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Thread: The recipe thread

  1. #351

    Re: The recipe thread

    I used Jon's Beef Madras recipe yesterday and it was absolutely fantastic. Thanks Jon.

    I'll have to post one of my own as soon as I get the chance.

  2. #352

    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by mackered
    Italian sausage ball rigatoni

    1 pck Sainsburys Sicilian sausage (taste the difference)
    Rigatoni pasta
    Parmesan Reggiano
    1 to 2 chilli's
    1 1/2 tins Napolina chopped tomatoes
    A little red wine, rioja etc.
    Large handful of mushrooms
    1 to 2 cloves garlic

    Dry mix:
    Oregano
    Basil
    Paprika
    Very coarse cracked black pepper

    De-skin the sausages and make three balls from each sausage. You MUST use the sicilian sausages from sainsbo's, I've tried other herby or italian sausages but non taste as good as these.

    Coat a chopping board with paprika, then basil, oregano and lots (and i mean lots) of coarse cracked black pepper. Turn your mill so you get large chunks.



    Roll each ball until it is completely covered in the dry mix. Carefully add the balls in to a pan with hot olive oil ( I use a large wok for this recipe) and fry them off, turning with tongs or give em a light toss. After they brown up a little (and the oil will have lots of the dry mix in) throw in the garlic to fry. As soon as the garlic starts to fry add the chilli's and chopped tomatoes and gently mix with a wooden spoon, season with a little salt. After about 5 mins I throw in some mushrooms, closed cup, cut in to no more than 2 or 3 pieces. Sometimes I like to soak mine in red wine and a bit more garlic at the beginning but not for too long as i like a bit of bite to them. You can add sweet peppers, small pomodoro tomatoes or both. Cook for about another twenty mins on a low heat. With about 5 mins to go add a little red wine and a good handful of grated parmesan cheese to the sauce.





    Boil up your rigatoni, serve with more parmesan with a good chunk of bread & wine

    This was great

  3. #353

    Re: The recipe thread

    Adzuki Bean and Rice Salad

    100 grams of Adzuki beans
    75 grams of brown rice

    Soak the beans over night in cold water and then boil for 20-30 minutes and then let cool
    Cook the brown rice and let cool

    I then just use a variety of veg and spice and mix it all together but this is what we had last night

    1 Carrot grated
    1 Broccolli head blanched for a couple minutes and let it cool then cut into florets
    1 Red onion
    6 Cherry tomatoes
    4 Spring onions

    Mix all this into the cooled beans and rice and dress

    I usually make a dressing up of

    Soy sauce
    Lemon juice
    Fresh ginger
    Fresh garlic
    Orange juice (less than the lemon)
    Chilli

    Garnish with coriander

  4. #354

    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by pezavez
    Quote Originally Posted by mackered
    Italian sausage ball rigatoni

    1 pck Sainsburys Sicilian sausage (taste the difference)
    Rigatoni pasta
    Parmesan Reggiano
    1 to 2 chilli's
    1 1/2 tins Napolina chopped tomatoes
    A little red wine, rioja etc.
    Large handful of mushrooms
    1 to 2 cloves garlic

    Dry mix:
    Oregano
    Basil
    Paprika
    Very coarse cracked black pepper

    De-skin the sausages and make three balls from each sausage. You MUST use the sicilian sausages from sainsbo's, I've tried other herby or italian sausages but non taste as good as these.

    Coat a chopping board with paprika, then basil, oregano and lots (and i mean lots) of coarse cracked black pepper. Turn your mill so you get large chunks.



    Roll each ball until it is completely covered in the dry mix. Carefully add the balls in to a pan with hot olive oil ( I use a large wok for this recipe) and fry them off, turning with tongs or give em a light toss. After they brown up a little (and the oil will have lots of the dry mix in) throw in the garlic to fry. As soon as the garlic starts to fry add the chilli's and chopped tomatoes and gently mix with a wooden spoon, season with a little salt. After about 5 mins I throw in some mushrooms, closed cup, cut in to no more than 2 or 3 pieces. Sometimes I like to soak mine in red wine and a bit more garlic at the beginning but not for too long as i like a bit of bite to them. You can add sweet peppers, small pomodoro tomatoes or both. Cook for about another twenty mins on a low heat. With about 5 mins to go add a little red wine and a good handful of grated parmesan cheese to the sauce.





    Boil up your rigatoni, serve with more parmesan with a good chunk of bread & wine

    This was great

    May try this over the weekend!

  5. #355

    Re: The recipe thread

    That Italian sausage ball rigatoni will be tested soon, sounds great!

  6. #356

    Re: The recipe thread

    Chicken Zorba, a greek dish we have been eating for a long time.

    For 2:


    Marinade:
    2 tsp Cumin Power,
    1 tsp Corriander Powder,
    1/2 tsp Tumeric,
    Either a little handful of finely chopped fresh mint or about 1/3 tsp dry mint
    Enough Lime Juice to make a thin paste (fresh is best but bottle is fine)

    Chop 2 chicken breasts into slices and place in the marinade for 1hr or more

    Fry the chicken in a little olive oil and serve in pitta bread with houmous, greek natural yoghurt and some nice fresh salad (I try to make a chopped mix of red onion, pepper and tomato as well as lettuce)

    Really easy, not much time in the kitchen to make it and very tasty.

