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Thread: External wood treatment advice

  1. #1
    Master ed335d's Avatar
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    External wood treatment advice

    I had a load of 4 x 2 (ish) wood left over from a decking removal and decided to build a garden table today.

    I intend to give the top a jolly good sanding tomorrow and would like to keep a natural wood finish (or enhance it if possible). I'll probably paint the legs, as I used all the rough bits for those; I don't think it'll sand too well, as there's quite a lot of old screw heads that have been hammered into the wood and it'll strip any sanding materials.

    It's going to be outside all year round, so I'm after any advice on what to use to protect the top from the elements. I'll probably just find some exterior furniture paint for the underside, once she's decided on the colour.


  2. #2
    Craftsman
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    I'd go with a maintenance finish like an oil rather than some kind of thick film finish,

    I'd go with basic teak oil - essentially Danish oil with some added UV stabilizers. So essentially an oil finish soaks in, meaning you can easily add coats right ontop - well ideally you'd do a scuff sand each time you add a coat. You probably would look at adding a thin coat every 6 months or so after the initial treatment of 3-4 coats.

    Problem with an exterior film finish like a yacht varnish is you have to resand back to bare every time the finish wears out.

  3. #3
    Master ed335d's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ejtrent View Post
    I'd go with a maintenance finish like an oil rather than some kind of thick film finish,

    I'd go with basic teak oil - essentially Danish oil with some added UV stabilizers. So essentially an oil finish soaks in, meaning you can easily add coats right ontop - well ideally you'd do a scuff sand each time you add a coat. You probably would look at adding a thin coat every 6 months or so after the initial treatment of 3-4 coats.

    Problem with an exterior film finish like a yacht varnish is you have to resand back to bare every time the finish wears out.
    any particular brands that are better than others?

    Also, does it come in different shades/depths?

    Sorry if these are obvious questions!

  4. #4
    Have had good results indoor and out with different versions of Poly x.
    A little more expensive than other brands but very good

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  5. #5
    Craftsman
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    Hey bud,

    If you're looking for the nicest experience Liberon make a really nice Teak Oil but if I'm honest I've got similarly fine results with basic own brand options,

    Colour wise its typically a clear, but this does tend to add a slight amber hue given it's oil based nature.

    If you'd like to colour it, I'd recommend a wood dye instead of a stain as much like the Teak Oil the dye soaks in where a standard stain will just sit on the top and potentially seal it up making it harder to soak up the Teak Oil after,

  6. #6
    Master ed335d's Avatar
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    Thanks chaps, Iíll let you know how I get on.

    This is what Iím up against


  7. #7
    Craftsman
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    Cracking job mate, enjoy!

  8. #8
    Recently used Rustins danish oil on an old teak bench
    Seems pretty good so far
    If you want colour, canít do better than Sadolin superdec
    Thatís what the pros use on beach huts in the area, itís water based and comes in loads of colours too

  9. #9
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by ed335d View Post
    I had a load of 4 x 2 (ish) wood left over from a decking removal and decided to build a garden table today.

    I intend to give the top a jolly good sanding tomorrow and would like to keep a natural wood finish (or enhance it if possible). I'll probably paint the legs, as I used all the rough bits for those; I don't think it'll sand too well, as there's quite a lot of old screw heads that have been hammered into the wood and it'll strip any sanding materials.

    It's going to be outside all year round, so I'm after any advice on what to use to protect the top from the elements. I'll probably just find some exterior furniture paint for the underside, once she's decided on the colour.

    Would agree going the oil route rather than varnish/film on a table.
    I have used various brand teak oils. They usually darken things up a bit but not that much. What I like is you do not have to be too precise. Slap it on every year or two and you are good to go. Might take a bit more oil the first time btw.

  10. #10
    Master ed335d's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ejtrent View Post
    Cracking job mate, enjoy!


    Quote Originally Posted by GOAT View Post
    Recently used Rustins danish oil on an old teak bench
    Seems pretty good so far
    If you want colour, canít do better than Sadolin superdec
    Thatís what the pros use on beach huts in the area, itís water based and comes in loads of colours too
    Thanks, I'll have a look at those

    Quote Originally Posted by JP28 View Post
    Would agree going the oil route rather than varnish/film on a table.
    I have used various brand teak oils. They usually darken things up a bit but not that much. What I like is you do not have to be too precise. Slap it on every year or two and you are good to go. Might take a bit more oil the first time btw.
    Looks like oil it will be

  11. #11
    Master ed335d's Avatar
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    Went with the Liberon teak oil.

    Before



    After a 50/80/120 sand



    After 1st coat



    Thanks for all the advice!

  12. #12
    Master Franco's Avatar
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    Goo job, the final finish and colour are excellent in my opinion. Make sure that you treat below and near junctions.

    F

  13. #13
    Master ed335d's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Franco View Post
    Goo job, the final finish and colour are excellent in my opinion. Make sure that you treat below and near junctions.

    F
    Will do!

    The Liberon oil seems pretty good. Managed to get a second coat on this morning.




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  14. #14
    Master
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    Nice job on both making the table and the sealing. Oil is a good choice and table is looking good!

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