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Thread: Contact details for Steve Burrage (ex Ryte Time, Leicester)

  1. #1

    Contact details for Steve Burrage (ex Ryte Time, Leicester)

    Hello you lovelies

    Do any of you have a contact details for Steve Burrage (ex Ryte Time, Leicester)?

    I'm actually a good friend of his (no, really) but my phone was nicked a couple of weeks ago and I seem to have lost a lot of numbers, including his.

    I tried an email but it just bounced back and I normally text or call him.

    I could just drive over there but it's about an hour away and he might not be in.

    Bugger!

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Grand Master
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    Can`t help with contact details, but relying on saving info in phones is a mistake and there's too much risk of losing it. Trusty old address book for me, never lets me down.

  3. #3
    Craftsman
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    Or back it up like 90% of people who live in 2018 and own a smartphone do automatically?

  4. #4
    Thanks now sorted.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Can`t help with contact details, but relying on saving info in phones is a mistake and there's too much risk of losing it. Trusty old address book for me, never lets me down.
    Think most peopleís address books are synced to iCloud or whatever platform they use.

  6. #6
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Can`t help with contact details, but relying on saving info in phones is a mistake and there's too much risk of losing it. Trusty old address book for me, never lets me down.
    I used to communicate via smoke signal but living in a city these smokeless fuel rules are a right royal PITA. Everyone tells me I should invest in a couple of pigeons but I don't know, all this new fangled technology...
    You can live in your car but you can't drive your house.

  7. #7
    Master Alansmithee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by astonandy View Post
    Or back it up like 90% of people who live in 2018 and own a smartphone do automatically?
    The baffling 'who is this? Got new phone' when you message someone...

  8. #8
    Grand Master
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    These paper address books are incredibly reliable, and being quite large theyíre quite difficult to lose. Amazing technology, you write the relevent information on the correct page with a pen........and itís there forever!

    Mobile phones are excellent....provided their limitations are recognised. A mobile phone is an Ď as well así, not an Ď instead ofí.

    I would never rely on a mobile phone as a primary storage resource for essential information, the logic is seriously flawed.

  9. #9
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    As long as Apple keep going I am unlikely to loose my contact details.

  10. #10
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    These paper address books are incredibly reliable, and being quite large theyíre quite difficult to lose. Amazing technology, you write the relevent information on the correct page with a pen........and itís there forever!

    Mobile phones are excellent....provided their limitations are recognised. A mobile phone is an Ď as well así, not an Ď instead ofí.

    I would never rely on a mobile phone as a primary storage resource for essential information, the logic is seriously flawed.
    Of course books canít burn, no sir. Not a chance.

    Picture this. We are in a pub drinking, your book on the table, my phone along side it. Some nutter nicks your book along with my gleaming iPhone. Your life connections are gone, mine will be restored the moment I pick up a new phone.

    Welcome to the 21st century.

  11. #11
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chalet View Post
    Of course books canít burn, no sir. Not a chance.

    Picture this. We are in a pub drinking, your book on the table, my phone along side it. Some nutter nicks your book along with my gleaming iPhone. Your life connections are gone, mine will be restored the moment I pick up a new phone.

    Welcome to the 21st century.
    Address book lives in the house in a safe place........simple!

    No need for the sarcasm, phones are fine, but itís all to easy to lose them.

    Yes, if the house catches fire Iíve got a problem, but thatís unlikely.
    Last edited by walkerwek1958; 14th September 2018 at 07:56.

  12. #12
    Grand Master magirus's Avatar
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    As well as backing up my iPhone weekly, or even sooner if I change the music on it, I also save my contacts to the MCBackup app and mail the small file it creates it to my iPad and Mac.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    These paper address books are incredibly reliable, and being quite large theyíre quite difficult to lose. Amazing technology, you write the relevent information on the correct page with a pen........and itís there forever!
    No it isnít. Ink fades. Now pencil, thatís forever.... weíll at least longer than ink!!

