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Thread: Advice from Motorcycle riders - glove related

  1. #1
    Master
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    Advice from Motorcycle riders - glove related

    Hi All,

    I am looking for some heated gloves/a solution for my son. He has recently started riding a 125cc bike for getting about and is telling me his hands are freezing. He has decent gloves (albeit I donít think they are winter gloves) and also has some silk glove liners but apparently his hands are still freezing.

    So can those amongst you in the know give me any suggestions of better gloves or heated gloves. I have had a look online but they seem expensive and it is difficult to know what is worth buying and what isnít.

    Thanks!


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  2. #2
    Master Red Steve's Avatar
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    Google Lobster Claw gloves. They aren't heated but are about the warmest Winter gloves I've used in the past 30 years.

    Sent from my SM-T800 using TZ-UK mobile app

  3. #3
    What he wants is handlebar muffs.
    Coupled with heated grips your hands get so hot that you have to remove them and cool them off in the airstream after a while..

  4. #4
    Master
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    Gerbing or Keis, only ones to go for really, but not cheap. I use Rukka with some silk liners.

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  5. #5
    Muffs and oxford heated grips means he can continue to use his thinner g,over and retain a better feel for the controls IMO

  6. #6
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommyboy View Post
    Muffs and oxford heated grips means he can continue to use his thinner g,over and retain a better feel for the controls IMO
    Good shout actually, if hes commuting this is a top idea.

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  7. #7
    Master Reeny's Avatar
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    I had heated grips on one of my bikes and the palm of my hand was red hot, while the back of my hand was freezing.
    I was glad when it broke.
    My brothers old belstaff wax cotton overmitts from 1978 get used all the time in winter now.
    Thin(ish) summer gloves inside a toasty waterproof mitten.
    It's all I need, along with at least 3 layers of clothing.

  8. #8
    Heated grips and hand guards/muffs are the easiest to use option and not expensive if you fit yourself. Decent winter gloves can be had for £35 and up as well.

  9. #9
    Master blackal's Avatar
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    Donít go for ever-thicker gloves. Go down the route of muffs and heated grips (if the alternator on his bike will actually support the load).

    The throttle on those bikes is like a switch - thick gloves with no feel are a liability.

    And tell him to ride slower.......

  10. #10
    Craftsman
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    I am with the muffs crowd here.

    I commuted through 5 winters on my 125 VanVan ( brilliant for the job) and bought some neoprene handlebar muffs and just used a pair of waterproof bike gloves, not summer weight but also not thick winter ones. I never needed heated grips and regardless of the temperature this combination worked well. Good feel on the controls and comfortable.
    One thing that made a difference was always wearing waterproofs over the leathers.

  11. #11
    Master
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    Hadnít thought about muffs or heated grips, will check that out.

    I would have thought (what with all the technological advancements in the world!) that there might be some special space age gloves that are both light and warm....... might just be wishful thinking though!!


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  12. #12
    The key thing here is getting your hands out of the wind blast.
    I fly a paramotor which could be likened to a moped in the sky and I used to suffer from chronic cold hand syndrome in the winter until I made a neoprene hand muff to shield my hands from the icy air at altitude.

  13. #13
    Master Reeny's Avatar
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    Try the muffs on their own first.
    They look odd, but will be warmer than overmitts, which are ok on straight roads, but can be clumsy in towns.
    Grips heat up the part of your hand which is warm already.

  14. #14
    Iíd say Muffs (and heated grips if still needed). Then make sure he continues to use proper hard-armoured gloves, rather than making a trade off on proper protection for insulation. He wants A-stars SuperTechs or something of that nature. Hands are important!

  15. #15
    Master wileeeeeey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emgee View Post
    Gerbing or Keis, only ones to go for really, but not cheap. I use Rukka with some silk liners.

    Sent from my SM-G960F using TZ-UK mobile app
    +1

    Heated grips and a good pair of Rukka gloves. Nothing else needed.

    If unbelievably cold you could install Barkbusters as well but heated gloves are utter utter overkill.

  16. #16
    Master
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    Most cold is from wind chill,muffs are a very good idea.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Steve View Post
    Google Lobster Claw gloves. They aren't heated but are about the warmest Winter gloves I've used in the past 30 years.

    Sent from my SM-T800 using TZ-UK mobile app
    Try these - theyíre really very good. Iíve been riding for thirty-five years and havenít come across any warmer gloves. Itís the design that does it - apparently less surface area to get cold (or something technical like that). Cheaper and less of a faff than heated grips and/or muffs.

    For shorter journeys (about half an hour or so) he wonít need anything more.

    They do look strange though and he wonít wear them if heís fashion-conscious!

  18. #18
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reeny View Post
    Try the muffs on their own first.
    They look odd, but will be warmer than overmitts, which are ok on straight roads, but can be clumsy in towns.
    Grips heat up the part of your hand which is warm already.
    Absolutely this. No need for heated grips (which could be too hard on the alternator of a 125 anyway), the gloves he has will be perfect with muffs.
    Well, everybody in Casablanca has problems. Yours may work out.

