closing tag is in template navbar
Time Factors Watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Results 1 to 50 of 74

Thread: DIY 101

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033

    DIY 101

    As you may have guessed from my posts over the years, my DIY skills are fairly mediocre. My knowledge is so bad that in some cases, I'm reluctant to ask.

    Obviously, there's Google. And the very helpful people in various stores who get paid to put up with inane questions.

    But in some cases, advice differs and it's not always clear which is the best solution.

    I'm hoping that this thread may be helpful for others who are similarly ignorant, so I'll kick off with this:

    1. I've just moved and the house needs new flooring. In the kitchen, there are ceramic tiles. The flooring specialist nearby has said he can fit a new floor and remove the tiles, but he also said tile removal is an easy job so I'm tempted to give it a go when I have an hour or two to spare.

    Presumably, chisel, hammer and some elbow grease are all that's needed? Then I guess I should paint the skirting boards before the new floor is put in. Toying with underfloor heating but it seems a little unnecessary.

    2. I think the previous owner had a dog as there is a distinct smell in the carpets upstairs. As a precaution, I've set off smoke bombs (not the ones you used to make in the chemistry lab when you should have been revising, these are designed to kill any bugs), I've had the carpets deep cleaned professionally and I've washed the walls with disinfectant but there is still a whiff. I'm hoping it's not me.

    Assuming it's not me, the carpet specialist thinks that changing the carpet and the underlay should do the trick. Just wondering if there is anything else I can do to remove the smell. Apart from moving again.

    TIA

  2. #2
    Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Petersfield, Hampshire
    Posts
    5,903
    1) Yes I did this a year ago with about 30 sq. m of tiles, took me about 2-3 hours. You need a club hammer and a good wide bolster 50 - 75mm and a narrow cold chisel for any fiddly bits. Toolstation are cheap for this stuff. Eye protection essential, ear protection a very good idea and you may want to wear a mask. Get the bolster at a shallow enough angle and most should lift with ease. Your floorer will proably put down leveling solution to cover the mess of tile adhesive which will remain but try to get rid of the worst of it with the hammer and chisel.

    2) A second clean may get the last of it out, wait until the carpets are thoroughly dry before passing judgement. Or:


  3. #3
    Master reggie747's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    The Mersey Riviera
    Posts
    5,540
    Chisel, hammer and some elbow grease and EYE PROTECTION as is mentioned above.
    Either manually or hire a small jack hammer for the day and leave the elbow grease in the tin.....

  4. #4
    Hire a Kango from a local tool hire place to get the tiles up, it will make light work of it and be far more fun, as has been said wear eye protection

    I'd just replace the carpets and underlay as that should definitely cure it and you'll also then have lovely new carpet that will look and smell great.

  5. #5
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ashford, Kent
    Posts
    22,568
    Quote Originally Posted by Vanguard View Post
    Hire a Kango from a local tool hire place to get the tiles up, it will make light work of it and be far more fun, as has been said wear eye protection

    I'd just replace the carpets and underlay as that should definitely cure it and you'll also then have lovely new carpet that will look and smell great.
    This, both points.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  6. #6
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy67 View Post
    1) Yes I did this a year ago with about 30 sq. m of tiles, took me about 2-3 hours. You need a club hammer and a good wide bolster 50 - 75mm and a narrow cold chisel for any fiddly bits. Toolstation are cheap for this stuff. Eye protection essential, ear protection a very good idea and you may want to wear a mask. Get the bolster at a shallow enough angle and most should lift with ease. Your floorer will proably put down leveling solution to cover the mess of tile adhesive which will remain but try to get rid of the worst of it with the hammer and chisel.

    2) A second clean may get the last of it out, wait until the carpets are thoroughly dry before passing judgement. Or:

    Thank you. Appreciate the detail.