  7. #357

    Re: The recipe thread

    sounds good

  8. #358
    Master zelig's Avatar
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    The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by sibeer
    Chicken Zorba, a greek dish we have been eating for a long time.

    For 2:


    Marinade:
    2 tsp Cumin Power,
    1 tsp Corriander Powder,
    1/2 tsp Tumeric,
    Either a little handful of finely chopped fresh mint or about 1/3 tsp dry mint
    Enough Lime Juice to make a thin paste (fresh is best but bottle is fine)

    Chop 2 chicken breasts into slices and place in the marinade for 1hr or more

    Fry the chicken in a little olive oil and serve in pitta bread with houmous, greek natural yoghurt and some nice fresh salad (I try to make a chopped mix of red onion, pepper and tomato as well as lettuce)

    Really easy, not much time in the kitchen to make it and very tasty.
    That sounds exactly my kind of thing.
    Will be making that soon.

    z

  9. #359

    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by zelig
    Quote Originally Posted by sibeer
    Chicken Zorba, a greek dish we have been eating for a long time.

    For 2:


    Marinade:
    2 tsp Cumin Power,
    1 tsp Corriander Powder,
    1/2 tsp Tumeric,
    Either a little handful of finely chopped fresh mint or about 1/3 tsp dry mint
    Enough Lime Juice to make a thin paste (fresh is best but bottle is fine)

    Chop 2 chicken breasts into slices and place in the marinade for 1hr or more

    Fry the chicken in a little olive oil and serve in pitta bread with houmous, greek natural yoghurt and some nice fresh salad (I try to make a chopped mix of red onion, pepper and tomato as well as lettuce)

    Really easy, not much time in the kitchen to make it and very tasty.
    That sounds exactly my kind of thing.
    Will be making that soon.

    z
    Should have taken some photos when I made it Monday night :(

    Last night's omelette with baked beans after the gym doesn't really warrant a recipe.

  10. #360
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    Easy mushroom risotto

    I stole this from the Independent's website from the article 'Top ten easiest meals for students (or anyone else for that matter) to cook'. It's very easy to make and very tasty served with some garlic bread. It says it serves 4 but there's only just enough for 2.

    Risotto is surprisingly easy to make. Here’s a recipe for a tasty mushroom risotto to serve four people. You can always vary the ingredients, experimenting with the likes of chicken, prawns or other veg:

    Chop an onion and mushrooms and crush one clove of garlic.
    Melt some butter in a saucepan over medium heat and add the onion, cooking until soft.
    Add the mushrooms and garlic and turn up the heat a bit, cooking for another two minutes.
    Tip in 150g of risotto rice. Stir and cook for two to three minutes.
    Pour in 600 ml of vegetable stock and stir until the liquid has evaporated.
    Remove from heat, add salt and pepper and sprinkle some parmesan on top.

  11. #361
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Kenney
    I thought I'd posted this in here at the time of making it but seems not.

    Thought some of you may fing it of interest.

    Just so we are clear here, I’m no chef, so we’re not talking restaurant level stuff here, just the basics.
    All the ingredients you see in the pictures are readily available in the supermarkets. One thing I did struggle with was salmon and/or trout roe, so substituted it with lumpfish caviar, but didn’t use it in the end.

    Rice wine vinegar, sesame oil & mirin to optionally season the rice. Soy sauce as a dip, wasabi paste (green horse radish) & pickled ginger for additional flavours.


    Fresh ingredients are - carrot, cucumber, spring onion, chilli & mushrooms. Ginger, lettuce and lemon were used for flavouring and/or decoration.


    The seafood used was - salmon, mackeral, tuna & talapia. Any fish can be used, it all depends on your preference.


    First thing that you need to do is prep the rice.


    Soak it for a good 30 minutes to remove the excess starch


    Boil until the rice is soft to the touch


    Drain the rice off and either leave to cool to room temperature or do as I do and run cold water through it to cool it down; this also removes further starch


    Next you need to prep your veg. All this invloves is cleaning, cutting and slicing it into strips. Don't go too thick as your sushi rolls will be too big. 5mm thickness should do it




    The mushrooms are sliced and sauted with olive oil and sesame oil with cracked black pepper and left to cool




    Next up is to prep the fish

    The makeral takes the most patience as it is a frigile fish and needs a lot of bones removing. Your fish monger will do it for you if you are not confident enough. So, bones out and skin off


    Salmon is just skin off and slice up




    The tuna and talapia are just a case of slicing to size




    Ok, so thats the lengthy prep work done and all that's required now is to roll it

    Place your mat on a flat hard surface in a landscape position and have a brush and water ready


    Place a sheet of nori (dried seaweed) with its shiny side up on to the mat


    Now spread an even thin layer of rice over the nori, making sure you leave a 15-20mm edge at the top to seal the roll


    Place whatever ingredients you like on the rice at the edge closest to you. Just use three or four at a time



    Brush the top edge with water


    Now pick up the near edge of the mat and start to roll, ensuring nori tucks in as you begin




    There you have your sushi.


    All that is needed now is to cut it up and eat it.


    I also made a couple of cones. That just invloves cutting the nori sheet in half and rolling into a cone



    These are great for parties as they are seen as pretty upmarket stuff but can be made relatively cheap.

    These are how they turned out








    So that's it! I hope this is of some use to you and gives you the confidence to try it, rather than being robbed at the shops for it.

