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Thread: New Knees for Old - not for the squeamish!

  1. #51
    Master Harry Smith's Avatar
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    Jan 2017
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    I was on my way to this situation due to accidents and general wear and (literally) tear. I was late 50's and suffering pain and inflammation requiring draining/steroids physio etc. Then I decided to do something I'd not for many years namely gym, specifically spin classes. It was bloody painful and a bit embarrassing but I can say now that after nearly 3 years of 3 classes a week that my knees are better than could be expected of any fit 200lb 60ish year old chap who used to have knackered knees.
    I've had quite a few injuries over the years most recently a shoulder dislocation following a bicycle off (popped straight back in luckily) which I have also just about sorted using exercise and posture therapy.
    My point is that if possible to try and use some form of exercise to strengthen the muscles around injury, before it's too late, to forestall the drastic surgery as examplified(?) in the above.
    I now monitor everything, heart rate, blood pressure and food intake to maintain a reasonable/non-fanatic level of health and fitness but also feel better prepared to deal with the inevitable age (and probably more accidents) related issues to come.

  2. #52
    Craftsman
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    Apr 2018
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    I have come to this thread for the first time this evening.

    I am 49 and have always been active.

    I started to experience left knee pain in June. It worsened quickly and in September I was diagnosed with Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee. I am currently non-weight bearing and on crutches for 3 months. The condition can resolve. 2 months in I have not noticed any improvement. If that remains the case then I am told I will need a total knee replacement. I need another scan next month then see the surgeon in Jan.

    If I need a TKR then so be it. I would rather not have to have it, particularly at my age. But I don't want to continue with the pain and impact on my ability to do the things I enjoy. My worry though is the longevity of the replacement joint and whether a further op will be needed later in life.

    I hate being inactive at the moment.

    Peter - I hope your recuperation and rehabilitation goes well and look forward to hearing how things progress.



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  3. #53
    Grand Master Griswold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hocuspocus View Post
    I have come to this thread for the first time this evening.

    I am 49 and have always been active.

    I started to experience left knee pain in June. It worsened quickly and in September I was diagnosed with Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee. I am currently non-weight bearing and on crutches for 3 months. The condition can resolve. 2 months in I have not noticed any improvement. If that remains the case then I am told I will need a total knee replacement. I need another scan next month then see the surgeon in Jan.

    If I need a TKR then so be it. I would rather not have to have it, particularly at my age. But I don't want to continue with the pain and impact on my ability to do the things I enjoy. My worry though is the longevity of the replacement joint and whether a further op will be needed later in life.

    I hate being inactive at the moment.

    Peter - I hope your recuperation and rehabilitation goes well and look forward to hearing how things progress.



    Sent from my SM-A202F using TZ-UK mobile app
    Thanks for the good wishes.

    One of my Daughters-in-Law had to have a knee replacement when she was 40 following a skiing accident. After 6 months she did a 100k cycle ride for charity, (and has done several more since), she plays netball 2 to 3 nights a week and goes to the gym regularly. If it wasn't for the scar you wouldn't know she'd had it done.

    The consultant who did my op said the new knee should be good for around 12 years and I'm guessing a further op would be needed then, (maybe The Doc on here can advise further?). I don't know if that involves replacement of the metal parts or just the artificial cartilage between them - if the latter then it should be quite straightforward, I hope. I'm just coming up to 72 and the technology may have improved further by then.

    I'm now 4 days in following the op. The left leg is very swollen, causing it to be stiff; but has been fully load-bearing since the day of the op. Very little pain whist sitting or laying down, but very painful with any sudden or quick movement of the leg! I have no problems getting around the house on crutches and getting into or out of chairs, but getting in and out of bed can be a pain, literally.

    The only real issue I've had so far is constipation! That was a right pain in the ar#e, literally! I put that down to the co codamol which I've stopped taking - evil stuff and I'd rather a little more pain in the leg than the pain, discomfort and mind numbingness of constipation!

    I do so hope your condition resolves to the point of not needing the op and you going back to all the things you did prior to your current condition. When you've been active all your life, being forced into inactivity is no fun at all. Good luck with your next assessment, let us know how you get on.
    Best Regards - Peter

    I hate being bipolar, its brilliant.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Griswold View Post

    The consultant who did my op said the new knee should be good for around 12 years and I'm guessing a further op would be needed then, (maybe The Doc on here can advise further?). I
    The latest National data says 95% of knee replacements were still going strong at 14yrs, with a mean age at operation of 69yrs of age. I can't comment on your TKR.
    The younger you are, the more cycles of wear you are going to put it through , per year.

    When it fails we offer a Revision Knee Replacement, which is harder to do, higher risks, less flexion but can work well for another 10-20yrs.

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