    :-)

  14. #14
    Craftsman
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Address book lives in the house in a safe place........simple!

    No need for the sarcasm, phones are fine, but itís all to easy to lose them.

    Yes, if the house catches fire Iíve got a problem, but thatís unlikely.
    If I lose my phone, I buy a new one and everything is restored. I think you've misunderstood how these devices store and back-up data. Everything is synch'd to Apple / Google etc cloud servers so that if the device goes walkies or ends up at the bottom of the sea all data, photos, messages, emails, contacts can be immediately recovered.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onespeed View Post
    No it isnít. Ink fades. Now pencil, thatís forever.... weíll at least longer than ink!!

    :-)
    Rubbish, pencil can be smudged, in fact the whole book thing is daft in these modern times. they can burn, get wet, dropped and pages fall out etc. etc.

    A backed up phone is the way to go. Or do like I do get a PA, if you get a skinny one they don't even cost much to feed

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    These paper address books are incredibly reliable, and being quite large theyíre quite difficult to lose. Amazing technology, you write the relevent information on the correct page with a pen........and itís there forever!

    Mobile phones are excellent....provided their limitations are recognised. A mobile phone is an Ď as well así, not an Ď instead ofí.

    I would never rely on a mobile phone as a primary storage resource for essential information, the logic is seriously flawed.
    Still OT with respect to the question from the OP but..... It's unusual these days for mobile phone data to be saved only on the phone.

    As you say Paul, the biggest problem with a lost phone used to be the loss of data, when the phones themselves were cheap. Nowadays the data is instantly and constantly available on multiple devices simultaneously, being saved to an account on a cloud server. Now it's the actual value of the phone that's more significant and very annoying if it gets lost or stolen.

    Your paper book may be significantly cheaper but as a single source of the data it's actually far more vulnerable than most online iPhone or Google accounts, even when tucked away safely in your house.

    Sent from my G8441 using TZ-UK mobile app

  17. #17
    Master village's Avatar
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    I used to think that address books were the way to go but then I went to bed and woke up in the 21st century.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by nunya View Post
    Rubbish, pencil can be smudged, in fact the whole book thing is daft in these modern times. they can burn, get wet, dropped and pages fall out etc. etc.

    A backed up phone is the way to go. Or do like I do get a PA, if you get a skinny one they don't even cost much to feed
    My comment was very much tongue in cheek, but ink smudges too.

    And you re no better off if your PA walks out because you re not feeding them.

    As for storing information digitally, how many cases have there been of info/accounts being hacked? And of course a book could be stolen.

    Bottom line is we store info in the way we prefer. No method is daft just to taste. :-)

  19. #19
    Grand Master
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    Hereís a novel concept for storing data.......itís called a memory! In the past it was common to remember phone numbers, I probably stored around 50 in my head at some point. With the advent of long mobile numbers this became nigh-on imposible; currently I Ďstoreí 3 and thatís all. I guess the concept of trying to remember stuff ( addresses, phone numbers etc) has become outdated, everyone relies on the ubiquitous mobile phone to remember everything.......maybe people donít even attempt to commit stuff to memory!

    The brainís like a muscle, it benefits from regular use, and I firmly believe memory is the same. If you stop trying to learn stuff you lose the ability to learn.

    All this Cloud crap us fine........... but what happens if /when it fails? Are we all happy trusting a third party to store information rather than doing it ourselves? Iím not.

    Anyhow, the OP shouldíve committed Steveís contact details to memory......simple!

  20. #20
    Grand Master Foxy100's Avatar
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    Ah the good old days. I'm sure my memory would have been much better back then but I can't remember that far.
    You can live in your car but you can't drive your house.

  21. #21
    Grand Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Hereís a novel concept for storing data.......itís called a memory!

    What if memory fails or is damaged by potentials such as grief, trauma, ill health or age, Dr Wek?