    JK
    This is the best post I've ever seen! Fantastic thanks so much! Will be doing this Tuesday.

  12. #362
    Craftsman Damo8604's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Corned beef hash

    Used this recipe in the army

    1 tin of corned beef
    1 tin of new potatoes
    1 onion
    Salt & pepper to taste

    Chop onion
    Mash potatoes as they are
    Chop corned beef into chunks

    Mash it all together, and put it on the stove till it's hot

    It looks like 5hit, but it tastes bootiful!

  13. #363
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    Re: The recipe thread

    This recipe is very easy... so watch out or you'll be eating pasta all week ;)

    http://www.pbs.org/food/fresh-tastes/cr ... ato-pasta/

  14. #364
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Here's one that I used to make quite often but then kind of forgot about it. Made it again the other night and remembered how much we used to enjoy it. Can't remember where I got the original from but I think I've adapted it a bit since then. It's incredibly quick and easy but has a real wow factor and is fantastically tasty.

    Russian Salad (for two - adjust ingredients to suit number of people or size of their bellies...!)

    Ingredients:
    6 baby new potatoes - quartered
    6 Quail's eggs (Boiled and shelled - see note below) - halved
    1.5 Beetroot (vac packed is easiest) - quartered
    Chopped gherkins (I tend to use about half a dozen baby cornichons chopped into little pieces)
    Celery salt (to taste - not essential but you might as well use it if it's come with your quail's eggs)
    Anchovy ketchup (improvise - I've used a couple of chopped anchovies, a half teaspoon of Gentleman's Relish or a couple of teaspoons of Geo. Watkins Anchovy Ketchup)
    Mayonaisse - enough to soften everything but not too much so it overwhelms
    Caviar on top if you really want to impress (Salmon caviar works best - relatively cheap and the pink colour works better with the colour of the dish as a whole)

    If you are going to boil fresh quail's eggs then make sure you've factored in enough time to shell the bloody things. My idea of purgatory is shelling boiled quail's eggs - it's an absolute nightmare! If you are doing it yourself then soft-boil them and then make sure you plunge them in ice water to stop them cooking any more. The salad is MUCH nicer this way but I've given up on this step and just buy ready boiled quail's eggs from Waitrose now instead!

    Stick the spuds on to boil. About 20 minutes is just right. Can be added to the other ingredients warm or can be cooled first - your choice.

    Once the spuds are ready chuck everything (except the caviar) in a big mixing bowl and stir it all together and serve with the caviar perched on top of the pile. Can also be served alongside a really good strong-tasting fish to give it a bit of extra interest but if you do this I'd recommend chopping everything much finer.

    Nice with a good bread - rye bread is best. A good ice-cold vodka or pink champagne for the full-on Russian effect goes brilliantly with this.

    Prijatnovo appetita!

    Simon

  15. #365
    Master Henrik Gelardi's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Well, Gentlemen, I have read the pages of this thread with a lot of interest. I need to make the curry presented on page 11 (I, think it was), and love the fact that there is so much love for good food around the forums as well.

    I was wondering if any of you have ever heard of SousVide ? It may be a bit less of a recipe, and a bit more of a way to cook. It was made famous quite some time ago by Michelin chefs, but despite it's hefty heritage, it is quite easy. And even more important, it yields michelin results even if you lack skills. In fact, if you put a Michelin chef up agains a rookie who can do what he's told, the rookie will win 9 out of 10 times.

    The discipline is meat. It may be more but for what I intend to focus in, we look at meat. Anyone can cook a steak, but how many can cook a steak to perfection. Now that's an easy answer - No one ! :shock: Nah, of course, our landlord can, but the rest of us...

    When we buy steaks, they are not the same thickness, the pan does not distribute heat evenly, and even more important, even if you cook a steak to perfection (which I will assume is medium rare, for the sake of the argument), it will only be MR in the middle, be a bit more cooked further from the middle, and be very well done at on the outside....

    So, that's the pretext... Now for the solution... SOUSVIDE ! Hear the word, learn the word, taste the word :D :D

    Essentially, it works like this: You vacuum pack the meat and put it into a water bath at the very temperature that you want it to be, e.g. approx 55 degrees celcius for MR. After a certain amount of time, you know that the core temperature is at the 55 degrees desired, and you know it will have had enough. This means that it will have an even color (or "done-ness) through the entire piece of meat, and it will be perfect!!! The outside you do with a blowtorch to give it the look you want and the crust you like...

    Now this sounds a bit more advance than it really is. If (like me) you've spent all accessible cash on watches, there is a smarter way that buying a "WaterOven", which will set you back a lot of money.

    The way to do it, is to buy a PID, use it on your rice cooker, and to begin with use a straw and a bag instead of the vacuum packer, which will set you back about 50 pounds.

    For a full set, expect 150 USD for the PID, and 50 pounds for the vacuum packer - so not to bad, honestly :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    Gentlemen, I bring you my first 3 attempts. Please bear with me as it is picture heavy:

    ATTEMPT ONE: STEAKS (didn't have the vacuum packer at the time):

    Vakuum packed 3 steaks


    In the water bath for 2.5 hours


    Result - notice crust to crust evenness of the color and doneness. These are given their crust with a MoFo creme brûlée burner.



