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Thread: Next dog - sorted!

  1. #1
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    Next dog - sorted!

    We lost Elsa over a year ago and it feels like we are now ready for our next dog.

    Two questions we are pondering based on the fact that we rescued Elsa, a black lab, when she was 3 years old and we are thinking another lab would be a right for us.

    1 - Puppy or a 1-2 year old rescue? Considering mess, chewing, recall/train-ability, etc

    2 - Black or Fox Red lab? - Every black lab bitch I have met has been lovely, loyal and obedient (after training). Fox Reds look nice but are they any different?

    I know a dog should not be for Christmas but I am thinking the time with the family around for a couple weeks may be a good start for a new family member.

    We live in a house with two cats and a large garden on the edge of a quiet village.
    Last edited by Gurmot; 24th December 2019 at 12:26.

  2. #2
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    Please consider a rescue dog rather than lining the pockets of breeders. There are so many out there needing homes it's heart breaking.

  3. #3
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    If you check out Senior Staffy Club on Facebook (or just Google Senior Staffy Club) you will see some beautiful, gentle dogs that might just melt your heart.

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  4. #4
    Grand Master number2's Avatar
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    We lost our mutt Nipper early this year and it's still too painful to consider another but, like Nipper the next will inevitably be a 'rescue dog'.

    RIP Nip.
    "Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's enemy action."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by beechcustom View Post
    Please consider a rescue dog rather than lining the pockets of breeders. There are so many out there needing homes it's heart breaking.
    Plus 1 for the above.

    We rescued one after we lost our beautiful Belgian Shepherd girl.Then another when he turned six. Never looked back and would never "Buy" another dog again. So many deserving cases in the shelters and am sure you will find your next canine soul mate there.

    I wouldn't worry about the time of year TBH. You've made your mind up it's time for another so that's the best time.

    Find ya friend that you bond with, that in turn also bonds with you and yours. You'll look long and hard, then you will know!

    Good luck and all the best.

    Jon

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonRA View Post
    If you check out Senior Staffy Club on Facebook (or just Google Senior Staffy Club) you will see some beautiful, gentle dogs that might just melt your heart.

    Sent from my moto e5 play using Tapatalk
    I'm sure they will too, I cant look solely for that reason!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by beechcustom View Post
    Please consider a rescue dog rather than lining the pockets of breeders. There are so many out there needing homes it's heart breaking.
    We are, and our previous dogs have all been 2nd hand. We've never had a puppy and I am wondering if it's something we should experience, although SWMBO is already leaning towards a rescue.

  8. #8
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    I would recommend taking something else than a Lab. Not because there is anything wrong with this gorgeous breed but because your previous dog was one. It will be extremely difficult for everyone in the family to avoid comparing/confusing them, and its not fair on one of them.
    A completely different breed will set its own standard. As an example I took a terrier a couple of years after I lost my beloved shepherd. The dog is fabulous but in a very different way.
    Memento Mori

  9. #9
    I saw a photograph of rescue dogs that had been put down and lined up outside their cages, prior to removal for incineration. It was heartbreaking. If I were looking for a dog, a visit to a rescue would be top of my list. I wouldn't be thinking of what breed.

  10. #10
    Not that you appear to need any further persuasion Simon, but I'll add my support for having another rescue dog.

    We've been acting as fosterers for some time (as well as having had several rescue dogs of our own) and wouldn't now ever choose a non-rescued dog in preference.

    Good luck with your search for whatever route you go down.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  11. #11
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    Id lean towards a rescue. We where not allowed to rescue due to wife being pregnant, I kind of get their rules but it was frustrating to be told we couldnt adopt until the youngest child was 7.
    We bought another boxer after losing our first boxer George to cancer, hes been a fantastic dog almost 8 years old now but 8 weeks old in his head lol.
    As saint-just said there have been comparisons between the 2 nothing major but without my knowing Id built a picture in my mind of this one being the same just a different colour, theyre chalk and cheese I suppose its just like our kids are different . Henry is brilliant (currently trying to lie on top of the log burner) in his own way and I wouldnt change him for the world but once hes gone Ill be rescuing next time round because there are far too many dogs out there in need of a loving home. I love boxers but I wont be focused on breed etc more about the dog itself

  12. #12
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    Well it looks like I am outnumbered and we will start looking for a rescue. Let's see how good this new-fangled social media is then.....

