closing tag is in template navbar
timefactors watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Page 7 of 9 FirstFirst ... 56789 LastLast
Results 301 to 350 of 425

Thread: Classic Cars what do you have

  1. #301
    Master
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    By the TOLL Road
    Posts
    3,259
    Blog Entries
    1
    Nah Minilites rule

    Wires are 50s and 60s

    Minilites and Rostyles are 70s early 80s
    Last edited by hilly10; 28th March 2019 at 23:26.

  2. #302
    Master thieuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    GMT+1
    Posts
    6,697
    Blog Entries
    1
    True, but when ‘driven in anger’ w/wheels are not reassuring! Sort of Elvis at the Ed Sullivan Show - movement-wise that is.

  3. #303
    Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Petersfield, Hampshire
    Posts
    5,406
    Quote Originally Posted by thieuster View Post
    True, but when ‘driven in anger’ w/wheels are not reassuring! Sort of Elvis at the Ed Sullivan Show - movement-wise that is.
    These it is then:


  4. #304
    Revolutions - boring, try for something really different - Dunlop D1?_DSC0788 by David Brenchley, on Flickr

  5. #305
    Master
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    By the TOLL Road
    Posts
    3,259
    Blog Entries
    1
    Those are nice

  6. #306
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wakefield, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    17,833
    I’m a great believer in sticking with the correct wheels for the car. By the late 60s/early 70s wire wheels were very passe, MG and Triumph sports cars had steel wheels that suited the cars perfectly, they’re correct for the period and usually they stand up to wear and tear very well. I dislike the trend for fitting Minilite alloys to these cars, back in the 70s nobody had TRs, Spitfires or MGs with those wheels and to my eyes they never look right. The original TR6 wheels suit the car best, and the Rostyle wheels are the best choice for a 70s MG. I guess its down to personal preference, but that’s how I see it.

  7. #307
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    22,591
    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    I’m a great believer in sticking with the correct wheels for the car. By the late 60s/early 70s wire wheels were very passe, MG and Triumph sports cars had steel wheels that suited the cars perfectly, they’re correct for the period and usually they stand up to wear and tear very well. I dislike the trend for fitting Minilite alloys to these cars, back in the 70s nobody had TRs, Spitfires or MGs with those wheels and to my eyes they never look right. The original TR6 wheels suit the car best, and the Rostyle wheels are the best choice for a 70s MG. I guess its down to personal preference, but that’s how I see it.
    The ride of many a car has be ruined by the wrong wheel choices. It's as if people know better than the original designers. Plus people also forget how heavy some modern alloys wheels are compared with the original pressed steel versions - unless of course you can afford to go magnesium - which become brittle over time.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  8. #308
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,174
    I am presently awaiting the downside of classic car ownership - the bill... My 928 is in for a major service, including timing belt replacement and a couple of other bits (persistent coolant leak from somewhere, rear caliper plate lift, transmission overhaul). This is the point at which I seriously start to fantasise about having a roomy garage with a lift or a pit, so I could do this sort of stuff myself!

  9. #309
    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    I’m a great believer in sticking with the correct wheels for the car. By the late 60s/early 70s wire wheels were very passe, MG and Triumph sports cars had steel wheels that suited the cars perfectly, they’re correct for the period and usually they stand up to wear and tear very well. I dislike the trend for fitting Minilite alloys to these cars, back in the 70s nobody had TRs, Spitfires or MGs with those wheels and to my eyes they never look right. The original TR6 wheels suit the car best, and the Rostyle wheels are the best choice for a 70s MG. I guess its down to personal preference, but that’s how I see it.
    My early TR6 had factory wires fitted as standard, though I agree that the dished alloys suit the car better.

    Not keen on the Rostyles and had a set of minilites on my '72 BGT. The best wheels were the Dunlop alloys on my BGT V8, but they only look good if you have a factory V8 rather than a wannabe.

  10. #310
    Master Incredible Sulk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    3 Degrees West
    Posts
    1,241
    Quote Originally Posted by j0hnbarker View Post
    My early TR6 had factory wires fitted as standard, though I agree that the dished alloys suit the car better.