    ATTEMPT TWO: TENDERLOIN (still no vacuum packer - browned on a pan first):

    Browned it for color on a very hot pan first:


    Vacuum packed - I didn't mind all the meat juice I drank with working the straw, but if it'd been chicken.... :shock: :commit:


    Waterbath


    The CUT... Again, notice the even color



    ATTEMPT THREE: BRISKET (Vacuum packer acquired):
    Now this is where it becomes interesting. We daily face a dilemma with meat. The tender cuts are expensive, but have less taste. The tastier cuts are chewy, but cheap. So, we avoid them. Now, cooking sousvide will allow you to take the tougher cuts, and make them a tender. The thing is that you may be able to cook the meats longer this way, and juices and taste won't escape, it won't go dry, and it will preserve taste and pretty much be amazing, and most importantly be so tender you grandparents would have never believed it... :D

    Brisket takes a bit more, and this particular cut had .... 72 hours..... :shock: :shock: :shock: Less might have done it, but I decided on a thursday what was on sundays menu... Just to try it. I do believe less could have done it...

    This is a pretty crap piece of meat...


    Browned on a pan


    Spiced


    Vacuum packer with the goods



    Go sleep for 3 days


    3 days later


    Cutting the bastard



    Again, notice the very even color of this. Tender and taste was +10 !!!

    Well, sorry for the long and picture heavy thread, but thought you might enjoy something a bit different, which may go a bit outside the normal...

    Cheers,
    Henrik

    P.S.
    Further readings:
    Time Magazine
    Wall Street Journal
    Popular Science Magazine
    Wired Magazine

    P.P.S
    Again, sorry for the rant... :)

  16. #366
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Very interesting Henrik, not seen that method before, looks delicious!

    Only thing I'm thinking is the cooking time is obviously very long compared to the hot pan, quick zap in my house!

  17. #367
    Master Henrik Gelardi's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by GraniteQuarry
    Very interesting Henrik, not seen that method before, looks delicious!

    Only thing I'm thinking is the cooking time is obviously very long compared to the hot pan, quick zap in my house!
    I agree David, but this has a different scope to it. Imagine having 8 steaks of uneven thickness to cook to the same doneness. This way you can start them 3 hours ahead, and the result will be perfect across the selection. All you have to do is just quickly add the "crust", but that can also be done beforehand.

    Many steak restaurants actually do this, because it is easy to manage, and results are perfect. But I agree, though, the quick zap is in most cases great, but this is still fun to play around with.

  18. #368
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Good stuff Henrik. I think you have to be very careful with hygiene when cooking sous vide. I believe 60 degrees is the recommended minimum temperature for killing bacteria, and 52 degrees is in the 'danger zone' for bacterial growth!

  19. #369
    Master Henrik Gelardi's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by hogthrob
    Good stuff Henrik. I think you have to be very careful with hygiene when cooking sous vide. I believe 60 degrees is the recommended minimum temperature for killing bacteria, and 52 degrees is in the 'danger zone' for bacterial growth!
    I very much agree, Gordon - my cooking times are based on a table that takes both shape and origin into account, as calculated by sous vide guru Douglas Baldwin, who writes:

    "While there are a lot of different food pathogens that can make you sick, you only need to worry about killing the toughest and most dangerous. The three food pathogens you should worry about when cooking sous vide are the Salmonella species, Listeria monocytogenes, and the pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. Listeria is the hardest to kill but it takes fewer Salmonella or E. coli bacteria to make you sick. Since you don’t know how many pathogens are in your food, most experts recommend that you cook your food to reduce: Listeria by at least a million to one; Salmonella by ten million to one; and E. coli by a hundred thousand to one. You can easily do this when you cook sous vide: you just keep your food in a 130°F (54.4°C) or hotter water bath until enough bacteria have been killed.

    How long does it take for you to reduce, say, Listeria by a million to one? Your water bath temperature is very important: when cooking beef, it’ll take you four times longer at 130°F (54.4°C) as it does at 140°F (60°C). What you are cooking is also important: at 140°F (60°C), it’ll take you about 60% longer for chicken as it does for beef. Other things, like salt and fat content, also affect how long it takes; but these difference are small compared with temperature and species.

    Since sous vide cooking in a water bath is very consistent, I’ve calculated the worst-case cooking times so you don’t have to. My worst-case cooking times are based on the temperature, thickness, and type of the food and will give at least a million to one reduction in Listeria, a ten million to one reduction in Salmonella, and a hundred thousand to one reduction in E. coli:
    "

    His website is the source of information and cook times...

  20. #370
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Not really a recipe because it's rarely made the same way twice but here's a chicken curry I've just made with lentils, potatoes and lots of onions. This will be a milder curry but I'll have some lime pickle with it.



    Here's a side dish of aloo methi which has a bit more heat and fenugreek (methi) leaves.



    Accompanied with peshwari naan and onion salad and there's every chance I'll have a beer.

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  21. #371

    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by GraniteQuarry
    Very interesting Henrik, not seen that method before, looks delicious!

    Only thing I'm thinking is the cooking time is obviously very long compared to the hot pan, quick zap in my house!
    Try this David, it works.

    Once you've bought your steak take it out of the packet and place it on a wire rack set over a tray. Refrigerate for 2 days to let the air circulate around the meat and start to dry it out. This will concentrate the flavour and start to tenderise the meat. When you're ready to cook the steak, take it out of the fridge and allow it to come to room temperature for 2 hours.

