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Thread: DIY 101

  1. #51
    Craftsman
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    Iím all for doing stuff myself but recently am more of the attitude of working out the cost of buying kit + a day off work vs. the cost of a professional (doing it in half the time).

    That said, an SDS* + chisel should only be about £120 and it shouldnít be massively difficult to do once the first tile is up. Itís just when the professional then says ďooh - that'll need sorting before I start tilingĒ and he charges you another day anyway!

    * this is the one I bought - Bosch GBH2000

    Iím likely to go through the same process in a few months so let us know how you get on.

    Also, is tiling-over-tile not an option?
    Last edited by gavsw20; 10th January 2020 at 09:22.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by gavsw20 View Post
    I’m all for doing stuff myself but recently am more of the attitude of working out the cost of buying kit + a day off work vs. the cost of a professional (doing it in half the time).

    That said, an SDS + chisel should only be about £120 and it shouldn’t be massively difficult to do once the first tile is up. It’s just when the professional then says “ooh - that'll need sorting before I start tiling” and he charges you another day anyway!

    I’m likely to go through the same process in a few months so let us know how you get on.

    Also, is tiling-over-tile not an option?
    Did mine on my days off,so no taking days off work!.And only tools required were a chisel and hammer,don't know why people are always referring to power tools here!,it's a very very simple DIY task were talking about here.Its not a skilled job removing tiles from the floor.

    Chisel & Hammer and get down to it,you'll be surprised how fast you'll have them up.

    2/3 or 4" chisel & not too big "lump" hammer.
    Last edited by P9CLY; 10th January 2020 at 09:27.


  3. #53
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    ^^
    This really depends on the type of support they were laid on and the adhesive used. It can be very easy, when every tile you lift starts lifting the ones around it. It can also be a bastard where you chisel every bit of the tile off the support.
    Don't take my silence for agreement. I've just realised you're too stupid to argue with.

  4. #54
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    A tiled floor laid by a professional using the correct adhesive should be a massive bastard of a job, I've smashed dozens up and you can always tell the ones that have been done by a pro. Don't underestimate it just because a few people got lucky with theirs. Out of interest why are you painting the skirts before laying a new floor? Aren't you fitting new ones once the tiles are down?

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    ^^
    This really depends on the type of support they were laid on and the adhesive used. It can be very easy, when every tile you lift starts lifting the ones around it. It can also be a bastard where you chisel every bit of the tile off the support.
    100% agree it can be a bastard,but remember,If you as a "Man" thinks it beyond you!,it will only be another "Man" you will be paying to do what you can do too.

    That was always my point.

    Id be the first to leave the country on my private jet if major building work was needed at my mansion,but I'm an average Joe who doesn't mind doing a little DIY,and it can save a huge amount of money by doing it.

    Just a thought,I'm 60 and always did and have put my hand to most jobs around the house,I'd guess many in their 30's and certainly many much younger could even tackle a light bulb or change a plug!!.Id guess a fair few "professional" people are pretty much useless in the DIY dept,but very good at the profession they have chosen,and I know many that fit into that description because I've done some very low level DIY for Freinds,eg putting shelves up,and wall papering!!.

    I didn't say ALL Professional People mind!.I speak from experience of some I know,and IMO.

    And having said all the above,I'm happy it keeps the wheels of employment turning for others doing work that some won't at least try.
    Last edited by P9CLY; 10th January 2020 at 16:14.


  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by mickylall View Post
    Out of interest why are you painting the skirts before laying a new floor? Aren't you fitting new ones once the tiles are down?
    *tries to appear knowledgeable, fails*

    Historically, I haven't been great at removing skirts.

    *waits for incoming joke*

    Should I remove the skirting at the same time as removing the tiles then?

  7. #57
    Master mickylall's Avatar
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    Definitely, if they come off ok you can re-use them just sit them on top of the finished tiles and it will look a far better job

  8. #58
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    ^Thanks.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    *tries to appear knowledgeable, fails*

    Historically, I haven't been great at removing skirts.

    *waits for incoming joke*

    Should I remove the skirting at the same time as removing the tiles then?

    If the tiles are under the skirting then you might not have a choice. If not then I would leave in-situ, put down the new floor and mask, sand and apply whatever finish you want.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  10. #60
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    So, removing skirting boards ... where the top of the board meets the wall, run a stanley knife along the join to cut through the paint - it'll save a lot of mess.


    Now, back to the tiles. Here is the experience of Canadian YouTuber AvE, who as you may know is a pretty handy fellow (contains some ripe language)


  11. #61
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    ^Thanks Andy and Hogthrob.