    Not keen on the Rostyles and had a set of minilites on my '72 BGT. The best wheels were the Dunlop alloys on my BGT V8, but they only look good if you have a factory V8 rather than a wannabe.
    I thought the standard TR6 wheels were steel?

  11. #311
    Quote Originally Posted by Incredible Sulk View Post
    I thought the standard TR6 wheels were steel?
    Sorry - my mistake as alloys seem synonymous with wheels nowadays. They were dished steel wheels!

  12. #312
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    wakefield
    Posts
    194
    [QUOTE=PreacherCain;5071698]I am presently awaiting the downside of classic car ownership - the bill...

    wow that sounds like a bill that would buy a really nice watch :-)

  13. #313
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Chesterfield
    Posts
    668
    Previous owner of my 76 Midget changed the original Rostyles with Minilite copies during one of many refurbishments. I prefer them but not suitable for all.

  14. #314
    Master thieuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    GMT+1
    Posts
    6,697
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by PreacherCain View Post
    I am presently awaiting the downside of classic car ownership - the bill... My 928 is in for a major service, including timing belt replacement and a couple of other bits (persistent coolant leak from somewhere, rear caliper plate lift, transmission overhaul). This is the point at which I seriously start to fantasise about having a roomy garage with a lift or a pit, so I could do this sort of stuff myself!
    The bill will be the same as the price of a roomy garage, I suppose

  15. #315
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Isle of Ynys Mon, Wales
    Posts
    678
    Quote Originally Posted by PreacherCain View Post
    I am presently awaiting the downside of classic car ownership - the bill... My 928 is in for a major service, including timing belt replacement and a couple of other bits (persistent coolant leak from somewhere, rear caliper plate lift, transmission overhaul). This is the point at which I seriously start to fantasise about having a roomy garage with a lift or a pit, so I could do this sort of stuff myself!
    But it'll all be worth it (and forgotten) by the time you put a posh wax on the bodywork

  16. #316
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    22,591
    Quote Originally Posted by PreacherCain View Post
    I am presently awaiting the downside of classic car ownership - the bill... My 928 is in for a major service, including timing belt replacement and a couple of other bits (persistent coolant leak from somewhere, rear caliper plate lift, transmission overhaul). This is the point at which I seriously start to fantasise about having a roomy garage with a lift or a pit, so I could do this sort of stuff myself!

    In fairness some of those things need doing on most cars - even fairly modern one. A cambelt change on a Skoda Citigo is £499.

    The leak sounds like a gasket somewhere. The transmission overhaul and calliper lift could be expensive. Not sure if yours is an S2 or S4, but the rear 4 pot calipers are quite sort after as they are often used to replace the 2 pot rear callipers on 964. Do some homework because alternatives often exist if they do need replacing. I have some 2 pot calipers which might fit if necessary.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  17. #317
    Master
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    By the TOLL Road
    Posts
    3,259
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Incredible Sulk View Post
    I thought the standard TR6 wheels were steel?
    They were 72 onwards. Wires 68 to 72

  18. #318
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,174
    Quote Originally Posted by Andyg View Post
    In fairness some of those things need doing on most cars - even fairly modern one. A cambelt change on a Skoda Citigo is £499.

    The leak sounds like a gasket somewhere. The transmission overhaul and calliper lift could be expensive. Not sure if yours is an S2 or S4, but the rear 4 pot calipers are quite sort after as they are often used to replace the 2 pot rear callipers on 964. Do some homework because alternatives often exist if they do need replacing. I have some 2 pot calipers which might fit if necessary.
    Yep, the coolant leak is from the main O-ring on the water bridge at the front of the engine, so the "vee" has a nice puddle of crud and coolant in it at all times... Trouble is, getting that sorted means lifting the inlet manifold, which means I may as well replace all the vac hoses, rubbers and the knock sensors while it's off, or Sod's Law of Motor Mechanics will apply and one of those items will fail in six weeks' time.

    The calipers are what they are, fundamentally - I had the fronts done a couple of years ago and the bill wasn't too bad. Oddly enough I have a set of early S4 calipers gathering dust in the basement somewhere; they're properly scruffy (lacquer hanging off etc) but the plates look OK so if push comes to shove I might just swap the rears.