    Then when cooking it flip it every 15 seconds and take the tempreture with a probe, I find 38-43 means it's rare

    http://www.channel4.com/4food/recipes/c ... fect-steak

  22. #372

    Re: The recipe thread

    My 2p worth:

    Chicken and dolcelatte pasta.

    You will need:-
    - About 400g chicken, cut into chunks
    - Onion, chopped
    - 2 gloves garlic, crushed
    - 250g dolcelatte cheese
    - 1/2 tub creme freche (can have the half fat version if you like)
    - Pepper
    - Fresh pasta (personally I like twizzles)

    To cook, simply add some olive oil, onion and garlic to a medium pan until soft, then add and brown the chicken. Add the dolcelatte until melted and then add the creme freche and pepper. Now turn the heat down to simmer and leave until the sauce starts to thicken. You will need to stir continuously to make sure it doesn't stick to the pan. Bit painful but worth it.

    When thick, just pop over the fresh pasta and add some more pepper on top to finish it off.

  23. #373
    Grand Master Raffe's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Henrik Gelardi
    The way to do it, is to buy a PID, use it on your rice cooker, and to begin with use a straw and a bag instead of the vacuum packer, which will set you back about 50 pounds.

    For a full set, expect 150 USD for the PID, and 50 pounds for the vacuum packer - so not to bad, honestly :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
    Sensational, Henrik!

    I have been fascinated about this for a long time, always thought I might take a go at it. Now you got me going. My thought was to use an industrial/medical device, they come at a fraction of the cost of proper kitchen Sous-Vide equipment. I am sure the industrial stuff is also much better in accuracy and quality.

    Something like this costs only 265 Euro on Ebay, almost new. http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vie ... 0896520761
    Do you think its too small with 5.7 litres water capacity?

    When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser - probably not Socrates

  24. #374
    Master Henrik Gelardi's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Raffe
    Quote Originally Posted by Henrik Gelardi
    The way to do it, is to buy a PID, use it on your rice cooker, and to begin with use a straw and a bag instead of the vacuum packer, which will set you back about 50 pounds.

    For a full set, expect 150 USD for the PID, and 50 pounds for the vacuum packer - so not to bad, honestly :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
    Sensational, Henrik!

    I have been fascinated about this for a long time, always thought I might take a go at it. Now you got me going. My thought was to use an industrial/medical device, they come at a fraction of the cost of proper kitchen Sous-Vide equipment. I am sure the industrial stuff is also much better in accuracy and quality.

    Something like this costs only 265 Euro on Ebay, almost new. http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vie ... 0896520761
    Do you think its too small with 5.7 litres water capacity?
    Doesnt look half bad, but i think it may be a bit on the small side with only 5.7 liters. Not quite sure on that one, but my solution can be scaled, which I like.

    I'd seriously recommend the PID I got from Auber Instruments in the US - they're a serious player in the temperature controller business, and not to expensive. Since I already had two rice cookers of different sizes, I didn't have to take anything new on board, and all these machines take up a lot of space in the kitchen, so I found that to be a great solution. The Auber PID I got is this one. I also initially looked at this with some enthusiasm :)

    Ricecookers are pretty cheap as well, and can be used for... well... rice, as well :)

    Good luck, Raffe - PM me if you need help.

    Cheers,
    Henrik

  25. #375
    Grand Master Raffe's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    [quote=Henrik Gelardi][quote=Raffe]
    Quote Originally Posted by Henrik Gelardi":2e6fsuzg]
    The way to do it, is to buy a PID, use it on your rice cooker, and to begin with use a straw and a bag instead of the vacuum packer, which will set you back about 50 pounds.

    For a full set, expect 150 USD for the PID, and 50 pounds for the vacuum packer - so not to bad, honestly :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
    [/quote]

    Sensational, Henrik!

    I have been fascinated about this for a long time, always thought I might take a go at it. Now you got me going. My thought was to use an industrial/medical device, they come at a fraction of the cost of proper kitchen Sous-Vide equipment. I am sure the industrial stuff is also much better in accuracy and quality.

    Something like this costs only 265 Euro on Ebay, almost new. [url="http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=180896520761
    http://cgi.ebay.de/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vie ... 0896520761[/url]
    Do you think its too small with 5.7 litres water capacity?
    Doesnt look half bad, but i think it may be a bit on the small side with only 5.7 liters. Not quite sure on that one, but my solution can be scaled, which I like.

    I'd seriously recommend the PID I got from Auber Instruments in the US - they're a serious player in the temperature controller business, and not to expensive. Since I already had two rice cookers of different sizes, I didn't have to take anything new on board, and all these machines take up a lot of space in the kitchen, so I found that to be a great solution. The Auber PID I got is this one.

    Ricecookers are pretty cheap as well, and can be used for... well... rice, as well :)

    Good luck, Raffe - PM me if you need help.

    Cheers,
    Henrik[/quote:2e6fsuzg]

    Bought this one yesterday, 99 Euros! http://www.ebay.de/itm/280774014340

    Will not be able to test it for a few weeks though, as its shipped to my German address but I will be in Sweden for the next couple of weeks. Will sure post some results eventually. :bounce: :bounce:
    When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser - probably not Socrates

  26. #376
    Master Henrik Gelardi's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Raffe
    Bought this one yesterday, 99 Euros! http://www.ebay.de/itm/280774014340

    Will not be able to test it for a few weeks though, as its shipped to my German address but I will be in Sweden for the next couple of weeks. Will sure post some results eventually. :bounce: :bounce:
    Cool Raffe - congrats ! You should consider buying a digital thermometer to confirm the exact cooking temperature - make or break for the success of the project !

