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Thread: micro 4/3 or aps c

  1. #1
    Craftsman bowie's Avatar
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    micro 4/3 or aps c

    any thought's on if it's still a good idea to get a micro 4/3 camera i like the look of a olympus om-d e-m10 mark ii is it wise to get or stay with the larger sensor. thanks

  2. #2
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    Larger sensor has better image quality throughout the iso range.

    Smaller sensor come in smaller, lighter bodies so its all about what you think is best for yourself.

    A ton of people are ditching larger heavy cameras in exchange for small, light ones because they are fed up

  3. #3
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowie View Post
    any thought's on if it's still a good idea to get a micro 4/3 camera i like the look of a olympus om-d e-m10 mark ii is it wise to get or stay with the larger sensor. thanks
    Are you going by looks or photographic potential?

    All M4/3 cameras are worth considering but depends on the type of photography you want to pursue and the types of results required. If you can post your requirements you'll have more replies.

    Bear in mind that DOF-wise, M4/3 images aways have double the depth of field for any given aperture compared to the FF equivalent … which has both advantages and disadvantages … e.g. not so good for serious portraiture if you require OOF backgrounds.

    One consideration with M4/3 is the fact that new cameras are announced relatively frequently … thus they can depreciate relatively quickly.

    Which camera / format are using currently?

    IMO a used full frame Sony A7 II takes a lot of beating because:

    1) £reasonable 2) it's compact 3) can be used with many legacy lenses via adapters and with IBIS 4) standard 28-70mm kit lens is superb … and can easily be adapted for macro by adding an achromatic supplementary close-up lens. Used Sony FE 28-70 can bought for £100 - £150 5) full frame 24x36 images can be cropped with impunity.

    dunk
    Last edited by sundial; 25th January 2020 at 21:15.
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" … Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

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    When I started cycling I was informed of the old adage, "cheap, light, strong - pick whichever two you like".

    Similarly with photography there's always a compromise. M4/3 is compact, gives you great "reach" due to the great digital crop, has good DOF. A system will probably be cheaper than full frame, or APS-C.

    On the other hand it's not as easy to attain shallow depth of field, the sensors cannot be as good in difficult light situations (e.g. low light), battery life is often worse than DSLR (although that's true for all mirrorless).

    I think it's a case of weighing up which compromises are important, and the resulting decision is different by person. In the past low light performance was important for me, and I carried a heavy full frame DSLR (results were incredible, but my shoulder and neck less happy). Recently I changed systems and thought seriously about M4/3. but ended up with a compact APS-C, which I thought a good balance of both worlds. If wildlife was still as important to me I might have gone M4/3, for the extra 'reach' with a compact system.

    TLDR - There's no wrong answer, it totally depends upon each person's needs.

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    Craftsman bowie's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies, Sony a6000 a better option then I think.

  6. #6
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowie View Post
    Thanks for the replies, Sony a6000 a better option then I think.
    No IBIS with A6000 … the A6500 does have IBIS. A friend uses both in preference to his A7II … because he prefers less bulk. But the A7II is still used when he wants extra quality.

    dunk
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" … Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

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    Craftsman bowie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    No IBIS with A6000 … the A6500 does have IBIS. A friend uses both in preference to his A7II … because he prefers less bulk. But the A7II is still used when he wants extra quality.

    dunk
    back to the drawing board what about an Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II( got my head buzzing)

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Senninha View Post
    When I started cycling I was informed of the old adage, "cheap, light, strong - pick whichever two you like".

    Similarly with photography there's always a compromise. M4/3 is compact, gives you great "reach" due to the great digital crop, has good DOF. A system will probably be cheaper than full frame, or APS-C.

    On the other hand it's not as easy to attain shallow depth of field, the sensors cannot be as good in difficult light situations (e.g. low light), battery life is often worse than DSLR (although that's true for all mirrorless).

    I think it's a case of weighing up which compromises are important, and the resulting decision is different by person. In the past low light performance was important for me, and I carried a heavy full frame DSLR (results were incredible, but my shoulder and neck less happy). Recently I changed systems and thought seriously about M4/3. but ended up with a compact APS-C, which I thought a good balance of both worlds. If wildlife was still as important to me I might have gone M4/3, for the extra 'reach' with a compact system.

    TLDR - There's no wrong answer, it totally depends upon each person's needs.
    This is the perfect response to the question. Each individual will have his own view, but only the OP can decide which will work best for him.

    Don’t underestimate the importance of the surrounding ecosystem too - can you get the focal lengths you need at an optical quality and price point that you’re happy with? Adapters of any stripe are often best avoided...

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    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    No IBIS with A6000 … the A6500 does have IBIS. A friend uses both in preference to his A7II … because he prefers less bulk. But the A7II is still used when he wants extra quality.

    dunk
    I use an A7Rii and an a6300. They are indeed a fantastic pair to own and, whilst the a6300 also lacks IBIS, there are plentiful lenses with OSS (so it's not really a problem - in fact, having lens-specific stabilisation is arguably a bonus).

    I also love the slightly cooler colour rendition from Sony sensors, and I guess that might also be a factor when decision-making.

