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Thread: 1917

  1. #51
    Grand Master ryanb741's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingBanana View Post
    I know I'm nit-picking here, but in the first few minutes of 1917 I spotted what I think was a sloppy historical innacuracy.

    One of the characters refers to enjoying some turkey over Christmas, but I'm pretty sure that the eating of turkey at Christmas is a relatively recent thing in the UK (led by the US), and a hundred years ago it would almost certainly have been goose or beef.

    Am I right?
    Apparently the English have been eating Turkey at Xmas since the 16th century. That's what wikipedia says anyway

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  2. #52
    Grand Master PickleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingBanana View Post
    I know I'm nit-picking here, but in the first few minutes of 1917 I spotted what I think was a sloppy historical innacuracy.

    One of the characters refers to enjoying some turkey over Christmas, but I'm pretty sure that the eating of turkey at Christmas is a relatively recent thing in the UK (led by the US), and a hundred years ago it would almost certainly have been goose or beef.

    Am I right?
    See this link for Turkeys reared for the mess, December 1916:


    courtesy of the National Army Museum

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by bond View Post
    I noticed one of them in a gold cased wristwatch with a leather strap. It looked out of place. I suppose it's a minor but even from the trailer it stuck out like a sore thumb

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    Or the usual issue of everyone has perfect teeth!

  4. #54
    Master alfat33's Avatar
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    1917

    Fascinating to hear of some posters’’ family connections with WW1. I have mixed feelings in this respect. My great-uncle fought in WW1 and died as a result of his participation, about 10 years after the war ended. He was a gifted amateur artist and left behind a notebook with many drawings, mainly of places where he was stationed rather than military subjects.

    However he was a chemist by training and was in the British Army unit responsible for chemical warfare. We even have some photos taken from an observation balloon he was in over the battlefield, presumably planning the next attack.

    He died of a lung disease. I’m not sure of the details but I suppose handling all that gas was the cause.

    I guess he was just one of millions doing their duty and I don’t judge him for that, but most WW1 reminiscing is rightly about the poor sods in the trenches and he doesn’t quite fit into that narrative, in fact he must have caused a lot of misery.

    I haven’t seen 1917. It sounds both moving but also very modern. I think I am at an age where I find a bleak look on the face of Alec Guinness much more moving than any amount of modern cinematic wizardry.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyCasper View Post
    There was a BBC factual drama series in 2014 called ‘Our World War’. Episode 1 was ‘The First Day’ and is about Mons.

    (JoJo Rabbit is on my list to see)


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    Thank you for the recommendation; I did not know that and missed the series whilst away in another war (!).
    I'll look to see it.

    Br,
    AP.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.Pottinger View Post
    I'd very much like to see an historically accurate film made about the opening part of the Great War (WW1), i.e. the famous battle of Mons and subsequent 'race for the coast'. A very different view of the war before trenches were largely 'sunk'.
    Not long ago, I was reading about my great grandfather in a regimental war diary and who was part of these as a professional soldier. Interesting, (given current 'debates') he fought alongside another regiment several times that was from the North West Frontier who were renowned fighters.
    Mons has a dedicated Great War museum and the canal (and bridge) where the BEF held off vastly larger forces and saw the action that was awarded the first VC of WW1 remains.
    The British Embassy leaves a wreath there on anniversaries. Last time I went it was still serenely there.
    My grandfather had been in the army since 1899 when the war started and fought at Mons too, surviving the whole war unscathed, physically.
    The small British army of 80,000 which were all regulars gave the Germans who were mainly conscripts a good battering.
    It was at Mons where the Germans thought the British infantrymen were using machine guns, so rapid was there rifle fire.
    I worked with a bloke years ago who's granddad swore he saw the angel of Mons.

  7. #57
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RD200 View Post
    My grandfather had been in the army since 1899 when the war started and fought at Mons too, surviving the whole war unscathed, physically.
    The small British army of 80,000 which were all regulars gave the Germans who were mainly conscripts a good battering.
    It was at Mons where the Germans thought the British infantrymen were using machine guns, so rapid was there rifle fire.
    I worked with a bloke years ago who's granddad swore he saw the angel of Mons.
    He wasn't the only one https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angels_of_Mons

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by RD200 View Post
    My grandfather had been in the army since 1899 when the war started and fought at Mons too, surviving the whole war unscathed, physically.
    The small British army of 80,000 which were all regulars gave the Germans who were mainly conscripts a good battering.
    It was at Mons where the Germans thought the British infantrymen were using machine guns, so rapid was there rifle fire.
    I worked with a bloke years ago who's granddad swore he saw the angel of Mons.
    Fascinating, and definitely a 'few' who were there and what became a mythical (and quite well documented) battle.
    There is some literature on the 'Angel of Mons' phenomenon including use of it by the government during dark days.
    The BEF were, by and large, highly professional (though a small) and as part of a model that was quite different to the Continental norm (of largely conscript armies).
    The rapid rate of accurate fire was as a result of a training regime with high standards that proved quite shocking (and costly to opponents), however, the size of the opposing forces in this battle was far in excess of the BEF, who covered the French retreat in this area (bearing the brut of bold manoeuvre in force). How the war changed, what with trenches and artillery, etc.,.

    Br,

    AP.

  9. #59
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    My wife's grandfather fought in WW1, he was in tanks. He told me they washed themselves and their clothes in fuel to kill the lice. I wish I'd recorded some of the stories he told me.

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  10. #60
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    They shall not grow old by Peter Jackson added voices to these young men and instead of it being jumpy vague pictures from 100+ years ago, they were all real.
    First world war in colour covered all the protagonists and made it seem like they all knew they going to war but didn't know why???

  11. #61
    Grand Master TheFlyingBanana's Avatar
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    Thank you Ryan and PickleB for ths info - most interesting!

    I was very much under the misapprehension that prediliction for this rather tasteless bird was a relatively recent marketing thing.
    So clever my foot fell off.

  12. #62
    Watched this last night on an iMax screen, sound and visuals were was fantastic.

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