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Thread: DIY 101

  1. #1
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    DIY 101

    As you may have guessed from my posts over the years, my DIY skills are fairly mediocre. My knowledge is so bad that in some cases, I'm reluctant to ask.

    Obviously, there's Google. And the very helpful people in various stores who get paid to put up with inane questions.

    But in some cases, advice differs and it's not always clear which is the best solution.

    I'm hoping that this thread may be helpful for others who are similarly ignorant, so I'll kick off with this:

    1. I've just moved and the house needs new flooring. In the kitchen, there are ceramic tiles. The flooring specialist nearby has said he can fit a new floor and remove the tiles, but he also said tile removal is an easy job so I'm tempted to give it a go when I have an hour or two to spare.

    Presumably, chisel, hammer and some elbow grease are all that's needed? Then I guess I should paint the skirting boards before the new floor is put in. Toying with underfloor heating but it seems a little unnecessary.

    2. I think the previous owner had a dog as there is a distinct smell in the carpets upstairs. As a precaution, I've set off smoke bombs (not the ones you used to make in the chemistry lab when you should have been revising, these are designed to kill any bugs), I've had the carpets deep cleaned professionally and I've washed the walls with disinfectant but there is still a whiff. I'm hoping it's not me.

    Assuming it's not me, the carpet specialist thinks that changing the carpet and the underlay should do the trick. Just wondering if there is anything else I can do to remove the smell. Apart from moving again.

    TIA

  2. #2
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    1) Yes I did this a year ago with about 30 sq. m of tiles, took me about 2-3 hours. You need a club hammer and a good wide bolster 50 - 75mm and a narrow cold chisel for any fiddly bits. Toolstation are cheap for this stuff. Eye protection essential, ear protection a very good idea and you may want to wear a mask. Get the bolster at a shallow enough angle and most should lift with ease. Your floorer will proably put down leveling solution to cover the mess of tile adhesive which will remain but try to get rid of the worst of it with the hammer and chisel.

    2) A second clean may get the last of it out, wait until the carpets are thoroughly dry before passing judgement. Or:


  3. #3
    Master reggie747's Avatar
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    Chisel, hammer and some elbow grease and EYE PROTECTION as is mentioned above.
    Either manually or hire a small jack hammer for the day and leave the elbow grease in the tin.....

  4. #4
    Hire a Kango from a local tool hire place to get the tiles up, it will make light work of it and be far more fun, as has been said wear eye protection

    I'd just replace the carpets and underlay as that should definitely cure it and you'll also then have lovely new carpet that will look and smell great.

  5. #5
    Craftsman
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    And don't forget robust hand protection too. An ex-colleague very nearly sliced a finger clean off removing tiles when a razor-sharp shard decided to bite back.

    The docs managed to save the finger but it was never quite the same again and it took him months to get back to work.

  6. #6
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanguard View Post
    Hire a Kango from a local tool hire place to get the tiles up, it will make light work of it and be far more fun, as has been said wear eye protection

    I'd just replace the carpets and underlay as that should definitely cure it and you'll also then have lovely new carpet that will look and smell great.
    This, both points.
    Don't take my silence for agreement. I've just realised you're too stupid to argue with.

  7. #7
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy67 View Post
    1) Yes I did this a year ago with about 30 sq. m of tiles, took me about 2-3 hours. You need a club hammer and a good wide bolster 50 - 75mm and a narrow cold chisel for any fiddly bits. Toolstation are cheap for this stuff. Eye protection essential, ear protection a very good idea and you may want to wear a mask. Get the bolster at a shallow enough angle and most should lift with ease. Your floorer will proably put down leveling solution to cover the mess of tile adhesive which will remain but try to get rid of the worst of it with the hammer and chisel.

    2) A second clean may get the last of it out, wait until the carpets are thoroughly dry before passing judgement. Or:

    Thank you. Appreciate the detail.