  10. #10
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    What do you wish to use the photos for? What lenses / format do you currently use? I used to use both 4/3 and M4/3 and enjoyed using them - until changing to full frame and APS-C. I have not used my Olympus EM-1 in years … still a decent camera but for my purposes FF is better. I also use Nikon 1 with a tiny 1" sensor but only for specific assignments - usually for reconnaissance trips when need to travel very light. If I was taking up bird photography for the first time I'd consider M4/3 i.e. Panasonic / Olympus M4/3 … but only because the Panasonic M4/3 100-400mm lens would be useful (200-800mm FF equivalent). You might consider trying a M4/3 camera before buying … maybe take a memory card with you to a dealer … or attend a camera show https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/a...u-need-to-know

    dunk
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" … Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  11. #11
    Craftsman bowie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JGJG View Post
    This is the perfect response to the question. Each individual will have his own view, but only the OP can decide which will work best for him.

    Don’t underestimate the importance of the surrounding ecosystem too - can you get the focal lengths you need at an optical quality and price point that you’re happy with? Adapters of any stripe are often best avoided...
    thanks will have to go in the shop and have a play

  12. #12
    Grand Master Griswold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    No IBIS with A6000 … the A6500 does have IBIS. A friend uses both in preference to his A7II … because he prefers less bulk. But the A7II is still used when he wants extra quality.

    dunk
    IBIS?

    How on earth did we manage in the days of film

    The best camera is the one you have in your hand.
    Best Regards - Peter

    I hate being bipolar, its brilliant.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    What do you wish to use the photos for? What lenses / format do you currently use? I used to use both 4/3 and M4/3 and enjoyed using them - until changing to full frame and APS-C. I have not used my Olympus EM-1 in years … still a decent camera but for my purposes FF is better. I also use Nikon 1 with a tiny 1" sensor but only for specific assignments - usually for reconnaissance trips when need to travel very light. If I was taking up bird photography for the first time I'd consider M4/3 i.e. Panasonic / Olympus M4/3 … but only because the Panasonic M4/3 100-400mm lens would be useful (200-800mm FF equivalent). You might consider trying a M4/3 camera before buying … maybe take a memory card with you to a dealer … or attend a camera show https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/a...u-need-to-know

    dunk
    good advise thanks

  14. #14
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    ^^^^ We managed … but did not have the temptation to use legacy lenses on mirrorless cameras … which can save a small fortune if needing to use e.g. long lenses / tilt & shift lenses / macro lenses.

    dunk
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" … Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  15. #15
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    Whatever you decide, you could save £££ by considering buying secondhand from a reputable dealer

    https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/used-equip...lympus-lenses/

    https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/used-equip...ystem-cameras/

    dunk
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" … Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

  16. #16
    Grand Master Griswold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    ^^^^ We managed … but did not have the temptation to use legacy lenses on mirrorless cameras … which can save a small fortune if needing to use e.g. long lenses / tilt & shift lenses / macro lenses.

    dunk
    It was said tongue in cheek Dunk - did you miss the smiley?

    Photography has progressed to such a point, technologically, that it's becoming hard to take a bad photograph. Manufacturers have spent millions developing algorithms to cover pretty much any eventuality - to the point where it's simpler to select the correct 'mode' than to think every shot and setting through.

    I started out in photography with a Box Brownie Flash, essentially point, compose and shoot. My current Fuji's give me that same ability all those years later, except that I get more keepers due to the technology inside the bodies. They also give me the ability to be creative if I choose to do so. I don't think there's a bad camera system around these days.

    It's more important how a camera feels in your hands, how you interact with it. If a camera feels uncomfortable in your hands, if the menu system seems over complex, if changing settings quickly and easily isn't, then it may be the best camera in the world according to experts - but you won't take as many photographs with it as you would with one that meets those criteria. I gave up on Nikon for that very reason, and is why I chose Fujifilm.

    Oh, and talking about saving money on lenses; I built my own telephoto lens for my Box Brownie all those years ago from a broken microscope and the cardboard inner from an Izal toilet roll. They don't come cheaper than that.
    Best Regards - Peter

    I hate being bipolar, its brilliant.

  17. #17
    Craftsman bowie's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Griswold View Post
    It was said tongue in cheek Dunk - did you miss the smiley?

    Photography has progressed to such a point, technologically, that it's becoming hard to take a bad photograph. Manufacturers have spent millions developing algorithms to cover pretty much any eventuality - to the point where it's simpler to select the correct 'mode' than to think every shot and setting through.

    I started out in photography with a Box Brownie Flash, essentially point, compose and shoot. My current Fuji's give me that same ability all those years later, except that I get more keepers due to the technology inside the bodies. They also give me the ability to be creative if I choose to do so. I don't think there's a bad camera system around these days.

    It's more important how a camera feels in your hands, how you interact with it. If a camera feels uncomfortable in your hands, if the menu system seems over complex, if changing settings quickly and easily isn't, then it may be the best camera in the world according to experts - but you won't take as many photographs with it as you would with one that meets those criteria. I gave up on Nikon for that very reason, and is why I chose Fujifilm.

    Oh, and talking about saving money on lenses; I built my own telephoto lens for my Box Brownie all those years ago from a broken microscope and the cardboard inner from an Izal toilet roll. They don't come cheaper than that.

    ha ha that made me smile

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    Whatever you decide, you could save £££ by considering buying secondhand from a reputable dealer

    https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/used-equip...lympus-lenses/

    https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/used-equip...ystem-cameras/

    dunk
    thanks will have a look cheers

  18. #18
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    You're all wrong...

    Fuji is the answer hahahah (Fuji fan boy here)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by knw101 View Post
    You're all wrong...

    Fuji is the answer hahahah (Fuji fan boy here)
    Having had five and currently having three I have to agree, they are something special

    Their optics are rather good too.

    Oh, and I wish I'd kept the S5 Pro, there was something about the DR with that camera, not matched by the current models IMO.
    Best Regards - Peter

    I hate being bipolar, its brilliant.

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