  27. #377
    Grand Master Raffe's Avatar
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Henrik Gelardi
    Quote Originally Posted by Raffe
    Bought this one yesterday, 99 Euros! http://www.ebay.de/itm/280774014340

    Will not be able to test it for a few weeks though, as its shipped to my German address but I will be in Sweden for the next couple of weeks. Will sure post some results eventually. :bounce: :bounce:
    Cool Raffe - congrats ! You should consider buying a digital thermometer to confirm the exact cooking temperature - make or break for the success of the project !
    I got a whole armada of digital and analogue cooking thermometers, that's my second passion after watches. :D
    When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser - probably not Socrates

  28. #378

    Italian Marmite Scamble

    The ingredients:

    2 thick slices of focaccia
    2 thick slices of prosciutto or smoked ham
    4 large eggs
    1 clove of garlic
    1 hot green chilli
    A small handful of chopped parsley
    1 pinch of celery salt
    1 pinch of black pepper
    1 smear of marmite
    1 knob of butter

    Rub the focaccia with the peeled garlic and then lightly toast or grill the bread. When golden, spread with marmite and then place the prosciutto on top.

    While the bread is toasting, melt some butter in a pan, add a little garlic, add the finely chopped chilli and whisked eggs. Season to taste with the celery salt and black pepper. Before the eggs set completely, tip them on top of the bread and ham. Garnish with the parsely.

    A marvellous hangover cure this one, especially when accompanied with some V8 or tomato juice and strong black coffee. I timed myself the last time I made this, it took 6 minutes.

    Buon appetito!

  29. #379

    Re: The recipe thread

    Homemade Cereal Bars:

    I did not measure amounts and the ingredients are not that important for the filling but honey and peanut butter are essential, the results are fantastic.

    My first lot used the following ingredients.

    Honey
    Peanut Butter
    Flaxseed
    Oatmeal
    Cranberries
    Sultanas
    Mixed seeds
    Pecan nuts
    Lemon Zest and juice

    1) Melt the honey and peanut butter until it is runny, not too hot
    2) Combine all the other ingredients in a bowl
    3) Squeeze in some lemon juice and zest to the honey and peanut mixture
    4) Combine all in the pot
    5) Leave to cool in fridge

    This is so easy to do

  30. #380

    Re: The recipe thread

    Quote Originally Posted by VinceR
    Love to oblige, but I rarely (if ever cook) & the only thing I do cook is chili:

    500g Beef Chunks, Preferable Steak
    18 Bird Eye Chilis, Chopped (do not remove the seeds)
    4 Habaneroes, Chopped (do not remove the seeds)
    4 New Mexican Chilis, Chopped (do not remove the seeds)
    2 Large Tomatoes, Peeled & Chopped
    2 Tablespoons Ground Cumin
    2 Tablespoons Parsley, Chopped
    Tomato Paste
    450g Tomato Sauce
    2 Large Onions
    4 Tablespoons of Blairs Insanity Source
    2 Tablespoons of Blair's Temporary Insanity Source
    150 ml beer
    1 Teaspoon of Ground Black Pepper
    1 Tablespoon Habenero Chili Powder
    4 Tablespoon Chili Powder
    4 Bottles of Beer

    Directions

    Sauté the onion in a small amount of chili oil until translucent, drink one bottle of beer. Bring to a simmer the tomato, tomato sauce, cumin, chili powder, parsley, Blair's sauces and ground black pepper, adding the tomato paste to thicken. Drink the 2nd bottle of beer. Now add the chili powder, habenero powder, habeneros, jalapenos & New Mexican chiles. Whilst this is simmering, drink a 3rd bottle of beer & grill the beef. Drain the meat, and season with pepper. Add the beef to the sauce along with the beer. Cook for 30 minutes & drink the 4th bottle of beer. Serve with either rice, potato wedges or skins.
    Has anyone tried this? Sounds like an MvF challenge!!

  31. #381
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    Re: The recipe thread

    Sounds painful today, tomorrow and probably the day after!

  32. #382

    Re: The recipe thread

    18 scotch bonnets :shock: that's a serious chilli! Coincidently was watching a mvf last night where they were eating a pizza with 18 bonnets blended on top! Why?

  33. #383
    Not a recipe, but a heads up.

    We normally get our meat from a local farm, but on the recommendation of a friend we bought some fillet steak from...... Aldi!

    We buy quite a lot of other groceries from there, but tbh it'd never occurred to us to try their fresh meat. On our friends recommendation we chose from their Specially Selected range the British Aberdeen Angus Fillet Steak, 14 day matured and from Scottish cattle.

    In a word: superb, one of the tastiest fillet steaks we've had in years and at less than a fiver for a six-ounce piece it's very good value too!

    Highly recommended.


    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  34. #384
    Master Cirrus's Avatar
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    Mars Bar Soup

    With cooking the key is not the complexity of the recipe or the number of advanced techniques employed - it is the quality of the ingredients. To that end, I present Mars Bar Soup. You will need;

    • A bowl
    • A microwave
    • Some Mars Bars


    Put Mars Bars in Bowl. Put bowl in microwave. Nuke until it is gloopy. Eat ;)

    If it is a particularly cold winter's evening you can... garnish it with a generous shot of the single malt of your choice, at which point it becomes awesome in the extreme!