    Love the vid.
    Quote Originally Posted by reggie747 View Post
    Chisel, hammer and some elbow grease and EYE PROTECTION as is mentioned above.
    Either manually or hire a small jack hammer for the day and leave the elbow grease in the tin.....
    *nods*

    Understood.
    Quote Originally Posted by Vanguard View Post
    Hire a Kango from a local tool hire place to get the tiles up, it will make light work of it and be far more fun, as has been said wear eye protection

    I'd just replace the carpets and underlay as that should definitely cure it and you'll also then have lovely new carpet that will look and smell great.
    I'm up for some fun - sounds like a good idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Nuttington View Post
    And don't forget robust hand protection too. An ex-colleague very nearly sliced a finger clean off removing tiles when a razor-sharp shard decided to bite back.

    The docs managed to save the finger but it was never quite the same again and it took him months to get back to work.
    Thanks, I'll get some sturdy kit.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    This, both points.
    That's a decision then.

  7. #7
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    In them there mountainous Hills of Surrey
    Posts
    328
    And don't forget robust hand protection too. An ex-colleague very nearly sliced a finger clean off removing tiles when a razor-sharp shard decided to bite back.

    The docs managed to save the finger but it was never quite the same again and it took him months to get back to work.

  8. #8
    If you buy an SDS drill make sure it can operate in hammer-only mode.

  9. #9
    I take the opposite view. If I have the time I’d prefer to take a day and save few hours of professionals prices.

    In this case it’s only really labouring so not difficult.

  10. #10
    As above buy an SDS drill, you can usually find a deal with a few useful bits included. Really useful tool once you have one as makes light work of lots of jobs! If drilling make sure you have a good grip with both hands, as most don’t have a clutch (don’t ask how I know this, but the black eye lasted a while...)

    Also as above glasses, gloves and ear protection essential.

    Satisfying job to DIY

  11. #11
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    ^I'll get myself some hazmat gear and an NBC suit.

  12. #12
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    UP North.
    Posts
    11,280
    The floor tiles I assume will be going straight in the bin,and if so hardly anything you really need to think about in terms of DIY skills here,rip them up and throw away.

    Removed my kitchen tiles in an hour or so,cleaned up and fitted the wood floor over the next few days.
    Last edited by P9CLY; 9th January 2020 at 13:21.


  13. #13
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    ^Yes, the tiles are an acquired taste*. They'll be going in the bin.


    *Unless the 70s porn set look floats your boat.

  14. #14
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    UP North.
    Posts
    11,280
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    ^Yes, the tiles are an acquired taste*. They'll be going in the bin.


    *Unless the 70s porn set look floats your boat.
    I wouldn't invest heavily into anything otherthan an hammer and chisel first.They may just pop up very very easy,if not then decide what else may be needed,you will soon know what is required after the first few tiles.


  15. #15
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ashford, Kent
    Posts
    22,568
    Lol. I think I have witnessed this before. Could have been in a mirror.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  16. #16
    me too

    "it will be easy they'll come off in once piece"

    tiles chips away into thousand of piece. Leaving a bumpy surface behind which needs to then be levelled.


    I'd pay the the bloke to remove them. Then he can't moan at you about the state of the surface you leave him.

  17. #17
    Just about right. Step 2a is make a brew and wonder around looking business like as you contemplate your manliness.

  18. #18
    Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Mountsorrel uk
    Posts
    1,150
    Get a sds drill and a special angled tile removal chisle attachment, used one to do bathroom tiles the angled bit takes the tiles off without digging holes in the floor

  19. #19
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Lol. I think I have witnessed this before. Could have been in a mirror.
    Quote Originally Posted by eagletower View Post
    me too

    "it will be easy they'll come off in once piece"

    tiles chips away into thousand of piece. Leaving a bumpy surface behind which needs to then be levelled.

    I'd pay the the bloke to remove them. Then he can't moan at you about the state of the surface you leave him.
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt8500 View Post
    Just about right. Step 2a is make a brew and wonder around looking business like as you contemplate your manliness.
    I can see I'm not alone in the DIY wilderness.

    Quote Originally Posted by ralphy View Post
    I've been using Lidl's 'Parkside' range of electrical tools for many a year now and highly recommend them. £ for £ they'll cost you less than A.N.Other manufacturers and they come with a 3-year guarantee.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brand-New....c100010.m2109

    R
    Thanks. There are a few items I'll need to buy so your link will be very useful.