  19. #19
    Master
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    As always chaps thanks for the great advice, I will go check some of these options out!


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  20. #20
    Any modernish 125's alternator will easily be able to handle the ~ 30 watts of heated grips.

  21. #21
    Lots of recommendations for muffs. I tried them once a long while ago when I was commuting on an R6 but the wind blast kept blowing them backwards into the brake / clutch levers so I gave up on them. Perhaps the modern ones are better designed.

    Don't retro fitted heated grips bulk up the grips too much? Never tried them.

    Thankfully, I almost never have to ride in the cold anymore, but I do have some lobster claw gloves & they really did work without needing to be overly bulky.
    Andy

  22. #22
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    The above is correct too. I had gone round the problem by fitting first motocross handguards.
    Well, everybody in Casablanca has problems. Yours may work out.

  23. #23
    Master blackal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy tims View Post
    Lots of recommendations for muffs. I tried them once a long while ago when I was commuting on an R6 but the wind blast kept blowing them backwards into the brake / clutch levers so I gave up on them. Perhaps the modern ones are better designed.

    Don't retro fitted heated grips bulk up the grips too much? Never tried them.

    Thankfully, I almost never have to ride in the cold anymore, but I do have some lobster claw gloves & they really did work without needing to be overly bulky.
    Not sure how much air pressure you get on a 125 - but a valid generalism (is that a word??)

  24. #24
    Master
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    Anyone have any specific suggestions/links to lobster claw gloves and handlebar muffs etc? There seem to be a lot available and I have no idea what constitutes good.


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  25. #25
    Master W124's Avatar
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    The original, and best crab-claw gloves were Hein-Gericke Pathan - they have been out of production for about 5 years since H-G first went bust.

    I have had mine for more like 8-10 years, and they are still in great shape - they do occasionally come up on eBay as NoS.

    I have seen a crab-claw glove by Belstaff, but IMHO most of their motorcycle gear is pretty poor.

  26. #26
    Don't retro fitted heated grips bulk up the grips too much? Never tried them.

    Thankfully, I almost never have to ride in the cold anymore, but I do have some lobster claw gloves & they really did work without needing to be overly bulky.[/QUOTE]

    Heated grips are no thicker than normal ones. Personally I find them great. I had one fail on my GS in Dec and the difference between my hands was REALLy noticeable, with one numb from cold after 30 mins. Luckily an easy fix!

  27. #27
    Craftsman Tifa's Avatar
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    How far is he riding?
    If it's less than 50 miles or so, go for decent winter gloves.
    A good set should easily keep you comfortable over that distance.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt8500 View Post
    Don't retro fitted heated grips bulk up the grips too much? Never tried them.

    Thankfully, I almost never have to ride in the cold anymore, but I do have some lobster claw gloves & they really did work without needing to be overly bulky.
    Heated grips are no thicker than normal ones. Personally I find them great. I had one fail on my GS in Dec and the difference between my hands was REALLy noticeable, with one numb from cold after 30 mins. Luckily an easy fix![/QUOTE]

    Sorry, I was thinking of the grips you wrap round the existing grips like these

    https://www.motocard.com/en/grips/ox...EaAs__EALw_wcB
    Andy

  29. #29
    Master Red Steve's Avatar
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    I've got a spare pair of Hein Gericke "Lobster Claw" gloves. I bought two pairs when I found out that the company were going into liquidation in the UK as I've had loads of their gear in the past which was always superb quality and great value for money too.

    I'd be happy to post them to you for your son to try and see how he gets on with them. As a few others have testified they do work really well and could save you from going to the expense of heated grips/gloves etc. If he likes them and they work, then he can keep them for say £30 of which I'd put a tenner into the fundraiser.

    If he doesn't like them simply pop them back in the post to me, and I'll bung them back with all my other kit. They are a size large.

    20190115_131855 (2) by Steve Bolt, on Flickr

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by E_2_Right-Force View Post
    What he wants is handlebar muffs.
    Coupled with heated grips your hands get so hot that you have to remove them and cool them off in the airstream after a while..
    I concur I have commuted for the past 24 winters, handle bar muffs, heated grips and rukka appolo gloves.
    Never feel the cold even at -4 c

  31. #31
    Itís a problem worth sorting- if heís cold and uncomfortable, he wonít be concentrating on the road...

  32. #32
    Master Red Steve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by W124 View Post
    The original, and best crab-claw gloves were Hein-Gericke Pathan - they have been out of production for about 5 years since H-G first went bust.

    I have had mine for more like 8-10 years, and they are still in great shape - they do occasionally come up on eBay as NoS.