    Love the vid.
    Quote Originally Posted by reggie747 View Post
    Chisel, hammer and some elbow grease and EYE PROTECTION as is mentioned above.
    Either manually or hire a small jack hammer for the day and leave the elbow grease in the tin.....
    *nods*

    Understood.
    Quote Originally Posted by Vanguard View Post
    Hire a Kango from a local tool hire place to get the tiles up, it will make light work of it and be far more fun, as has been said wear eye protection

    I'd just replace the carpets and underlay as that should definitely cure it and you'll also then have lovely new carpet that will look and smell great.
    I'm up for some fun - sounds like a good idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Nuttington View Post
    And don't forget robust hand protection too. An ex-colleague very nearly sliced a finger clean off removing tiles when a razor-sharp shard decided to bite back.

    The docs managed to save the finger but it was never quite the same again and it took him months to get back to work.
    Thanks, I'll get some sturdy kit.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    This, both points.
    That's a decision then.

  8. #8
    Master Paneraiseeker's Avatar
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    A kango is a little OTT a half-decent hammer drill with bolster will have that up in no time.

  9. #9
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paneraiseeker View Post
    A kango is a little OTT a half-decent hammer drill with bolster will have that up in no time.
    Agreed especially as we have no idea what the tiles are, how they are fixed and the sub straight they are fixed to.

    Personally i would get a bloster chisel and a lump hammer and try to remove just one. If it's really difficult then get the bloke to do it. Do not take a Kango to it because you might end up damaging the floor under the tiles. Hopefully the tiles are fixed with normal tile adhesive so should come up nice and easy.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Paneraiseeker View Post
    A kango is a little OTT a half-decent hammer drill with bolster will have that up in no time.
    I was just about to post the same advice!

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  11. #11
    How much is he charging to remove the tiles?

  12. #12
    Master reggie747's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paneraiseeker View Post
    A kango is a little OTT a half-decent hammer drill with bolster will have that up in no time.
    I think "Kango" is used loosely here. A bit like Hoover when talking about any vacuum cleaner.

    To give it it's full title, hire a small demolition hammer

  13. #13
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paneraiseeker View Post
    A kango is a little OTT a half-decent hammer drill with bolster will have that up in no time.
    Yes, an electric tile stripper/remover adapted to the area you need to strip. Having the right tool makes an amazing difference when DIYing. Don't buy anything but the most basic tools until you're more proficient. Hiring is easy, reasonably cheap and they can both advise you and show you how it works.
    Don't take my silence for agreement. I've just realised you're too stupid to argue with.

  14. #14
    Regarding the smell, if you do go down the route of new carpet & underlay Iíd recommend removing the old stuff first and then seeing if the floor below (Iím assuming itís wood) still smells after a couple of days of the room being aired. If so, then a coating of PVA over the floor should seal it and prevent any further smell.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  15. #15
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eagletower View Post
    How much is he charging to remove the tiles?
    I should receive the quote in a day or two but I'm already well over budget in every area so anything I can do will help.

    Quote Originally Posted by ralphy View Post
    Regarding the smell, if you do go down the route of new carpet & underlay Iíd recommend removing the old stuff first and then seeing if the floor below (Iím assuming itís wood) still smells after a couple of days of the room being aired. If so, then a coating of PVA over the floor should seal it and prevent any further smell.

    R
    Thanks R, good shout.

  16. #16
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
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    For the OP, when people said "hammer drill", they really meant "SDS drill" in hammer only mode. I'd also point out that depending on what tile cement has been used, doing it with a club hammer and bolster could be bloody hard work.

    More words on SDS drills: https://www.nationaltoolhireshops.co...-an-sds-drill/

  17. #17
    Hire a small breaker to remove the tiles? Not sure what stage this is in the food chain between an SDS still and a Kangoo???

    Regards the smell, definitely change the carpet and underlay.

  18. #18
    Master thieuster's Avatar
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    Don't be tempted to rent the biggest behomoth, drill-wise. Your arms will fall off within an hour or so (I've been there). Go to a tool-hire shop with experienced people behind the counter for experienced advise. Furthermore: what Jeremy67 already said. Take your time to get rid of the what's left of the cement etc. A thorough job will save you a lot of work later on. Ask the guys at a tile shop what you need to apply on top of the floor after you've taken out all the tiles.