  35. #385
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    Spiced Onions

    first post be gentle

    Spiced onions recipe
    Onions 1 – if 2 double the quantities
    Clove garlic
    Salt
    Mint sauce
    Mango chutney
    Tomato ketchup
    Tabasco sauce
    Cayenne pepper
    Red food die

    Chop onions add salt then add chopped clove of garlic
    Add min sauce quantity varies on onions – 4 tea spoons roughly
    Add mango chutney (4 teaspoons roughly)
    Add tomato sauce (Heinz is best) , this is all where you are trying to get the correct consistency add cayenne pepper and tobacco sauce to taste this is what makes them HOT
    The mixture should look pale orangey if you have it correct then it’s just add the food die to get the correct colour that’s appealing to the eye

  36. #386
    Craftsman
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    Sous Vide in a beer cooler

    I saw your post this morning about cooking steaks using the 'Sous Vide' method. I surfed around a bit and found this, http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/04/c...vide-hack.html
    So I'm trying it tonight. There's fillet steak 'cooking' in a beer cooler in my kitchen right now.
    Pics and verdict to follow.

    Bullet points:
    bought a piece of fillet steak
    sealed it in plastic bag
    poached it in 54 degree water for 3 hours
    cut into portions
    seared in very hot pan for 2 mins
    rest for 2 mins
    serve
    eat

    The water temp was checked every 20 or so minutes and regulated with very hot water. The temp fluctuated from 53 to 55 celsius over the cooking time.

    I wanted to try this method of cooking 'on the cheap' to see if the results were as good as they looked online. Then maybe I'd invest in better kit (PID, Sous Vide machine etc).

    The cooler keeping warm next to the Aga


    The meat floating in it's bath.


    Steak after 3 hours


    Portioned, seared and rested.


    Crap photo of the end result
    Last edited by rowbie; 20th October 2012 at 21:26.

  37. #387
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    Beef Rendang

    I watched Rick Stein make this on TV this week and he was so enthusiastic about it, I decided to make it this weekend.

    You can download the recipe from Rick's site - http://www.aglugofoil.com/2010/09/beef-rendang.html

    First of all, the ingredients to mix the dry paste (onion not shown)



    and here's the finished paste. I was happy to see it loopks more or less like it does on Rick's website.



    Here are the remaining ingredients, lemon grass almost out of the picture on the left and the liquid in the bowl is tamarind water with a tablespoon of cane sugar.



    The meat should just change colour, not brown



    before adding the paste



    and here it is with the lemon grass added (remove before serving), the tamarind water and the zest and juice of one lime plus 800ml of coconut milk.



    Simmer for 2 1/2 hours without lid to reduce and thicken.

    Total preparation time about 1 1/2 hours.

    2 1/2 hours later and it's reduced nicely. It was delicious!



    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  38. #388
    Craftsman
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    my wife always watches channel 4 & bbc food but she only did a recipe once! that was a failure, I must say... maybe she will take something from here on board

  39. #389
    Journeyman cdmed's Avatar
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    1 lemon
    1 lime
    1 can of chopped tomatoes
    1 glass of orange juice
    4 chicken breasts
    1 tsp of italian seasoning
    2 cloves of garlic
    1 tsp of hot salsa
    half a glass of chunky salsa
    some flaxseed if you want

    mix everything in except the lemon/lime seeds, put the zest & juices in. leave it for a bit with a lid on then grill the chicken. normally do it with couscous but rice, potatoes etc will be fine

    lovely food, good for you too

  40. #390
    Master studly's Avatar
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    Great thread with loads of great recipes. Loving the sushi. I will be back later with a quick Chili Garlic Seabass / Cod recipe for you all.

    Eddie that curry looks good. Henrik wtf that is insane, although i do love my slow cooker for big bits of meat i may give it a try.

  41. #391
    Master
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    Not had these for a while, i'll make some tonight. onion rings. greasy and bad for you but delicious. Bit of swearing in the vid DON'T click on it with the kids around. http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=TBbft...ftK8prbY&gl=GB
    Last edited by Karl; 20th December 2012 at 16:37.

  42. #392
    Craftsman
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    Sous Vide

    Just happened upon this thread myself & am loving the Sushi guide, but nervous my sausage fingers wouldn't be up to the rollinhg job but will be trying.

    The reason for posting is i bought a SV with various cash etc from Xmas & whilst it's early days am staggered at how good the results are. Steak that has a texture like butter & Chicken that after 9.30 hours at 62.5 deg tastes like no breast i've ever chomped on.

    I'll try & remember to get some pics ideas up when i really get going.

    Also in the John Lewis sale they have the Sous Vide Demi which they reckon will take 10 portions of meat, down from £299 to £249...........

    - - - Updated - - -

    Just happened upon this thread myself & am loving the Sushi guide, but nervous my sausage fingers wouldn't be up to the rollinhg job but will be trying.

    The reason for posting is i bought a SV with various cash etc from Xmas & whilst it's early days am staggered at how good the results are. Steak that has a texture like butter & Chicken that after 9.30 hours at 62.5 deg tastes like no breast i've ever chomped on.