    I have seen a crab-claw glove by Belstaff, but IMHO most of their motorcycle gear is pretty poor.
    Exactly, hence buying a couple of pairs just before the store in Bristol closed

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  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Steve View Post
    I've got a spare pair of Hein Gericke "Lobster Claw" gloves.
    Those are what I have. Good aren't they?
    Andy

  34. #34
    Damn, I didnít even realise HG had gone bust. Shows how often I buy new kit!

    Whatever he gets, make sure it has decent retention. God forbid he bins it, but nothing worse than going down with no gloves on. Over the years Iíve favoured a decent tensionable wrist strap, cinch it down and thereís no way those gloves are coming off.

  35. #35
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Steve View Post
    I've got a spare pair of Hein Gericke "Lobster Claw" gloves. I bought two pairs when I found out that the company were going into liquidation in the UK as I've had loads of their gear in the past which was always superb quality and great value for money too.

    I'd be happy to post them to you for your son to try and see how he gets on with them. As a few others have testified they do work really well and could save you from going to the expense of heated grips/gloves etc. If he likes them and they work, then he can keep them for say £30 of which I'd put a tenner into the fundraiser.

    If he doesn't like them simply pop them back in the post to me, and I'll bung them back with all my other kit. They are a size large.

    20190115_131855 (2) by Steve Bolt, on Flickr
    Thatís very kind mate, I will drop you a pm.

    Thanks!


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  36. #36
    Grand Master hogthrob's Avatar
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    Aren't handlebar muffs for uncool old guys, and not for trendy young geezers? Some youths even go out without a coat, because it looks cool.

  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by hogthrob View Post
    Aren't handlebar muffs for uncool old guys
    Hey!
    I resemble that remark.


    I was going to mention earlier - muffs are deffo not for the hipsters, any street-cred earnt from the check shirts, tatts and bubble-visored retro skid lid whilst posing on a CX500 `cafe racer` would immediately be eradicated.
    But then, hipsters only ride to the local beard oil shop and back, don`t they?

  38. #38
    Journeyman
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    When it's really cold I'll use these muffs, they fit really well and don't move around, or interfere with the controls.
    They fit onto the bar end nice and secure.
    https://www.urbanrider.co.uk/brands/...saAudqEALw_wcB

    I also use these https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/mot...MaAj8REALw_wcB

    They are very warm yet quite thin, loads of feeling to use the controls unlike some other thick and clumsy things I've used before.

    I also have heated grips.

    My advice, buy the muffs, cheapest and easiest option se how he gets on, then fit the heated grips, and if you're feeling really flush get the gloves too.
    With all three , you can ride in some absolutely appalling weather with warm and dry hands.

  39. #39
    Master
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    I use Barkbuster "Blizzard" muffs , but they are not full muffs they are like full covers , but you can see your fingers and so you don't have to fumble for the clutch / brake

    They are not cheap see here Amazon link £80

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/BARKBUSTERS.../dp/B00MXWZVBG

    However I left them on my GS all year round as they allow me to wear non waterproof gloves as they shield all the wind and rain.

    I would definitely take up the offer of the lobster claws kindly offered above as the whole concept of grouping fingers together makes a much warmer glove, hence the refs to army miss above.

    Steve

  40. #40
    Master
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    In my winter commuting days (journey time around 40mins) all I ever needed was muffs and gloves.

  41. #41
    As others have said muffs are great although not very fashionable if that is important. Keiss heated grips are very discreet - control is a little push button on each grip.

    The best heated grips I ever had - although I would warn against them - were brass slugs that needed a switch wiring up. I was sent them by a Norwegian friend and they were for snowmobiles - were actually too hot ! Can't remember the brand but had a picture of a parrot on them.

  42. #42
    Master thorpey69's Avatar
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    We sell the RST heated gloves (rechargeable lithium batteries) and they seem popular and well thought of by those who have purchased them and ride all year round,obviously muffs do deflect the wind chill but having a warming source anywhere on your body,be it gloves,heated vest,jacket etc does help to raise the entire bodies temperature and make the overall winter riding experience more pleasant.

  43. #43
    Master
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    Thanks for all the advice chaps!

    I want to give a big public ĎThanksí to Red Steve. He sent over a pair of his lobster claw gloves Ďon specí and they work wonders. My lad now has toasty hands and is much happier/safer. Very kind gesture and a reminder of what makes these forums special!


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  44. #44
    Master
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    Iím for heated grips, you donít need to remember anything and you keep the sensitivity. Silk inner gloves work well too.

  45. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by zanderpants View Post
    Thanks for all the advice chaps!

    I want to give a big public ĎThanksí to Red Steve. He sent over a pair of his lobster claw gloves Ďon specí and they work wonders. My lad now has toasty hands and is much happier/safer. Very kind gesture and a reminder of what makes these forums special!


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    A kind gesture indeed!

    I did say those gloves were amazing. You really donít need anything more unless you are riding for hours in freezing conditions.

  46. #46
    Master Red Steve's Avatar
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    Thanks for your kind words Alex. I'm glad they worked out. Nothing worse than cold hands when riding.

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