    The timing belt is just insurance, really. It's only 15,000 miles old and the workshop manuals state an interval of 60,000 - but it's also 5 years old and causes horribly expensive things to happen if it fails, so I consider it a worthwhile investment!

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Suds View Post
    But it'll all be worth it (and forgotten) by the time you put a posh wax on the bodywork
    Ha, true!

  19. #319
    Master thieuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    GMT+1
    Posts
    6,697
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by PreacherCain View Post
    Yep, the coolant leak is from the main O-ring on the water bridge at the front of the engine, so the "vee" has a nice puddle of crud and coolant in it at all times... Trouble is, getting that sorted means lifting the inlet manifold, which means I may as well replace all the vac hoses, rubbers and the knock sensors while it's off, or Sod's Law of Motor Mechanics will apply and one of those items will fail in six weeks' time.

    The calipers are what they are, fundamentally - I had the fronts done a couple of years ago and the bill wasn't too bad. Oddly enough I have a set of early S4 calipers gathering dust in the basement somewhere; they're properly scruffy (lacquer hanging off etc) but the plates look OK so if push comes to shove I might just swap the rears.

    The timing belt is just insurance, really. It's only 15,000 miles old and the workshop manuals state an interval of 60,000 - but it's also 5 years old and causes horribly expensive things to happen if it fails, so I consider it a worthwhile investment!

    - - - Updated - - -


    Ha, true!
    Do you use an indy or a Porsche dealer? Dealer labour rates are ott here: hitting the 160 euros/hr VAT included. That's solicitor's money!

    Menno

  20. #320
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Berkshire UK
    Posts
    6,405
    The Porsche independant I use has rates of £80 per hour before VAT which I'm OK with, running a garage has large overheads unfortunately!

  21. #321
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,174
    I use an independent in London (RGA) - still £80 an hour or thereabouts so I think there will be at least £1,200 of labour charges alone for the stuff I need sorted. Still, Bob knows the 928 well and he and the team do good work, so it's worth it to keep the old girl going well.

  22. #322
    Master thieuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    GMT+1
    Posts
    6,697
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Thewatchbloke View Post
    The Porsche independant I use has rates of £80 per hour before VAT which I'm OK with, running a garage has large overheads unfortunately!
    I know a thing or two, three about running a garage & large overheads... well, let's say that 50% of the main dealers' overhead has to do with the showroom costs. Most are too large, built on a too expensive plot of land, with high ceilings (= hard to heat) with expensive personnel doing nothing that lures money in a large part of the week... Sadly, most dealers have to comply with the factory standard - and more. E.g. Porsche main dealers have to buy Porsche's website look-and-feel from the factory's web designers for a big sum before they can 'personalise it' and have to pay a large annual fee for updates etc.

    Lots of dealers here are not allowed to display second-hand cars from other brands on their forecourts. They have to sell those cars on to traders, who know that the dealer is between a rock and hard place with that car, thus offering less!

    Menno

  23. #323
    Master Incredible Sulk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    3 Degrees West
    Posts
    1,241
    Quote Originally Posted by PreacherCain View Post
    I use an independent in London (RGA) - still £80 an hour or thereabouts so I think there will be at least £1,200 of labour charges alone for the stuff I need sorted. Still, Bob knows the 928 well and he and the team do good work, so it's worth it to keep the old girl going well.
    Is he still going? I remember him as being middle aged back in the early 90's when he looked after my 944!

    He was a bit of a star though. He was always around the railway arch at the weekends, which was handy as mine always seemed to develop faults on Sundays.

  24. #324
    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    I’m a great believer in sticking with the correct wheels for the car. By the late 60s/early 70s wire wheels were very passe, MG and Triumph sports cars had steel wheels that suited the cars perfectly, they’re correct for the period and usually they stand up to wear and tear very well. I dislike the trend for fitting Minilite alloys to these cars, back in the 70s nobody had TRs, Spitfires or MGs with those wheels and to my eyes they never look right. The original TR6 wheels suit the car best, and the Rostyle wheels are the best choice for a 70s MG. I guess its down to personal preference, but that’s how I see it.
    My dad has had Midgets from the mid to late '60s to now, and they have all had Minilites. I've got pictures of me in the "back" of a Midget with Minilites in 1972, and I'm sure he'd already had them on that car for years.