    On the other hand: I once extended a kitchen and we wanted a new floor in the old and new part, leaving the existing tiles in place. I had to put on an emulsion, thick as milk, to level on floor. That took 24hrs to dry. Weird stuff: after 23 hrs nothing had happened and in the last hour it became solid as a rock and the floor was completely level.

  19. #19
    A Parkside SDS Hammer Drill can be bought for between £40 and £70 and that'll not only do the job but also any other DIY needs for years to come.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  20. #20
    Master
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    Buy an SDS drill (useful to have one anyway) and one of these.

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/armeg-sds...-x-180mm/89391

  21. #21
    If you buy an SDS drill make sure it can operate in hammer-only mode.

  22. #22
    Grand Master TheFlyingBanana's Avatar
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    Broadly speaking, I take the attitude that if you want a professional job done, get a professional to do it. If the job is going to take you a day, it will take a pro with experience and all the right kit an hour or two.

    I'd pay the extra and remove the hassle from your life.

    With regard to the carpet, a few cleans should do the trick. Oh, and the Shake n' Vac - but be warned, it only works if you do the dance.
    So clever my foot fell off.

  23. #23
    I take the opposite view. If I have the time Iíd prefer to take a day and save few hours of professionals prices.

    In this case itís only really labouring so not difficult.

  24. #24
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    I neglected to mention that while I'm not very good at DIY, it's just because I haven't really had the opportunity / interest until now. I am quite practical and I tend to spend a lot of time outdoors or in the mountains (if I can find any).

    As a result, I love kit. I have boxes of it - anything needed for a long trek across the Brecon Beacons really.

    Soooo... any excuse to get a drill is probably going to find me researching which one, and buying something I don't really need. Sounds like in this case it might be worth it though.

    TFB, I will ask my son to video me doing the dance. Can't promise I will post the results as it might scupper my chances if I ever want to run for office.

  25. #25
    As above buy an SDS drill, you can usually find a deal with a few useful bits included. Really useful tool once you have one as makes light work of lots of jobs! If drilling make sure you have a good grip with both hands, as most donít have a clutch (donít ask how I know this, but the black eye lasted a while...)

    Also as above glasses, gloves and ear protection essential.

    Satisfying job to DIY

  26. #26
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    ^I'll get myself some hazmat gear and an NBC suit.

  27. #27
    Grand Master
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    The floor tiles I assume will be going straight in the bin,and if so hardly anything you really need to think about in terms of DIY skills here,rip them up and throw away.

    Removed my kitchen tiles in an hour or so,cleaned up and fitted the wood floor over the next few days.
    Last edited by P9CLY; 9th January 2020 at 13:21.


  28. #28
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    ^Yes, the tiles are an acquired taste*. They'll be going in the bin.


    *Unless the 70s porn set look floats your boat.

  29. #29
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    ^Yes, the tiles are an acquired taste*. They'll be going in the bin.


    *Unless the 70s porn set look floats your boat.
    I wouldn't invest heavily into anything otherthan an hammer and chisel first.They may just pop up very very easy,if not then decide what else may be needed,you will soon know what is required after the first few tiles.


  30. #30
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Ok. Have I got this right?

    Step 1
    Pose in kitchen wearing new gear. Adopt business-like expression. Turn on Talk Radio.

    Step 2
    Take off Stetson and leather chaps and begin removing tiles.

    Step 3
    Bandage bloody hand and forehead, then put on safety gear.

    Step 4
    Spend day swearing then call in professional.

  31. #31
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Lol. I think I have witnessed this before. Could have been in a mirror.
    Don't take my silence for agreement. I've just realised you're too stupid to argue with.

  32. #32
    me too

    "it will be easy they'll come off in once piece"

    tiles chips away into thousand of piece. Leaving a bumpy surface behind which needs to then be levelled.


    I'd pay the the bloke to remove them. Then he can't moan at you about the state of the surface you leave him.

  33. #33
    Just about right. Step 2a is make a brew and wonder around looking business like as you contemplate your manliness.