  13. #13
    Good luck with your choice but TBH it's a pity that people feel they should take a rescued dog, the problem should be dealt with (though no idea how).

  14. #14
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    All the best with whatever you choose mate.

    Wonderful getting a new dog around the place.
    Cheers,
    Neil.

    My Speedmaster website:

    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  15. #15
    Master sean's Avatar
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    To those that have taken rescue dogs, have you experienced any behavioral problems or underlying medical issues with them that were undetected when you got them but developed later on? These are two arguments I hear against rescue dogs vs. breeder-bought.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil.C View Post
    All the best with whatever you choose mate.

    Wonderful getting a new dog around the place.
    Thanks Neil. Im actually quite excited and I know that once I get an idea in my head I tend to focus on it until it happens so I hope its not too long to wait. I also think it will be good for the whole family, for various reasons.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean View Post
    To those that have taken rescue dogs, have you experienced any behavioral problems or underlying medical issues with them that were undetected when you got them but developed later on? These are two arguments I hear against rescue dogs vs. breeder-bought.
    Our first dog was an 18 month old Collie x Terrier. Looked a meek sort of chap in the rescue centre but was a whirling dervish when we got him home. Took months of hard work and private lessons to straighten him out but he was a fantastic dog, with no health issues at all.

    The most recent was a rescue black lab bitch. Wonderful temperament and a pleasure to work with, easy to train and very obedient. Only health issues came late in life.

    Any dog can develop health issues so I am not overly concerned, although there is some stuff in the media at the moment about imported rescue dogs bringing disease into the UK.

  18. #18
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Hope you can rescue a dog in need. So many have had a bad start and I know it can mean a lot of art work, but we all need a second chance sometimes. If you think about a spaniel these people are very good, and assess the dogs very well.
    http://spanielaid.co.uk
    It's just democracy.

  19. #19
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    Best bet is a good old fashioned mongrel. They are nearly always healthier and more intelligent and easily bought from a resue centre.

  20. #20
    I owned my first dog for over nine years now. A German Shephard. We bought her as a puppy from a GSD breeder who happened to be the Chairman of the German shepherd society! A surprise from my wife as I had always wanted one and our circumstances finally allowed us to own a dog ( working from home etc)
    Anyway she is the love of my life.

    Im not sure if its the breed that gives off certain signals but in the nine years of ownership we have met hundreds of owners and dogs on walks and I have to say the majority of dogs that have attacked her have been rescued. The owners use it as an excuse. Sorry hes a rescue. Im sure there are many lovely well behaved rescue dogs out there but Ive never met one.
    Just my experience to share in your decision.

  21. #21
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    Our last two were rescue Airedales, the last Archie had some health issues but that’s not why he needed rehoming, we like to think we spent money on a good life for him were as maybe someone else might not have, daughters first dog was a rescue and she may be getting ready for another in the new year, if you go to breed rescue you can usually discover the reason for the need to to rehome.

    Ooh, a fox red lab, lovely.

  22. #22
    Master thieuster's Avatar
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    My wife's late and beloved bull terrier was a rescue dog. More or less a project of my wife's brother and herself. The dog was 2 yrs old when it came into the family. The sweetest dog you can imagine when in the house with family and friends. Absolutely murderous without a nozzle... It took my wife and her brother more than a year to get that straight. But still, when walking the dog, he was always wearing a nozzle.

    That dog must have had a really bad life before it landed in my wife's household. Picking up a newspaper just to put it in the basket caused severe stress! He ran off and tried to hide. Loud noises, with a bang (dropping something in the kitchen) caused pure panic. That hasn't stopped not even when he was older. So yes, certain dogs come with a 'past'. Nowadays, rescue shelters try to determine the dog's character etc and try to match the family with the dog.

    Slowly but surely, I'm turning to the point where my wife wants a dog again. It's going to be an older rescue dog. 8+ or so.

  23. #23
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurmot View Post
    We are, and our previous dogs have all been 2nd hand. We've never had a puppy and I am wondering if it's something we should experience, although SWMBO is already leaning towards a rescue.
    It cannot be overstated how much work puppies are. They make human babies seem easy.

