchen without having the full run of the house.

    All in all then, itís definitely possible without having a negative impact on the dog.

    HTH

    Martin

  8. #58
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    What full time job does your dog have?.
    4 days later & still smiling when I see the title appear. Well done sir!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #59
    Master wildheart's Avatar
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    I had a German Shepherd for many years, but my then wife worked from home. I walked him in the morning and at night. When we split up he had to be rehoused, it broke my heart. If your not going to be there for the animal you should not have one in my view. I'll get another dog when I retire but not before then.

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