    Having said that the "new" car is apparently getting Revolutions.

  25. #325
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Southern Spain
    Posts
    23,170
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Andyg View Post
    - unless of course you can afford to go magnesium - which become brittle over time.
    and such the myth plods on.

    Agree with owners generally not thínking about the weight of alloy replacements. The weight differences are jaw dropping, without including magnesium. From 3.5 kilo for a quality forged one to 9 even 10 for an El Cheapo cast one (6,5J 15").
    Last edited by Huertecilla; 10th April 2019 at 12:14.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  26. #326
    Master
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,562
    Quote Originally Posted by j0hnbarker View Post
    My early TR6 had factory wires fitted as standard, though I agree that the dished alloys suit the car better.

    Not keen on the Rostyles and had a set of minilites on my '72 BGT. The best wheels were the Dunlop alloys on my BGT V8, but they only look good if you have a factory V8 rather than a wannabe.
    A good friend of mine recently picked up a slightly accident damaged original factory MBG GT V8 for the princely sum of £1800 quid..

    Car is complete and has done 30k miles. Apparently the accident happened in Austria in the mid 80’s and the car was repatriated for repair but it never happened. The original owner died and the widow now living in Australia wanted the car which was in storage in Shropshire gone...

    Barn finds are still out there...

  27. #327
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Berkshire UK
    Posts
    6,405
    Quote Originally Posted by thieuster View Post
    I know a thing or two, three about running a garage & large overheads... well, let's say that 50% of the main dealers' overhead has to do with the showroom costs. Most are too large, built on a too expensive plot of land, with high ceilings (= hard to heat) with expensive personnel doing nothing that lures money in a large part of the week... Sadly, most dealers have to comply with the factory standard - and more. E.g. Porsche main dealers have to buy Porsche's website look-and-feel from the factory's web designers for a big sum before they can 'personalise it' and have to pay a large annual fee for updates etc.

    Lots of dealers here are not allowed to display second-hand cars from other brands on their forecourts. They have to sell those cars on to traders, who know that the dealer is between a rock and hard place with that car, thus offering less!

    Menno
    My local Porsche main dealer in Reading (the UK head office) was reported as charging £234 per hour back in 2017 and won the title of the most expensive labour rate in the UK.

    Their parts department is fantastic though, invariably I get my parts from their as they are cheaper than anywhere else I've found. Mind you they should be!

  28. #328
    Craftsman Integrale's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Durham UK
    Posts
    401
    Porsche offer reduced labour charges for classics. They want to draw the work back in. Routine work on mine is not much more than the recognised independents. Ask the question.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using TZ-UK mobile app

  29. #329
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Berkshire UK
    Posts
    6,405
    Mine isn't a classic unfortunately.

  30. #330
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Southern Spain
    Posts
    23,170
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by hilly10 View Post

    Minilites and Rostyles are 70s early 80s
    Don´t forget the ATS A-style.
    Optional OEM for Volvos, Opels p.e. those days. And DAF ofcourse





    Last edited by Huertecilla; 10th April 2019 at 14:31.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  31. #331
    Master thieuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    GMT+1
    Posts
    6,697
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Integrale View Post
    Porsche offer reduced labour charges for classics. They want to draw the work back in. Routine work on mine is not much more than the recognised independents. Ask the question.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using TZ-UK mobile app
    True, same here: -/- 20% for labour and fixed prices for certain jobs. The moment you want something additionally being done to your Porsche is the moment the meter starts running. Let's face it: Porsche parts are expensive and some jobs are really labour (money) consuming due to the design of the car.

    Menno

  32. #332
    Master
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    By the TOLL Road
    Posts
    3,259
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Huertecilla View Post
    Don´t forget the ATS A-style.
    Optional OEM for Volvos, Opels p.e. those days. And DAF ofcourse







    Seen a Rover P5B with correct Dunlop A looked awesome.

  33. #333
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,174
    Quote Originally Posted by Incredible Sulk View Post
    Is he still going? I remember him as being middle aged back in the early 90's when he looked after my 944!