  24. #24
    Craftsman smalleyboy1's Avatar
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    We got a rescue dog (possibly German pointer and Doberman cross)nearly 6 years ago and after about 10 days, he went ballistic when an elderly female friend visited. He started to growl and bare his teeth. My wife got him into the garden and then when I got home from work, I put him on a lead and took him back into the house where he instantly started to snarl at our visitor. He went back to the rescue centre the next day.

    We then bought an Italian Spinone pup who has been wonderful. Many dogs are abandoned through no fault of their own but some may be abandoned due to underlying temperament issues.

    I wish you well as a dog enriches your life so much.

  25. #25
    Master woodacre1983's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bootneck View Post
    Id lean towards a rescue. We where not allowed to rescue due to wife being pregnant, I kind of get their rules but it was frustrating to be told we couldnt adopt until the youngest child was 7.
    We bought another boxer after losing our first boxer George to cancer, hes been a fantastic dog almost 8 years old now but 8 weeks old in his head lol.
    As saint-just said there have been comparisons between the 2 nothing major but without my knowing Id built a picture in my mind of this one being the same just a different colour, theyre chalk and cheese I suppose its just like our kids are different . Henry is brilliant (currently trying to lie on top of the log burner) in his own way and I wouldnt change him for the world but once hes gone Ill be rescuing next time round because there are far too many dogs out there in need of a loving home. I love boxers but I wont be focused on breed etc more about the dog itself
    I know what you mean. Due to our experiences we will never look at rescue dogs again. We will always now go to a trusted breeder.

    We tried to adopt from many places and was flatly declined for many reasons.
    You have cats
    You have children
    You have young children
    You do not live in an area suitable for a spaniel!!!
    You have rabbits!

    The reason there are so many rescues homeless is they are trying to find the absolute perfect ideal home and ruling out many excellent dog owners who then go buy a puppy.


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  26. #26
    Master woodacre1983's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldoakknives View Post
    Hope you can rescue a dog in need. So many have had a bad start and I know it can mean a lot of art work, but we all need a second chance sometimes. If you think about a spaniel these people are very good, and assess the dogs very well.
    http://spanielaid.co.uk
    May be a great place. But instantly rules out many great dog owners.
    I have a child under 5.
    I have 2 days a week the house will be empty for 6 hours.

    Experienced spaniel owner ruled out..


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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodacre1983 View Post
    I know what you mean. Due to our experiences we will never look at rescue dogs again. We will always now go to a trusted breeder.

    We tried to adopt from many places and was flatly declined for many reasons.
    You have cats
    You have children
    You have young children
    You do not live in an area suitable for a spaniel!!!
    You have rabbits!

    The reason there are so many rescues homeless is they are trying to find the absolute perfect ideal home and ruling out many excellent dog owners who then go buy a puppy.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Drove us mad at the time wed found a cracking dog in the shelter mid sized mongrel, they came out to do a visit house and garden perfect asked about our past dog etc all great. We went a few days later to pay the money and arrange vaccinations micro chipping etc and wed just found out the wife was expecting stupidly we told them because we where both so happy, we might as well have told them we where setting up a dog fighting ring or something. I even asked whats stopping me going to buy a puppy now? a case of computer says no.

    still it meant we ended up with Henry who has been superb and now we have 3 kids who adore him and he them, he can often be found dressed as a bloody princess or superhero this dog has no self respect at all lol

  28. #28
    Master woodacre1983's Avatar
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    I know. Its madness no flexibility no thought just a tick means no chance.


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  29. #29
    Master
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    And we should have dogs with children under 7 really

    https://imgur.com/a/SJwKvF9

  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by bootneck View Post
    And we should have dogs with children under 7 really

    https://imgur.com/a/SJwKvF9
    No better brother/ sister for a young child than a loving dog.

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  31. #31
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    Flat Coated Retriever puppy. You could not make a better choice and getting as an 8 week old it will be moulded by you and your family. But then again I'm biased, we are on our 3rd.

