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Thread: Replacing everest crown and tube

  1. #1
    Master adzman808's Avatar
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    Replacing everest crown and tube

    I posted this in the timefactors forum, but Iíve not had any responses, maybe itíll fly a little higher here...

    The attachments are in the other post here

    https://forum.tz-uk.com/showthread.p...n-Please-Help!

    Any advice gratefully received

    if the below is TL:DR

    Then,

    I want to replace the crown and pendant tube on my everest

    Eddie doesnít have and canít get the parts

    Iíd like to go with a double threaded tube and water proof crown

    Any suggestions and (ideally uk) part sources?

    Thanks very much

    =====

    Hi everyone,

    Maybe I should post this in mods and wreckers (but I've done neither yet...)

    The crown and crown tube on my PRS-25 Everest (mk1 acrylic) is quite worn

    It's not yet a disaster, because although the crown is a bit tricky to get going to screw it down, it manages 2 full turns and does screw down tightly.

    However, clearly it'll need a replacement at some stage.

    I've contacted Eddie, but he's no longer able to source replacement parts.

    I've spoken with a forum favourite watch maker, and he's (quite understandably) said, you get the bits and I'll do the work

    I'm struggling a bit here...

    I'd like to replace both the crown and pendant tube, the tube's definitely damaged, so I can't believe the crown isn't

    My first point of confusion is how the tube is attached to the case...

    Eddie assures me that it's pressed and soldered in...

    (and I don't doubt that)

    But when I look at the pendant tube hole from the movement side I can clearly see that it is threaded.... (hopefully you can too on the attached pictures)

    Ideally I'd like to replace the tube with one that threads into the case.

    As far as I can tell, Cousins sell only a small selection of threaded pendant tubes and no waterproof crowns that fit them (is there a FFS emoji?)

    eBay offers me aftermarket Rolex crown and tube sets, and Cousins sell a Rolex case thread tap (as in tap and die set tap, not stem size tap)

    The Rolex (sic) items are designed for a 2.5mm case hole and the Everest appears (it's a bit hard to measure without taking the crystal out) to have 2mm case hole

    Then I'm thinking the 'Rolex' one* might be the way to go..... as I'll (or whoever does this work) have 0.5mm to play with in regards to drilling out the existing stem and my gut is telling me that it's got to be easier to drill hole bigger and run a tap down it, than it is to press in a threadless pendant tube and solder it in....

    (Some internet wisdom suggests that pressed and soldered pendant tubes are not meant to be replaced....)

    Thoughts?

    Help!!!

    Any assistance...?

    Any of you ever done this?

    Can any of you point me the parts I actually need, and will fit without a major case rework?


    (*the irony of this in regards to the Everest is not lost on me.... yes I'd file the rolex coronet off)

  2. #2
    Craftsman
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    Broach the old tube out tap the hole and fit a Rolex case tube and one of cousin's copy Rolex crowns which is the same, just without the crown logo.

  3. #3
    Craftsman
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    If the original tube is threaded you can use a reverse threaded tool to remove it if it isn't splined like modern Rolex tubes. Or if it won't come out broach it out.
    Then measure the size and work out what will fit, if it is M2.5 then done just put a Rolex one in. If it is M2 then broach the threads out to make a hole just bigger than 2mm (2.05mm). Then use a tap to make the M2.5 thread.

    Loctite and the matching Rolex case tube tool to put the new tube in. Swap crowns and check stem length, then job done.

    I can understand why someone wouldn't want to do this without the parts to just fit in. If it is this complicated then it will take time to do it right ensuring the hole is straight and accurate and you don't want to make it too big etc. Not easy to do this and keep it water resistant.

    Have you considered just taking it to a watchmaker who can remove the movement, crown and stem then see exactly what size the hole is and how the tube is fitted?

  4. #4
    Master adzman808's Avatar
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    Thank you very much, thatís very helpful advice.

    If the incumbent pendant tube is threaded, am I right in assuming itíll be a thread that needs to be turned clockwise to unscrew it?

    If (as Eddie says, and he should know) the tube is soldered in, does that make any difference to how Iíd have to remove it? (Perhaps Iíd need to file off the external threaded part, dress the resultant flange then press it out)

    I would like to get someone to do this for me... Iíd like to think I could manage it... but equally Iíve never done anything like this on a watch before (drifted out plenty of bearings and bushes in my time, drilled and tapped quite a few holes too, but all on a far larger scale than a wrist watch)

    I do have a reasonable go to watch guy here (Iím in Portugal) but I think heís on holiday, but I might swing by there later and check again (third timeís the charm)

    Iím a little conscious of cost... itís not an expensive watch, itís not worth a lot and some of Cousins Rolex taps cost in excess of £40... they have a couple of cheapies, so I could always make that the base of whatever pendant tube I bought... but I fear that may end up being the tail wagging the dog (picking a tube size based on a cheap tap, then choosing a crown based on the tube)

    One thing that mystifies me.... if the case hole for the tube is threaded, what on earth is the tube doing being pressed and soldered in there? I appreciate Iím applying logic from non-watch engineering applications, but pushing a plain tube into a threaded hole seems rather counter productive in terms of WR and quality of fit.

    Ultimately, the crown requires care to get going when screwing then manages just over two full turns, so itís still perfectly functional for now.

    I was just going to write it off.... it never seemed to keep great time and was a pain to regulate (very sensitive to reg arm adjustment) but I fairly recently got a timing machine, cut my teeth using it with the Everest and for the first time in the 5 years Iíve had it, itís running very well at a consistent +3 to +5 so I figure it deserves wear and use!

    Thanks again, Iíve been overly verbose here so I might end up replying with just my actual questions!

    In my head I had this down as a job in a similar vein to replacing a driveshaft gator... a bit tricky... not beyond the home mechanic who has the correct tools, but best done by a pro as itís a common enough repair and theyíll manage it fairly easily.

    Instead it seems to be a bit of a black art.... let me guess..... ďwelcome to the world of watch repairĒ :D


    Thanks again

  5. #5
    Craftsman
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    If you can get a crown and tube that are to your satisfaction Iím willing to have a go at fitting them, no matter press and solder or thread in.
    Making a tap is not that hard (with the right tools), and then Iíll have a case tube tap... :)
    Iím in the UK if that makes a difference.

    Dave

  6. #6
    Master adzman808's Avatar
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    Thank you very much Dave,

    Let me see if I can actually get to see my watch guy, and if he canít help...

    Iím in the UK fairly frequently (not a million miles from you in Bletchley) and I have a uk postal address



    Quote Originally Posted by Dave S View Post
    If you can get a crown and tube that are to your satisfaction Iím willing to have a go at fitting them, no matter press and solder or thread in.
    Making a tap is not that hard (with the right tools), and then Iíll have a case tube tap... :)
    Iím in the UK if that makes a difference.

    Dave

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