    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    I'd guess those saying "get someone in" to do it!,also aren't into DIY.The job you've asked about really isn't difficult by any stretch of MY imagination........really it isn't.
    The tiles will come up easy or not so easy,the not so easy ain't hard either.And when removed you just chisel the remaining adhesive away.And what I will say is,you will feel a lot better in that you've tackled a job you were going to pay someone else to do........what you CAN do too.

    So you hit your hand with the hammer maybe!,I worked on a quarry getting stone out of the cold hard ground in winter!,and then went on to dress same.

    I hit my hand many times,it hurts,you keep going.......I still have a tiny piece of the nicker (chisel) that sheers of the nicker as it curls over as the lump hammer hits it!!.
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael 38 View Post
    Get a sds drill and a special angled tile removal chisle attachment, used one to do bathroom tiles the angled bit takes the tiles off without digging holes in the floor
    Thanks both. I am going to give it a go.*

















    *Unless the quote comes in under the price of a G10.

  20. #20
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ashford, Kent
    Posts
    22,568
    An added issue, which will hit you after you’ve started: rubbles.
    It makes a mess, and depending on the area there could be a lot of it.
    If you’re getting a lot of things done, hiring a small skip may be useful. If not, rubbles bags (don’t overload them, they get really heavy).
    If you have curtains in the new house that you will throw away, dampen them and cover as much as you can, you’ll create a lot of dust and the curtains will catch a lot of it.

    Get rid of the rubbles bag by bag, it allows you to see your progress and keep a clear work plan.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  21. #21
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    ^Hadn't thought of that SJ. A skip - although expensive - makes sense as I will have whiffy carpets to bin as well.*

    *Unless I stick them on SC with the following description:
    Dog-friendly carpets for sale
    Luxury carpets for the discerning buyer. Lovely colour and only mildly stained. No low ballers.

  22. #22
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    UP North.
    Posts
    11,280
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    ^Hadn't thought of that SJ. A skip - although expensive - makes sense as I will have whiffy carpets to bin as well.*

    *Unless I stick them on SC with the following description:
    Dog-friendly carpets for sale
    Luxury carpets for the discerning buyer. Lovely colour and only mildly stained. No low ballers.
    Local tip will accept all you've mentioned,you load the car or whatever,you unload car,or alternative you pay for a skip and also fill the skip.

    Skips are great for much bigger jobs etc,anything that will go into your car is the better option,assuming your "average" family vehicle and not a Bugatti veyron.Ive always done it that way and a quick vac after if needed,but never did because I was careful.........my car,a Qasqui.


  23. #23
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    I've a Testarossa for visits to the tip - anything bigger and I get my batman to do it in the Bentley 4.5 litre.

    (Thanks P9CLY, a skip shall be ordered as I'm only running a hatchback at present.)

  24. #24
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    UP North.
    Posts
    11,280
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    I've a Testarossa for visits to the tip - anything bigger and I get my batman to do it in the Bentley 4.5 litre.

    (Thanks P9CLY, a skip shall be ordered as I'm only running a hatchback at present.)
    Technically the "hatchback" is a skip on wheels.........lol.


  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    Local tip will accept all you've mentioned,you load the car or whatever,you unload car,or alternative you pay for a skip and also fill the skip.
    Not all 'recycle centres' aka tips will accept DIY materials for free, ours certainly don't: they charge.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  26. #26
    Grand Master Chris_in_the_UK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Norf Yorks
    Posts
    37,962
    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    Local tip will accept all you've mentioned,you load the car or whatever,you unload car,or alternative you pay for a skip and also fill the skip.

    Skips are great for much bigger jobs etc,anything that will go into your car is the better option,assuming your "average" family vehicle and not a Bugatti veyron.Ive always done it that way and a quick vac after if needed,but never did because I was careful.........my car,a Qasqui.
    Ours now charges for ‘building materials’ by weight.