  32. #32
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    We have one of each. A rescue called Clyde who is from Greece. Beautiful dog. Gentle and stunning looking. We get stopped at least a few times a week by people asking about him. He is a Munsterlander. Here is the thing though. He was very frightened when we got him, like most rescue dogs that have been through trauma. With love, consistency, boundaries and patience he blossomed. Like any living thing that has suffered trauma and abuse..... to bracket all rescue dogs in a certain way as earlier in the thread is a bit crackers really. This fella will soon be going into hospitals and hospices as he gives a lot of comfort to people and appears to know when people are ill and need some comfort. He makes people smile a lot. There is something about him. An old lady said to me recently he looks into your soul and I know exactly what she means. I have just today been diagnosed with a serious illness and he clearly knew a while ago. Treatment starts next week and he will be a big source of support.

    Now my other dog Oscar is a KC registered Springer Spaniel from very good working lines. Bought because we wanted a pup who we could train as a gun dog and to do agility and scent work. He is fantastic but a bit lively. I walk 7/8 miles a day with him usually, up until recently and he is just warming up. He even runs in his sleep lay on his back. Wouldnt swop him for the world even though he is as mad as a box of frogs and would swop anything and anyone apart from me for a ball....

    Whatever you decide will be the right choice for you and your family. If you do go down the breeder route just check them out first and ensure health testing has been done. If you want details of where we got Clyde from PM me. They were fab and gave as much background info on him as they had.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by woodacre1983 View Post
    May be a great place. But instantly rules out many great dog owners.
    I have a child under 5.
    I have 2 days a week the house will be empty for 6 hours.

    Experienced spaniel owner ruled out..
    Their dogs will have been assessed by the fosterer (4 weeks +) and a full report on the animal will have been given back to the charity. If they think it's better for the dog to be homed without children and not left alone for long periods then they will not consider applicants that do not fit the criteria.

    It's better that a dog goes to home where it will remain than having it rejected and returned back to them.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by bootneck View Post
    And we should have dogs with children under 7 really

    https://imgur.com/a/SJwKvF9
    Some dogs maybe, others not so.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  35. #35
    Master woodacre1983's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphy View Post
    Their dogs will have been assessed by the fosterer (4 weeks +) and a full report on the animal will have been given back to the charity. If they think it's better for the dog to be homed without children and not left alone for long periods then they will not consider applicants that do not fit the criteria.

    It's better that a dog goes to home where it will remain than having it rejected and returned back to them.

    R
    The problem is those two rules are blanket rules.
    So despite my house being empty for those hours my current dog I got as a puppy is looked after by caring relatives. The kids one is another common rule. Been told by many dog shelters its not individually assessed just a rule.


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  36. #36
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodacre1983 View Post
    I know what you mean. Due to our experiences we will never look at rescue dogs again. We will always now go to a trusted breeder.

    We tried to adopt from many places and was flatly declined for many reasons.
    You have cats
    You have children
    You have young children
    You do not live in an area suitable for a spaniel!!!
    You have rabbits!

    The reason there are so many rescues homeless is they are trying to find the absolute perfect ideal home and ruling out many excellent dog owners who then go buy a puppy.


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    Quote Originally Posted by woodacre1983 View Post
    May be a great place. But instantly rules out many great dog owners.
    I have a child under 5.
    I have 2 days a week the house will be empty for 6 hours.

    Experienced spaniel owner ruled out..


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    Yes I know they have rules that can sometimes sound silly or over sensitive. Please bear in mind that any mistakes on their part could easily end up being very detrimental to their work. Yes people who have dogs that live with cats, young children, small furry pets etc but can you imagine the headlines if a rescue dog harmed any of these? I have a spaniel at the moment, and before him had another spaniel who lived to 13. We're both retired now so have plenty of time for him, but when we got our previous spaniel we were both still working. Although our hours were staggered he was still left, for up to 4 hours at a time, alone at home. We never had any problems and he seemed fine with it but I wouldn't expect someone re-homing a dog to think it was ideal, it wouldn't suit many dogs. My own views on dogs with children are that dogs don't understand children, and putting them with children, who don't perhaps understand them, is not only dangerous for the child but could be a death sentence for the dog. There are many videos on the internet of dogs with small babies and children, there are probably many we don't see which didn't end as well.
    It's just democracy.