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    Soooo... any excuse to get a drill is probably going to find me researching which one, and buying something I don't really need. Sounds like in this case it might be worth it though.
    I've been using Lidl's 'Parkside' range of electrical tools for many a year now and highly recommend them. £ for £ they'll cost you less than A.N.Other manufacturers and they come with a 3-year guarantee.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brand-New....c100010.m2109

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  35. #35
    Grand Master
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    I'd guess those saying "get someone in" to do it!,also aren't into DIY.The job you've asked about really isn't difficult by any stretch of MY imagination........really it isn't.
    The tiles will come up easy or not so easy,the not so easy ain't hard either.And when removed you just chisel the remaining adhesive away.And what I will say is,you will feel a lot better in that you've tackled a job you were going to pay someone else to do........what you CAN do too.

    So you hit your hand with the hammer maybe!,I worked on a quarry getting stone out of the cold hard ground in winter!,and then went on to dress same.

    I hit my hand many times,it hurts,you keep going.......I still have a tiny piece of the nicker (chisel) that sheers of the nicker as it curls over as the lump hammer hits it!!.


  36. #36
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    Get a sds drill and a special angled tile removal chisle attachment, used one to do bathroom tiles the angled bit takes the tiles off without digging holes in the floor

  37. #37
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Lol. I think I have witnessed this before. Could have been in a mirror.
    Quote Originally Posted by eagletower View Post
    me too

    "it will be easy they'll come off in once piece"

    tiles chips away into thousand of piece. Leaving a bumpy surface behind which needs to then be levelled.

    I'd pay the the bloke to remove them. Then he can't moan at you about the state of the surface you leave him.
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt8500 View Post
    Just about right. Step 2a is make a brew and wonder around looking business like as you contemplate your manliness.
    I can see I'm not alone in the DIY wilderness.

    Quote Originally Posted by ralphy View Post
    I've been using Lidl's 'Parkside' range of electrical tools for many a year now and highly recommend them. £ for £ they'll cost you less than A.N.Other manufacturers and they come with a 3-year guarantee.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brand-New....c100010.m2109

    R
    Thanks. There are a few items I'll need to buy so your link will be very useful.

    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    I'd guess those saying "get someone in" to do it!,also aren't into DIY.The job you've asked about really isn't difficult by any stretch of MY imagination........really it isn't.
    The tiles will come up easy or not so easy,the not so easy ain't hard either.And when removed you just chisel the remaining adhesive away.And what I will say is,you will feel a lot better in that you've tackled a job you were going to pay someone else to do........what you CAN do too.

    So you hit your hand with the hammer maybe!,I worked on a quarry getting stone out of the cold hard ground in winter!,and then went on to dress same.

    I hit my hand many times,it hurts,you keep going.......I still have a tiny piece of the nicker (chisel) that sheers of the nicker as it curls over as the lump hammer hits it!!.
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael 38 View Post
    Get a sds drill and a special angled tile removal chisle attachment, used one to do bathroom tiles the angled bit takes the tiles off without digging holes in the floor
    Thanks both. I am going to give it a go.*

















    *Unless the quote comes in under the price of a G10.

  38. #38
    Master reggie747's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    Ok. Have I got this right?

    Step 1
    Pose in kitchen wearing new gear. Adopt business-like expression. Turn on Talk Radio.

    Step 2
    Take off Stetson and leather chaps and begin removing tiles.

    Step 3
    Bandage bloody hand and forehead, then put on safety gear.

    Step 4
    Spend day swearing then call in professional.
    Not quite, you forgot the bit that says "Put the kettle on and give it a few coats of looking at first" !

    (Mentioned above I now see)

  39. #39
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    An added issue, which will hit you after youíve started: rubbles.
    It makes a mess, and depending on the area there could be a lot of it.
    If youíre getting a lot of things done, hiring a small skip may be useful. If not, rubbles bags (donít overload them, they get really heavy).
    If you have curtains in the new house that you will throw away, dampen them and cover as much as you can, youíll create a lot of dust and the curtains will catch a lot of it.