    I have been distracted by trying to paint some kitchen doors (unsuccessfully), so the tile mayhem has been postponed until the kitchen bloke pops round to survey what damage I have done so far. Quite a lot, is my guess.

    I expect a lot of teeth sucking and whistles along with comments such as:

    "What happened here?"

    and

    "Jesus! Is that live?"

    and

    "Please tell me you used a manifold sprocket and a flange bracket?"

    or even

    "That's a supporting wall!"

    While we're talking about bodging stuff, one area where I'm keen to ensure there are no short cuts is the heating system. I think it needs a new programmer. Was thinking of wireless. Presumably this is relatively cheap to install even if it's done by a qualified heating engineer?

  12. #62
    Master mickylall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    ^Thanks Andy and Hogthrob.

    I have been distracted by trying to paint some kitchen doors (unsuccessfully)
    I do this for a living, if you want any advice just ask

  13. #63
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    ^Thanks Micky.

    *clears throat, tries to look knowledgeable*

    There's a kitchen in situ which is tired completely FUBAR. I'm hoping to divert some of the kitchen budget into the man cave budget.

    The kitchen cupboards are a shaker style which looks ok but they aren't very good quality. Some kind of chipboard covered with a plastic wrap from the 70s.

    I was going to try and keep the cupboards by painting them with primer and then a top coat of something subtle - international emergency orange perhaps? Fluorescent green maybe. No, no - some kind of light grey seems to be the ticket.

    Am I wasting my time and should I just get a new kitchen? I can imagine the finish is difficult to get right. Maybe a wrap would work?

  14. #64
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    I own an SDS drill (only the cheap Lidl one) and as previously reported, did it with a bolster and club hammer. The tiles largely came off in wholes or halfs. If you use a power tool the vibration is very fatiguing and you'll end up with much more mess. Simplest solution, always the simplest solution. Plus the manual way is rather satisfying and I suspect no slower.

    The trick is to not just bash the bolster but to try and push the momentum of the hammer in to it so it has to go forward and under the tile.

  15. #65
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    If the units are good enough just buy new doors. Much better than an amateur paint job.
    Don't take my silence for agreement. I've just realised you're too stupid to argue with.

  16. #66
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mickylall View Post
    I do this for a living
    What, paint kitchen doors unsuccessfully?

  17. #67
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    ^Thanks Andy and Hogthrob.

    I have been distracted by trying to paint some kitchen doors (unsuccessfully), so the tile mayhem has been postponed until the kitchen bloke pops round to survey what damage I have done so far. Quite a lot, is my guess.

    I expect a lot of teeth sucking and whistles along with comments such as:

    "What happened here?"

    and

    "Jesus! Is that live?"

    and

    "Please tell me you used a manifold sprocket and a flange bracket?"

    or even

    "That's a supporting wall!"

    While we're talking about bodging stuff, one area where I'm keen to ensure there are no short cuts is the heating system. I think it needs a new programmer. Was thinking of wireless. Presumably this is relatively cheap to install even if it's done by a qualified heating engineer?
    i just replaced my central heating programmer, receiver and central heating zone valve on a like for like basis. It took me about 30 minutes to replace the motorised zone valve (which has 4 wires) (make sure its isolated from the mains because it carries 240v). 5 minutes to replace the receiver (2 screws - plug an play) and another 5 minutes to change the programmer (Drayton Digitstat Rf2), however before you do this you need to pair the programmer to the receiver, which requires a couple of button pushes, inserting the battery before hanging it on the wall. Simples if you can read. If not get SWMBO to read it out and follow the instructions. A pro will charge you at least 1 hour, plus will supply the bits at retail - I got mine at trade👍

    Be careful about the wireless ones as these most likely need to be hardwired in to boiler and or may need a fixed ethernet connection to the router (which assumes you have a spare slot). Lots of grief, but ideal if you want to fiddle with you heating when away. Like you do

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    Its not really free is it,we all pay tax for this sort of service.Rather like going on an all inclusive holiday and saying the food and drinks are free!..........

    Its been paid for.

    Imo a council worker should see what is been thrown away that could be re-used,as the tv programme.I hate waste,it shouldn't be just discarded because your colour scheme changes!.
    No, of course itís not really free but you know what was meant. Some councils just canít afford to do this w/o charging extra - priorities set by our elected representatives.

  19. #69
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    ^Thanks Micky.

    *clears throat, tries to look knowledgeable*

    There's a kitchen in situ which is tired completely FUBAR. I'm hoping to divert some of the kitchen budget into the man cave budget.