    Cheap enough if you have a few sacks in the boot, any more than that then a mini-skip might be better and less hassle.
    When you look long into an abyss, the abyss looks long into you.........

  27. #27
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    swansea uk
    Posts
    1,693
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_in_the_UK View Post
    Ours now charges for ‘building materials’ by weight.

    Cheap enough if you have a few sacks in the boot, any more than that then a mini-skip might be better and less hassle.
    Its free where I live still. Otherwise people fly-tip it all over the place and leave the area in a right state.

    It is wrong that they make you pay, in my opinion it should be free for all UK wide

  28. #28
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ashford, Kent
    Posts
    22,568
    ^^
    This really depends on the type of support they were laid on and the adhesive used. It can be very easy, when every tile you lift starts lifting the ones around it. It can also be a bastard where you chisel every bit of the tile off the support.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  29. #29
    Master mickylall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Burnley,Lancs
    Posts
    2,722
    Blog Entries
    1
    A tiled floor laid by a professional using the correct adhesive should be a massive bastard of a job, I've smashed dozens up and you can always tell the ones that have been done by a pro. Don't underestimate it just because a few people got lucky with theirs. Out of interest why are you painting the skirts before laying a new floor? Aren't you fitting new ones once the tiles are down?

  30. #30
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    Quote Originally Posted by mickylall View Post
    Out of interest why are you painting the skirts before laying a new floor? Aren't you fitting new ones once the tiles are down?
    *tries to appear knowledgeable, fails*

    Historically, I haven't been great at removing skirts.

    *waits for incoming joke*

    Should I remove the skirting at the same time as removing the tiles then?

  31. #31
    Master mickylall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Burnley,Lancs
    Posts
    2,722
    Blog Entries
    1
    Definitely, if they come off ok you can re-use them just sit them on top of the finished tiles and it will look a far better job

  32. #32
    Grand Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Trinovantum
    Posts
    10,033
    ^Thanks.

  33. #33
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    24,435
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    *tries to appear knowledgeable, fails*

    Historically, I haven't been great at removing skirts.

    *waits for incoming joke*

    Should I remove the skirting at the same time as removing the tiles then?

    If the tiles are under the skirting then you might not have a choice. If not then I would leave in-situ, put down the new floor and mask, sand and apply whatever finish you want.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  34. #34
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    13,453
    So, removing skirting boards ... where the top of the board meets the wall, run a stanley knife along the join to cut through the paint - it'll save a lot of mess.


    Now, back to the tiles. Here is the experience of Canadian YouTuber AvE, who as you may know is a pretty handy fellow (contains some ripe language)


  35. #35
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    UP North.
    Posts
    11,280
    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    ^^
    This really depends on the type of support they were laid on and the adhesive used. It can be very easy, when every tile you lift starts lifting the ones around it. It can also be a bastard where you chisel every bit of the tile off the support.
    100% agree it can be a bastard,but remember,If you as a "Man" thinks it beyond you!,it will only be another "Man" you will be paying to do what you can do too.

    That was always my point.

    Id be the first to leave the country on my private jet if major building work was needed at my mansion,but I'm an average Joe who doesn't mind doing a little DIY,and it can save a huge amount of money by doing it.

    Just a thought,I'm 60 and always did and have put my hand to most jobs around the house,I'd guess many in their 30's and certainly many much younger could even tackle a light bulb or change a plug!!.Id guess a fair few "professional" people are pretty much useless in the DIY dept,but very good at the profession they have chosen,and I know many that fit into that description because I've done some very low level DIY for Freinds,eg putting shelves up,and wall papering!!.

    I didn't say ALL Professional People mind!.I speak from experience of some I know,and IMO.

    And having said all the above,I'm happy it keeps the wheels of employment turning for others doing work that some won't at least try.
    Last edited by P9CLY; 10th January 2020 at 16:14.


  36. #36
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ashford, Kent
    Posts
    22,568
    If the units are good enough just buy new doors. Much better than an amateur paint job.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Do Not Sell My Personal Information