    Get rid of the rubbles bag by bag, it allows you to see your progress and keep a clear work plan.
    Don't take my silence for agreement. I've just realised you're too stupid to argue with.

  40. #40
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    ^Hadn't thought of that SJ. A skip - although expensive - makes sense as I will have whiffy carpets to bin as well.*

    *Unless I stick them on SC with the following description:
    Dog-friendly carpets for sale
    Luxury carpets for the discerning buyer. Lovely colour and only mildly stained. No low ballers.

  41. #41
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    ^Hadn't thought of that SJ. A skip - although expensive - makes sense as I will have whiffy carpets to bin as well.*

    *Unless I stick them on SC with the following description:
    Dog-friendly carpets for sale
    Luxury carpets for the discerning buyer. Lovely colour and only mildly stained. No low ballers.
    Local tip will accept all you've mentioned,you load the car or whatever,you unload car,or alternative you pay for a skip and also fill the skip.

    Skips are great for much bigger jobs etc,anything that will go into your car is the better option,assuming your "average" family vehicle and not a Bugatti veyron.Ive always done it that way and a quick vac after if needed,but never did because I was careful.........my car,a Qasqui.


  42. #42
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    I've a Testarossa for visits to the tip - anything bigger and I get my batman to do it in the Bentley 4.5 litre.

    (Thanks P9CLY, a skip shall be ordered as I'm only running a hatchback at present.)

  43. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    Local tip will accept all you've mentioned,you load the car or whatever,you unload car,or alternative you pay for a skip and also fill the skip.
    Not all 'recycle centres' aka tips will accept DIY materials for free, ours certainly don't: they charge.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  44. #44
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlphaOmega View Post
    I've a Testarossa for visits to the tip - anything bigger and I get my batman to do it in the Bentley 4.5 litre.

    (Thanks P9CLY, a skip shall be ordered as I'm only running a hatchback at present.)
    Technically the "hatchback" is a skip on wheels.........lol.


  45. #45
    Master AlphaOmega's Avatar
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    Correct.

  46. #46
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
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    There is of course an alternative to the tiled floor. Assuming its level, simply cover it with a 8mm ply (glued down) and then put down something like Amtico, etc down.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  47. #47
    Grand Master Chris_in_the_UK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by P9CLY View Post
    Local tip will accept all you've mentioned,you load the car or whatever,you unload car,or alternative you pay for a skip and also fill the skip.

    Skips are great for much bigger jobs etc,anything that will go into your car is the better option,assuming your "average" family vehicle and not a Bugatti veyron.Ive always done it that way and a quick vac after if needed,but never did because I was careful.........my car,a Qasqui.
    Ours now charges for Ďbuilding materialsí by weight.

    Cheap enough if you have a few sacks in the boot, any more than that then a mini-skip might be better and less hassle.
    When you look long into an abyss, the abyss looks long into you.........

  48. #48
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_in_the_UK View Post
    Ours now charges for Ďbuilding materialsí by weight.

    Cheap enough if you have a few sacks in the boot, any more than that then a mini-skip might be better and less hassle.
    Its free where I live still. Otherwise people fly-tip it all over the place and leave the area in a right state.

    It is wrong that they make you pay, in my opinion it should be free for all UK wide

  49. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by xellos99 View Post
    Its free where I live still. Otherwise people fly-tip it all over the place and leave the area in a right state.

    It is wrong that they make you pay, in my opinion it should be free for all UK wide
    Ours is free too but donít see why should be free UK wide. Itís for the local council to decide and budget for.

  50. #50
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Ours is free too but don’t see why should be free UK wide. It’s for the local council to decide and budget for.
    Its not really free is it,we all pay tax for this sort of service.Rather like going on an all inclusive holiday and saying the food and drinks are free!..........

    Its been paid for.

    Imo a council worker should see what is been thrown away that could be re-used,as the tv programme.I hate waste,it shouldn't be just discarded because your colour scheme changes!.
    Last edited by P9CLY; 10th January 2020 at 09:05.


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