    The kitchen cupboards are a shaker style which looks ok but they aren't very good quality. Some kind of chipboard covered with a plastic wrap from the 70s.

    I was going to try and keep the cupboards by painting them with primer and then a top coat of something subtle - international emergency orange perhaps? Fluorescent green maybe. No, no - some kind of light grey seems to be the ticket.

    Am I wasting my time and should I just get a new kitchen? I can imagine the finish is difficult to get right. Maybe a wrap would work?
    A wrap is an excellent way, cheap, effective and easy to change. One alternative could be to get/hire a spray gun and use that, or you could use a gloss roller to avoid brush marks, but make sure you prepare the surface well with a good primer. At the end of the day it depends on the finish you are looking for. New doors will cost you, plus you then need to get them fitted.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  20. #70
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Ok great. Appreciate the detailed notes.

    Some more testing looks on the cards tomorrow - will report back.

    Provided the house is still standing.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andyg View Post
    A wrap is an excellent way, cheap, effective and easy to change. One alternative could be to get/hire a spray gun and use that, or you could use a gloss roller to avoid brush marks, but make sure you prepare the surface well with a good primer. At the end of the day it depends on the finish you are looking for. New doors will cost you, plus you then need to get them fitted.
    Or - totally alternative- you go down another route: a friend of my wife (single mum with two kids with the experience of owning a 'boutique hotel') bought an apartment with a worn-down kitchen. She took all out and replaced it with second-hand s/steel professional material: worktops and integrated sink + freestanding hob. A few years later, when she had more money, she replaced it with a 'normal' kitchen, selling on the professional equipment for the same price that she'd paid a few years earlier!

  22. #72
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    Clean down with a light scouring pad to remove any gease.

    Prime with this, it bonds to anything https://www.screwfix.com/p/zinsser-b...ler-1ltr/29661

    2 coats of good quality ( not from B+Q) eggshell, oil based or acrylic. I tend to use acrylic paint now as it's far better than it used to be

    Apply primer and eggshell with these https://www.amazon.co.uk/Density-Rol.../dp/B00J8PRUJC
    Don't use the crappy white foam rollers, they won;t give a good enough finish

    Most eggshells will be a tough enough finish or you could finish with a water based varnish

    Take your time and as soon as it starts going tits up put everything away and start again tomorrow, you'll do fine

  23. #73
    How old is the house? Depending on the age it may have some interesting forms of asbestos used in its construction. Worth doing some basic checks.

    I don't know if you are anywhere near Dorset, probably London going by your "location", but I have a normal mains powered SDS drill with hammer only you can borrow for the duration if you like. I bought it for a contract many years ago and isn't needed today.

  24. #74
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thieuster View Post
    Or - totally alternative- you go down another route: a friend of my wife (single mum with two kids with the experience of owning a 'boutique hotel') bought an apartment with a worn-down kitchen. She took all out and replaced it with second-hand s/steel professional material: worktops and integrated sink + freestanding hob. A few years later, when she had more money, she replaced it with a 'normal' kitchen, selling on the professional equipment for the same price that she'd paid a few years earlier!
    Intelligent and cunning. I like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by mickylall View Post
    Clean down with a light scouring pad to remove any gease.

    Prime with this, it bonds to anything https://www.screwfix.com/p/zinsser-b...ler-1ltr/29661

    2 coats of good quality ( not from B+Q) eggshell, oil based or acrylic. I tend to use acrylic paint now as it's far better than it used to be

    Apply primer and eggshell with these https://www.amazon.co.uk/Density-Rol.../dp/B00J8PRUJC
    Don't use the crappy white foam rollers, they won;t give a good enough finish

    Most eggshells will be a tough enough finish or you could finish with a water based varnish

    Take your time and as soon as it starts going tits up put everything away and start again tomorrow, you'll do fine
    Thanks M. Good tip. Especially the last sentence. My swearing vocabulary has improved. A lot.

    Quote Originally Posted by catch21 View Post
    How old is the house? Depending on the age it may have some interesting forms of asbestos used in its construction. Worth doing some basic checks.

    I don't know if you are anywhere near Dorset, probably London going by your "location", but I have a normal mains powered SDS drill with hammer only you can borrow for the duration if you like. I bought it for a contract many years ago and isn't needed today.
    Actually not that old. 90s. Poor condition though. Hence it was relatively well-priced.

    Re: drill, I have a good friend who lives in Litton Cheney. I am supposed to be meeting him at some point but not until well-after this episode of DIY foolishness! Appreciate the offer though.

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