    He was a bit of a star though. He was always around the railway arch at the weekends, which was handy as mine always seemed to develop faults on Sundays.
    Yep, going strong! His office in the arch remains an Aladdin's Cave of Porsche bits, workshop manuals, technical bulletins and other treasure. He's got a good team of mechanics there too, and he seems to be a go-to guy for the front-engined cars generally. they were working on a 924 Turbo when I dropped mine off last week.

  34. #334
    Craftsman Alex L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire - UK
    Posts
    901
    Quote Originally Posted by Thewatchbloke View Post
    My local Porsche main dealer in Reading (the UK head office) was reported as charging £234 per hour back in 2017 and won the title of the most expensive labour rate in the UK.
    It's not changed much but meant my Boxster (which is under Porsche Warranty) service came to ~£1800 in December!

  35. #335




    I do like Minis bottom one is me and John Cooper 1984 the Mini was my 1965 Mini Cooper with shorrork Supercharger.
    Top photo out side me Mams house all my Minis.

  36. #336
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Die Fuchsröhre
    Posts
    13,693
    A friend of mine is the official importer of Watanabe wheels into the UK. As he says on his website (https://www.retroracecar.com/) he "shaved close to 30kg off MGB no.83 by fitting four 14” x 5.5” RS Watanabe magnesium wheels (at 3.7Kg per rim) versus the competition wire wheel set up."
    You can live in your car but you can't drive your house.

  37. #337
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Die Fuchsröhre
    Posts
    13,693
    Here's an older magnesium wheel I saw at the weekend:

    You can live in your car but you can't drive your house.

  38. #338
    Grand Master Chris_in_the_UK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Norf Yorks
    Posts
    35,932
    Quote Originally Posted by Foxy100 View Post
    A friend of mine is the official importer of Watanabe wheels into the UK. As he says on his website (https://www.retroracecar.com/) he "shaved close to 30kg off MGB no.83 by fitting four 14” x 5.5” RS Watanabe magnesium wheels (at 3.7Kg per rim) versus the competition wire wheel set up."
    Serious reduction in unsprung weight!.
    When you look long into an abyss, the abyss looks long into you.........

  39. #339
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Die Fuchsröhre
    Posts
    13,693
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_in_the_UK View Post
    Serious reduction in unsprung weight!.
    He offered me a set of the magnesium wheels for my MX-5 for £2k but it lives outside and I wouldn't feel comfortable with that kind of value wheels on display! Plus the car only cost me £1,600. Still, I may lose my mind one day and realise it's too good an idea to pass on.
    You can live in your car but you can't drive your house.

  40. #340
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Southern Spain
    Posts
    23,170
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Foxy100 View Post
    He offered me a set of the magnesium wheels for my MX-5 for £2k but it lives outside and I wouldn't feel comfortable with that kind of value wheels on display! Plus the car only cost me £1,600. Still, I may lose my mind one day and realise it's too good an idea to pass on.
    A set of forged/spun aluminium alloy rims weighs about the same as cast magnesium and is a lot tougher at just about half the price.

    About the brittle myth: The problem with magnesium was inpurities and creep along those when the surface protection was damaged. A good mag alloy without impurities is even corrosion resistant itself as the surface will be a hard magnesium oxide protecting the material from further decay. To make the wheel more high spee corrosion (fire) resistant, they are sealed with a coat of enamel/paint.
    Modern made mags. are both creep resistant and very well surface protected.
    It should be clear that magnesium wheels are a bit more expensive to produce than aluminium ones.

    That said, weight reduction on the rims is só worth it.

    That MGB; 7,5 kilos per wheel?? WOW!! Totally credible btw as 10-11 kilos for a heavy duty wheel is heavy but not extreme. If you weigh an extra strong wire wheel it is horryfying.

    As older cars tend to be lót lighter than prsent day ones, the reduction in wheel weight is that much more noticeable. Same goes with respect to the horse power.

    Both RAYS and ENKEI produce retro rims in vintage designs but are modern production method light/strong.

    Those D-types are eye candy btw.!!
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  41. #341
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Southern Spain
    Posts
    23,170
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Foxy100 View Post
    Here's an older magnesium wheel I saw at the weekend:
    Uffff; seriously light rims and then Korean Gladial rubber around them. Hmmm.
    The rubber is the begin and end all of contact with the road and as such the limits of all driving.
    Especially on classics, usually not doing lots of annual mileage, money on good rubber is very well spent.
    When the going gets tough, the DAF gets going.