  37. #37
    Master woodacre1983's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldoakknives View Post
    Yes I know they have rules that can sometimes sound silly or over sensitive. Please bear in mind that any mistakes on their part could easily end up being very detrimental to their work. Yes people who have dogs that live with cats, young children, small furry pets etc but can you imagine the headlines if a rescue dog harmed any of these? I have a spaniel at the moment, and before him had another spaniel who lived to 13. We're both retired now so have plenty of time for him, but when we got our previous spaniel we were both still working. Although our hours were staggered he was still left, for up to 4 hours at a time, alone at home. We never had any problems and he seemed fine with it but I wouldn't expect someone re-homing a dog to think it was ideal, it wouldn't suit many dogs. My own views on dogs with children are that dogs don't understand children, and putting them with children, who don't perhaps understand them, is not only dangerous for the child but could be a death sentence for the dog. There are many videos on the internet of dogs with small babies and children, there are probably many we don't see which didn't end as well.
    I agree completely. Dogs and kids are a potential bad area. But they take the rule of definite. No questions no visits just kids no. So we went the puppy route...
    now I have a 2,8,11,12 and 15 year olds. My young kids are never alone with the dog. We are perfectly capable as a family of homing a rescue spaniel and giving it a great home yet we are not even considered. My point is only no wonder many automatically go for puppies.


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  38. #38
    Master Chinnock's Avatar
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    OK maybe I’m biased, but for me the puppy stage is so very important from a socialisation and bonding point of view and I would do it no other way. No pain, no gain, that’s the reward you get from raising a puppy.

    I’m also a major Labrador fan. Loyal, loving and intelligent breed.

  39. #39
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodacre1983 View Post
    I agree completely. Dogs and kids are a potential bad area. But they take the rule of definite. No questions no visits just kids no. So we went the puppy route...
    now I have a 2,8,11,12 and 15 year olds. My young kids are never alone with the dog. We are perfectly capable as a family of homing a rescue spaniel and giving it a great home yet we are not even considered. My point is only no wonder many automatically go for puppies.


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    I understand your point and agree, I do however see their view as well.
    It's just democracy.

  40. #40
    Master Kirk280's Avatar
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    Depending on how you are feline, you could get a cat instead?

    Dogs are smelly, biting, sh1tting bar-stewards.

    Sorry if this is ruff-love.

  41. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by woodacre1983 View Post
    The problem is those two rules are blanket rules.
    So despite my house being empty for those hours my current dog I got as a puppy is looked after by caring relatives. The kids one is another common rule. Been told by many dog shelters it’s not individually assessed just a rule.
    Animal shelters are very keen to rehome dogs as there's a constant supply in need of rehoming, so I'd hope you would appreciate that the rules are there because they feel the need for them and that they do not wish to take the risk of their charges ending up in an unsuitable location.
    In an ideal world they could be able to assess every single application with meetings, home visits, references, etc but they don't have the resources to do so.
    A case in point: one dog we took on as foster was completely unsuited to being around children and her seperation anxiety took nearly a year of careful management for it to subside. How many people would or could have the patience, the effort or the time to be able to deal with that? Some yes, but not that many.

    But of course there are alternate avenues open to obtaining a dog other than through rehoming organisations whose selection criteria doesn't suit potential owners.

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  42. #42
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk280 View Post
    Depending on how you are feline, you could get a cat instead?

    Dogs are smelly, biting, sh1tting bar-stewards.

    Sorry if this is ruff-love.
    I think baiting is a more apt term.
    It's just democracy.

  43. #43
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralphy View Post
    Animal shelters are very keen to rehome dogs as there's a constant supply in need of rehoming, so I'd hope you would appreciate that the rules are there because they feel the need for them and that they do not wish to take the risk of their charges ending up in an unsuitable location.
    In an ideal world they could be able to assess every single application with meetings, home visits, references, etc but they don't have the resources to do so.
    A case in point: one dog we took on as foster was completely unsuited to being around children and her seperation anxiety took nearly a year of careful management for it to subside. How many people would or could have the patience, the effort or the time to be able to deal with that? Some yes, but not that many.

    But of course there are alternate avenues open to obtaining a dog other than through rehoming organisations whose selection criteria doesn't suit potential owners.