    I'll try & remember to get some pics ideas up when i really get going.

    Also in the John Lewis sale they have the Sous Vide Demi which they reckon will take 10 portions of meat, down from £299 to £249...........

  43. #393
    Master
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    Slow roast beef

    So here's a simple and tasty slow roast.

    1) preheat your oven to 140c
    2) get your joint of beef (brisket its good and cheap too), put it into a roasting tin. Season.
    3) roughly chop some new potatoes (no need to peel) and put them in around the beef
    4) lob in about 400mls of stock
    5) cover with a tent of foil
    6) roast for 3 1/2 hours, basting every hour or so
    7) after the 3 1/2 hours, take the spuds out, put onto a hot, oiled roasting tin, back into the oven at 200c
    8) rest the meat (keep it covered) and cook the spuds for another 1/2 hour or 40 mins until they're golden.
    9) use the cooking juices as the base for a nice gravy
    10) serve and eat with a robust red wine.

    The meat should be lovely and tender. The spuds will have drawn up the meat juices.

    Enjoy!

    Alex.

  44. #394
    Apprentice Major Tom's Avatar
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    Horse

    Anyone know any decent horse recipes? Apart from supermarket ready meals of course!

  45. #395
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apm101 View Post
    So here's a simple and tasty slow roast.

    1) preheat your oven to 140c
    2) get your joint of beef (brisket its good and cheap too), put it into a roasting tin. Season.
    3) roughly chop some new potatoes (no need to peel) and put them in around the beef
    4) lob in about 400mls of stock
    5) cover with a tent of foil
    6) roast for 3 1/2 hours, basting every hour or so
    7) after the 3 1/2 hours, take the spuds out, put onto a hot, oiled roasting tin, back into the oven at 200c
    8) rest the meat (keep it covered) and cook the spuds for another 1/2 hour or 40 mins until they're golden.
    9) use the cooking juices as the base for a nice gravy
    10) serve and eat with a robust red wine.

    The meat should be lovely and tender. The spuds will have drawn up the meat juices.

    Enjoy!

    Alex.
    I got some brisket to do this at the weekend, at least I think it's brisket.

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  46. #396
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by swanbourne View Post
    Today's the day I finally got around to making the slow cook curry featured earlier in this thread. It took several visits to local Asian shops to assemble all the ingredients, I decided to start with fresh spices as the spices I already had varied in age from a few weeks to a

    Eddie
    Nice recipe but the end result was crying out for colour. A few fresh green and red chillies sliced lengthwise, even some different coloured peppers would have helped, and of course the obligatory handful of fresh Coriander.

  47. #397
    Master Martin123's Avatar
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    Rocky Road



    90 gm blanched almonds
    300gm 70 per cent dark chocolate
    400gm milk chocolate
    90gm marshmallows

    Toast almonds in oven for 10 mins until golden. Let cool. Cut two thirds of nuts into smaller pieces.

    Melt chocolate in two separate bowls, one for dark one for milk, over water simmering in saucepan.

    Let chocolate cool.

    Cut marshmallows into 1cm sizes.

    When chocolate is cool mix cut nuts into the milk chocolate. Mix two thirds of the cut marshmallows into dark chocolate.

    Get a tin about 23 cm and line with baking paper.

    Spoon milk chocolate mix in three strips into baking tin. Two on outside one in middle. In the gaps fill in with dark chocolate. Top with remaining nuts and marshmallows.

    Leave to cool and set in fridge for a couple of hours.

    To serve take out of fridge and allow to come to room temperature, it will allow the mix to be cut more easily.

  48. #398
    Apprentice Major Tom's Avatar
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    Rocky

    Can't resist a nice slab of chocolate, I'll give that Rocky Road jobby a go tomorrow.

  49. #399
    Apprentice Major Tom's Avatar
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    Chicken Zorba sounds good. Giving a try tomorrow.

  50. #400
    Master Henrik Gelardi's Avatar
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    Bajan style pepper sauce

    Inspired by the spicy thread recently, I decided to make this, and quite enjoyed it. It's based on Habaneros which I immensely enjoy. I usually do a relish which is 50/50 finely chopped onion and habaneros, and the topped with vinegar - quite nice and this resembles it but has something else to it.

    The Bajan recipe goes like this:

    225g habaneros / scotch bonnet
    225g coarsley chopped onion
    100g turmeric root peeled and diced
    4 tbsp of mild mustard (I used strong dijon mustard)
    240ml white flavourless vinegar
    1 tbsp brown sugar

    Blend the turmeric in a food processor until finely chopped (add a bit of vinegar to help the process), then add the onions.... Then add the habaneros. It will be very fragrant and nice! Pour the stuff into a large bowl, and add the mustard, vinegar and sugar. (I added all the vinegar, but depending on consistency, you might want to add a little less to get it to your own liking).

    Store in sterilised bottles or jars in the fridge. It'll keep for ages even outside the fridge because of the vinegar.

    Enjoy....

    NOTE: Use plastic gloves when working with the turmeric to avoid yellow hands. I did, but forgot when doing the dishes Also, as learned in Nuclear Engenieering 401, use gloves when doing massive amount of dicing and deseeding of Habaneros to avoid crying yourself to sleep because of napalm hands...





    Last edited by Henrik Gelardi; 9th December 2013 at 15:57. Reason: added another photo

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