  42. #342
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    22,591
    Quote Originally Posted by Integrale View Post
    Porsche offer reduced labour charges for classics. They want to draw the work back in. Routine work on mine is not much more than the recognised independents. Ask the question.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using TZ-UK mobile app

    If you get an oil change with Porsche, you can join the Classic Porsche register. Which this comes 12 free magazines, discounts on parts, key ring , number plate holders, 4 complementary car washes and vacuums a year (plus access to to the OPC stock of free coffee and buns ). The oil change is about £350,so pretty high, but at least you will get the correct oil for your car and not some Synthetic oil which isn't suitable.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  43. #343
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    22,591
    On the topic of wheels. The best I ever saw where made by Campagnolo in a special alloy called Elekton. They were not only OEM on most Lambo, but were also used by Arbarth. A friend had 15" Campagnolo Arbath wheels (fitted with Pirelli Corsas) and they weighted less that a standard 13" rim and normal tyre. This was on his 1600cc Lancia powered Fiat Panda.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  44. #344
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Die Fuchsröhre
    Posts
    13,693
    Quote Originally Posted by Huertecilla View Post
    A set of forged/spun aluminium alloy rims weighs about the same as cast magnesium and is a lot tougher at just about half the price.

    About the brittle myth: The problem with magnesium was inpurities and creep along those when the surface protection was damaged. A good mag alloy without impurities is even corrosion resistant itself as the surface will be a hard magnesium oxide protecting the material from further decay. To make the wheel more high spee corrosion (fire) resistant, they are sealed with a coat of enamel/paint.
    Modern made mags. are both creep resistant and very well surface protected.
    It should be clear that magnesium wheels are a bit more expensive to produce than aluminium ones.

    That said, weight reduction on the rims is só worth it.

    That MGB; 7,5 kilos per wheel?? WOW!! Totally credible btw as 10-11 kilos for a heavy duty wheel is heavy but not extreme. If you weigh an extra strong wire wheel it is horryfying.

    As older cars tend to be lót lighter than prsent day ones, the reduction in wheel weight is that much more noticeable. Same goes with respect to the horse power.

    Both RAYS and ENKEI produce retro rims in vintage designs but are modern production method light/strong.

    Those D-types are eye candy btw.!!
    He had been running the 72-spoke racing wire wheels, which must be 11 or 12kg per corner. I had those on my car, I think my new alloys are 10kg, which isn't a massive weight loss but on Healeys you're a bit stuck for choice, and a set of the Watanabe just wouldn't look right.
    You can live in your car but you can't drive your house.

  45. #345
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Berkshire UK
    Posts
    6,405
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff wilson View Post


    I do like Minis bottom one is me and John Cooper 1984 the Mini was my 1965 Mini Cooper with shorrork Supercharger.
    Top photo out side me Mams house all my Minis.
    Nice collection, I had a few back in the day! What's the story with LBR 810 T? A quick search tells me it's a 1966 Morris Mini that was first registered in 1978 (the external hinge shell confused me!) but it also appears to have roll up windows with quarterlights?

  46. #346
    Master
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    By the TOLL Road
    Posts
    3,259
    Blog Entries
    1
    Anyone out to a Classic Car show in this lovely weather, if so let’s see some pictures next week.

    We are going to a first time show on Monday at Chetwynd Deer Park Newport Shropshire, should be a fantastic day

  47. #347
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ashford, Kent
    Posts
    17,498

    Classic Cars what do you have

    The important point is the sequence:
    Your initial post on the matter:

    Quote Originally Posted by Andyg View Post
    Lovely weather here in the UK today, so a perfect opportunity to get the Pork out and take it for a spin.
    Now for every one I know - and most people in this debate - “taking for a spin” doesn’t mean pushing it out of the garage; it doesn’t mean starting it and going forward 4 or 5 metres on the driveway. It means taking on the road.
    As we like facts on TZ-UK: http://onlineslangdictionary.com/mea...ake-for-a-spin

    But you also confirmed this, as, after hilly10’s reply to your post:

    Quote Originally Posted by hilly10 View Post
    Same here Andy got the TR out and went to watch the first Sprint warm up meeting at Curbrough Lichfield
    You replied, quoting him:

    Quote Originally Posted by Andyg View Post
    Nice. The roads however seemed packed with old men, wearing leathers, riding very large and noisy motorcycles - slowly
    Now 24 March was a Sunday. Which ties the 3 together nicely.