    R
    This is the point really. And spaniel aid is a small charity run by volunteers, so their resources can't stretch to assessing every application on individual terms. Some generalisation has to take place.
    It's just democracy.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    I would recommend taking something else than a Lab. Not because there is anything wrong with this gorgeous breed but because your previous dog was one. It will be extremely difficult for everyone in the family to avoid comparing/confusing them, and its not fair on one of them.
    I can see what you are saying, but not sure I agree. My sister and her husband married nearly forty years ago and immediately had a black lab puppy, when he was about three they got another. And they have had a continuous cycle of delightfull black labs ever since. As one sadly passes they always have the younger one still about the house and the expectation of a new arrival as soon as they find a suitable pup. Their two daughters have hence grown up with two labradors in the house their entire lives, and one now has a black lab of her own (the other daughter has a daschund).

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  45. #45
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruggertech View Post
    I can see what you are saying, but not sure I agree. My sister and her husband married nearly forty years ago and immediately had a black lab puppy, when he was about three they got another. And they have had a continuous cycle of delightfull black labs ever since. As one sadly passes they always have the younger one still about the house and the expectation of a new arrival as soon as they find a suitable pup. Their two daughters have hence grown up with two labradors in the house their entire lives, and one now has a black lab of her own (the other daughter has a daschund).
    I agree with your example but it is very different: in your case its a continued ownership, the dogs are there together and you enjoy their personality at the same time. When one passes away, the other is still there and provides a link to welcome a new one. It is very different from having a single dog for 10 years +, mourning him then getting another.
    Memento Mori

  46. #46
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    I agree with your example but it is very different: in your case its a continued ownership, the dogs are there together and you enjoy their personality at the same time. When one passes away, the other is still there and provides a link to welcome a new one. It is very different from having a single dog for 10 years +, mourning him then getting another.
    Yes, I see that, very true.

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    I have owned a few different breeds of dogs over the years including a Great dane, Samoyed, Pit Bull and a Chocolate lab.

    All the dogs have been special in there own way with very different temperaments and personalities.

    The Fox red lab we have at the moment is the most affectionate loyal and intelligent dog, just be prepared for the coat shedding and long walks are needed.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurmot View Post
    We are, and our previous dogs have all been 2nd hand. We've never had a puppy and I am wondering if it's something we should experience, although SWMBO is already leaning towards a rescue.
    We've been very lucky with our two and had Bo, just about to turn 10, as a pup from Labrador Rescue and then we got Deacon, just turned 1, as a pup from Dogs Trust. We lost a boy last year and did rescue a Staffie a couple of months after but he'd been starving on the streets so attacked Bo badly a few times over food and had to go back sadly, hence deciding we wanted a puppy rescue as she was shaken by the experience and wary of other older dogs.

    Best of luck with your search. I'm going to start looking for another rescue in the New Year.


  49. #49
    Journeyman Chiefs's Avatar
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    A dog is bit commitment, so my advice is get the breed that you truly want. When you're out on a walk and it's freezing cold, pitch black and you're hunting for the steaming poo to pack it into a little bag you're not going to want any regrets in your decision.

    I have an 8 year old fox red Lab and wouldn't change him for anything. He can be a little crazy, but never barks and has been around our children since they were born.

    Hips, elbows and the brain can be scanned and scored, but I don't believe knees are. First knee/ cruciate ligament went went he was 18 months (TPLO surgery) was covered by insurance, the 2nd one wasn't. The vet bill was insane, like I could have bought 8 more dogs for the same price! So my only advice for the labs is get pet insurance that covers issues for life and doesn't have a bilateral clause which prevents you claiming for conditioning that could happen on both sides, eyes, ears, legs etc.

  50. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by beechcustom View Post
    Please consider a rescue dog rather than lining the pockets of breeders. There are so many out there needing homes it's heart breaking.
    Whilst I agree that there are so many rescue dogs needing homes, and the best thing most people can do if they're after a dog is to rehome one, I think the term 'lining the pockets' is rather off the mark, I've never met a rich dog breeder, they're always skint and knackered from what I can see. I'm aware that there are people making a lot of money from puppy farming, but there are also plenty of responsible breeders out there, if you've decided a rehomed dog isn't for you. We have three pedigree dogs, from a skint, tired breeder, but have resolved to get a rescue dog next time.

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