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Hereís a novel concept for storing data.......itís called a memory! In the past it was common to remember phone numbers, I probably stored around 50 in my head at some point. With the advent of long mobile numbers this became nigh-on imposible; currently I Ďstoreí 3 and thatís all. I guess the concept of trying to remember stuff ( addresses, phone numbers etc) has become outdated, everyone relies on the ubiquitous mobile phone to remember everything.......maybe people donít even attempt to commit stuff to memory!

    The brainís like a muscle, it benefits from regular use, and I firmly believe memory is the same. If you stop trying to learn stuff you lose the ability to learn.

    All this Cloud crap us fine........... but what happens if /when it fails? Are we all happy trusting a third party to store information rather than doing it ourselves? Iím not.

    Anyhow, the OP shouldíve committed Steveís contact details to memory......simple!
    I work in I.T and would never store personal details in the cloud it's just not safe enough for me personally and I know how it works.

    People need to use their brains a bit more as has been stated above.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFixer View Post
    I work in I.T and would never store personal details in the cloud it's just not safe enough for me personally and I know how it works.

    People need to use their brains a bit more as has been stated above.
    Iím not sure what kind of IT you work in, but if you know how
    cloud storage works and you think it isnít a safe place to store personal details, Iíd suggest that your career options may be running out. I doubt there are many large companies not storing personal data in the cloud and I doubt there will be any in three yearsí time.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by alfat33 View Post
    Iím not sure what kind of IT you work in, but if you know how
    cloud storage works and you think it isnít a safe place to store personal details, Iíd suggest that your career options may be running out. I doubt there are many large companies not storing personal data in the cloud and I doubt there will be any in three yearsí time.
    I don't need options I am self-employed.
    And I also said personally what others do is up to them.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfat33 View Post
    Iím not sure what kind of IT you work in, but if you know how
    cloud storage works and you think it isnít a safe place to store personal details, Iíd suggest that your career options may be running out. I doubt there are many large companies not storing personal data in the cloud and I doubt there will be any in three yearsí time.
    Cloud storage and cloud based apps are convenient as they can be accessed from pretty much anywhere and on almost anything, but boy it is annoyingly slow.

    Locally installed Office apps still work noticeably faster than Office365, and during a busy day the delays do get tiresome

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by nunya View Post
    Cloud storage and cloud based apps are convenient as they can be accessed from pretty much anywhere and on almost anything, but boy it is annoyingly slow.

    Locally installed Office apps still work noticeably faster than Office365, and during a busy day the delays do get tiresome
    That can be frustrating. A combination of local and cloud can work best.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by alfat33 View Post
    That can be frustrating. A combination of local and cloud can work best.
    True, but then thereís not much point in the cloud, except storage, which can be vulnerable depending on provider

  28. #28
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    Contact details for Steve Burrage (ex Ryte Time, Leicester)

    Quote Originally Posted by nunya View Post
    True, but then thereís not much point in the cloud, except storage, which can be vulnerable depending on provider
    Azure is pretty good these days. Plus you get unified comms, file sharing, collaborative working, automatic upgrades, integration with single sign and identity management, good mobile clients, security protection etc. But it take a bit of setting up and managing, isnít cheap and not for everyone.

    PS A lot of that stuff appeals to Millennials ;).
    Last edited by alfat33; 14th September 2018 at 18:48.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by nunya View Post
    True, but then there’s not much point in the cloud, except storage, which can be vulnerable depending on provider
    Most companies already use the cloud for infrastructure not just storage, especially start ups and now more traditional companies are already catching up.

    Corporate owned datacenters (which are mostly colocated these days) may replicate once - with cloud there are multiple copies in same region and in different countries if you pay for it.

    On a personal level how many use Office 365, Adobe Products, Apple email , google mail and other apps. They are all ‘cloud’ based. The compute and data storage is not local for Maps or Google Earth or search engines like Bing or Google etc.

    Anyway ‘cloud’ is nothing new - it used to be called hosted services - perhaps it is the scale that is different. Microsoft order in truck loads of servers at a time to populate their Azure datacenters.

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