    So wriggle all you want my little worm: you took your car on the road as it was SORN.

    You’re fine, you weren’t caught. Good for you.

    But you need to practice on your alibi because if you had presented your defence in court instead of a watch forum...
    Last edited by Saint-Just; 11th May 2019 at 20:53.
    Don't take my silence for agreement. I've just realised you're too stupid to argue with.

  48. #348
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    22,591
    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    The important point is the sequence:
    Your initial post on the matter:



    Now for every one I know - and most people in this debate - “taking for a spin” doesn’t mean pushing it out of the garage; it doesn’t mean starting it and going forward 4 or 5 metres on the driveway. It means taking on the road.
    As we like facts on TZ-UK: http://onlineslangdictionary.com/mea...ake-for-a-spin

    But you also confirmed this, as, after hilly10’s reply to your post:



    You replied, quoting him:



    Now 24 March was a Sunday. Which ties the 3 together nicely.

    So wriggle all you want my little worm: you took your car on the road as it was SORN.

    You’re fine, you weren’t caught. Good for you.

    But you need to practice on your alibi because if you had presented your defence in court instead of a watch forum...
    Already done to death in the BP (in more than one threads) but well done for bringing it back to life.

    On the morning of the 24th March I drove my Mercedes E350 to my golf club, where I practiced (as I did today). The practice ground happens to be next to the Ring Road, so I heard and saw lots of big VTwins cruising the road, mostly ridden by old men in leather - the open face lids is very much on trend for the Harley boys.

    On completion of my practice I returned home for a spot of lunch, then decided to DRIVE (not push) my 964 out of the garage (after being put to bed in Nov) to give it a spring clean, fit the refurbished Spoiler (which previously lead to a couple of PM with Backward Point) and run it up and down my drive - just to check levels, make sure the oil got nice and hot, check brakes were not binding, clutch/gears were OK, nothing had fallen off, etc.

    I am sorry this doesnt qualify as a "spin", and agree that "pre-flight checks", "a Spring shake down" or "a saunter round the drive", might have been more appropriate in this case, but I used "spin". Shoot me. But to be honest I never thought that Creepy Ralphy would take it upon himself to perform a SORN test of MY car, or that his information should create such interest to be honest. If I had I would have been more descriptive in my post.

    I did not however take it on public roads because it's wasn't on SORN. That would be illegal and would place huge risks on me and my car, etc. That actually is a fact!

    But if you have any evidence that I am trying to "wriggle" by all means, post it. I have nothing to hide.

    Better still why not keep your petty, snide and untruthful allegations to the BP and spare the rest of the forum of your personal vendetta. It's boring and unnecessary, especially as you have ZERO evidence to substainate your allegation.

    But just for everyone's information the Car came off SORN in May, so if you happen to see it on public roads be assured it's all legal - taxed, insured and MOT'ed.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  49. #349
    Master PreacherCain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    2,174
    I thought I'd better circle back and let the assembled multitude know the damage for the 928's work: £2,700.

    Actually, in all honesty I'm not too upset given all the work that's been done - big service with all the usual bits and belts, the transmission's been serviced, both rear calipers stripped, split and sorted out (the steel plates were lifting due to Al corrosion, so the pads were binding and really not doing their jobs properly) and the intake manifold lifted to deal with a coolant leak, and various seals, rubbers and gaskets replaced while it was off.

    Sorting out the binding brakes has made a huge difference to the drive and I'm just waiting for a sunny, quiet weekend to give it a proper thrash now. If anyone else is going to "Purely Porsche" at Beaulieu next month, look for a scabby dark blue S4 on the 928UK stand...

  50. #350
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Die Fuchsröhre
    Posts
    13,693
    Nah, can't be bothered!
    Last edited by Foxy100; 13th May 2019 at 13:41.
    You can live in your car but you can't drive your house.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •