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Thread: Multifocal Contact Lenses - Any Experience?

  1. #1
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    Multifocal Contact Lenses - Any Experience?

    Iíve worn daily disposable toric contact lenses for longer than I care to remember, and find them infinitely preferable to specs. Recently, as presbyopia inevitably starts creeping in to my prescription, Iíve been investigating multifocal contact lenses, and was wondering whether anyone uses them and could share their experience.


    As far as Iím aware, thereís currently only one manufacturer offering multifocal torics (CooperVision Proclear), and these are monthly disposables only, so Iíd also be interested if anyone knows of a daily disposable, or if perhaps we have an insider who knows when they might be coming to market.

    Thanks in advance for any input.

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    I use Dalies aqua comfort plus multifocal for scuba diving. They work for me better than a magnifying mask to see my instrumentation and whatever I'm looking at in a normal field of vision when diving. However, I don't use them for other uses as I found they are rather limiting on distances ie: driving is not much fun with them (but I can see the dash clearly). In summation, I'd say they are a compromise that just happens to be ideal for my specific purpose.

    Don't ask how they work, I've no idea!

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    I wore contact lenses to correct short sight for years, but by mid- 40s the presbyopia kicked in and they were no use to me except for running. Having adjusted to varifocal glasses I tried the multifocal contact lenses but had no success. I tried again later and just couldnít get on with them. I felt as though my eyes were taking longer to focus when changing from looking in the distance to close up. The effect was a bit like mild concussion to me, as if my eyes werenít quite working correctly. I recall going out drinking in them, after a couple of pints I felt fine in the pub and convinced myself they were OK, but when I got outside I couldnít see sharply, it seemed like an effort to focus my eyes.

    The optician, who convinced me theyíd be OK, admitted that approx 40% of wearers canít get along with them. Unless theyíve improved significantly I wonít bother trying again

    Maybe itís time to wear glasses and accept your eyes, like the rest of you, are getting old. Owing to my job I had to wear glasses daily, I only wore contacts out of work or for sport, so for me it was no great hardship to stop using contact lenses. Having said that, I prefer not wearing glasses when out in the rain etc, it would help to wear contact lenses sometimes.

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    Up until yesterday I didn't even know such things existed... never been suggested to me by Boots!

    I like the concept because it holds the promise of not having to walk around with a pair of reading glasses in my pocket (tbh I never remember so it's a pain in cafes etc....).

    tbh if there's even a slight chance of these working for me then I'll give them a try.

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Up until yesterday I didn't even know such things existed... never been suggested to me by Boots!

    I like the concept because it holds the promise of not having to walk around with a pair of reading glasses in my pocket (tbh I never remember so it's a pain in cafes etc....).

    tbh if there's even a slight chance of these working for me then I'll give them a try.
    My thoughts exactly! Just wondering how long I'll have to wait before daily disposable multifocal toric lenses come along...

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    Quote Originally Posted by ALindsay View Post
    I use Dalies aqua comfort plus multifocal for scuba diving. They work for me better than a magnifying mask to see my instrumentation and whatever I'm looking at in a normal field of vision when diving. However, I don't use them for other uses as I found they are rather limiting on distances ie: driving is not much fun with them (but I can see the dash clearly). In summation, I'd say they are a compromise that just happens to be ideal for my specific purpose.

    Don't ask how they work, I've no idea!
    Thanks for this. As for how they work, well it looks like witchcraft to me :)

    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    I wore contact lenses to correct short sight for years, but by mid- 40s the presbyopia kicked in and they were no use to me except for running. Having adjusted to varifocal glasses I tried the multifocal contact lenses but had no success. I tried again later and just couldnít get on with them. I felt as though my eyes were taking longer to focus when changing from looking in the distance to close up. The effect was a bit like mild concussion to me, as if my eyes werenít quite working correctly. I recall going out drinking in them, after a couple of pints I felt fine in the pub and convinced myself they were OK, but when I got outside I couldnít see sharply, it seemed like an effort to focus my eyes.

    The optician, who convinced me theyíd be OK, admitted that approx 40% of wearers canít get along with them. Unless theyíve improved significantly I wonít bother trying again

    Maybe itís time to wear glasses and accept your eyes, like the rest of you, are getting old. Owing to my job I had to wear glasses daily, I only wore contacts out of work or for sport, so for me it was no great hardship to stop using contact lenses. Having said that, I prefer not wearing glasses when out in the rain etc, it would help to wear contact lenses sometimes.
    Thanks for sharing your experience.

    Without CLs, I'd need to wear specs all day every day, and although my nearsightedness isn't a problem at the moment, when it does become an issue then the faff of carrying reading glasses / varifocals / prescription sunglasses / spare pairs, etc. just puts me off. Seems to me that CL technology is improving all the time, so fingers crossed it won't be long before there's a daily disposable to correct all three elements of my prescription.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    My thoughts exactly! Just wondering how long I'll have to wait before daily disposable multifocal toric lenses come along...
    There's nothing in the offing to my knowledge and realistically I can't see there being. They are rather complex to make, results are variable and there aren't enough people who want them. As was said there is only one toric mutlifocal on the market and that's a monthly I use them and they can be ok but there is always some compromise to the vision.

    They work on a concentric ring principle. All have one option with the central 3mm being the DV rx and then the rxs alternate every 1.5mm or so to the periphery. Some have a NV lens option where the central 3mm is the near rx.
    The idea being that your brain will merge it all together so you can see.
    It works, sometimes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidL View Post
    There's nothing in the offing to my knowledge and realistically I can't see there being. They are rather complex to make, results are variable and there aren't enough people who want them. As was said there is only one toric mutlifocal on the market and that's a monthly I use them and they can be ok but there is always some compromise to the vision.

    They work on a concentric ring principle. All have one option with the central 3mm being the DV rx and then the rxs alternate every 1.5mm or so to the periphery. Some have a NV lens option where the central 3mm is the near rx.
    The idea being that your brain will merge it all together so you can see.
    It works, sometimes.
    Thanks for explaining how they work - fascinating. Also appreciate your thoughts on the likelihood of dailies coming to market, although not exactly what I wanted to hear :)

    What's the cleaning and soaking regime like for the Proclear MF Torics? Can they be heat-disinfected?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidL View Post
    The idea being that your brain will merge it all together so you can see.
    It works, sometimes.
    My brain struggled........maybe the beer didnít help after all

    Your explanation of how they work sounds like what I was told. I guess itís worth giving them a try, Thatís the only way to find out.

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    I tried them as was remembering reading glasses was a pain but, just couldnít get on with them particularly when driving or looking at longer distances.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    Thanks for explaining how they work - fascinating. Also appreciate your thoughts on the likelihood of dailies coming to market, although not exactly what I wanted to hear :)

    What's the cleaning and soaking regime like for the Proclear MF Torics? Can they be heat-disinfected?
    Heat? No. It's a soft monthly disposable. Solution regime doesn't vary due to the lens, varies with the patient.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    Thanks for explaining how they work - fascinating. Also appreciate your thoughts on the likelihood of dailies coming to market, although not exactly what I wanted to hear :)

    What's the cleaning and soaking regime like for the Proclear MF Torics? Can they be heat-disinfected?
    I imagine they can but I haven't had anyone heat disinfect for years. The modern all in one systems are quite adequate for monthly lenses. As part of the proclear range the material is common to all just the design and manufacture more complex.

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    Important to accept that compared to spectacles, there has to be a compromise in the vision with multifocals. Moreso with a toric.

    Go in expecting perfect vision, and you'll be disappointed. Expect acceptable vision, and you're more likely to get on with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidL View Post
    I imagine they can but I haven't had anyone heat disinfect for years...
    Thanks - I'm behind the times on this sort of thing, having been using dailies for so long.

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    Couldn't get on with them - they felt weighted and was very aware I had them in which I don't get with daily wearers.

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    Isn't an alternative to correct for long and short sight separately in the two eyes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingstepper View Post
    Isn't an alternative to correct for long and short sight separately in the two eyes?
    Can be- I wear a contact lense in my left (dominant) eye and nothing in my right. For day to day it is a useful compromise as I can read and see long distance (inc driving).

  18. #18
    i use them for cycling so i can wear close fitting sunnies, they are a compromise ,id say better for reading than distance , can drive in them , i wear them once or twice a week they are daily disposables, wouldnt like to wear them every day or all day, they did take a bit of getting used to, but i am happy with them .


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    I wear them to play tennis and cycle, no issues and I'm happy with them.

    @mav112, mine are set up for distance more than reading so if anything I'm the other way round to you, I can't read too well with them but distance is spot on. As I understood it there is only so much range they can accommodate; I chose to sacrifice near vision for better long vision given how I use them.

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    Spent nearly 3 hours at Boots yesterday trying various power lenses.... Well it's different, I'll say that. So it's where to draw the compromise between slightly blurred distance and slightly blurred close up. Apparently the problem is my long distance is perfect so the multifocal lenses will end up making that worse BUT I'll be able to read at computer screen distance okay. tbh I don't know. Anyway they're ordering in a set for a 30 day trial... nothing ventured.

    So I was in our local cafe later that day and talking about it and a women in there said she had artificial eye lenses fitted. 100% sorted the problem....! However a search on line seems to infer £3.5K per eye!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Spent nearly 3 hours at Boots yesterday trying various power lenses.... Well it's different, I'll say that. So it's where to draw the compromise between slightly blurred distance and slightly blurred close up. Apparently the problem is my long distance is perfect so the multifocal lenses will end up making that worse BUT I'll be able to read at computer screen distance okay. tbh I don't know. Anyway they're ordering in a set for a 30 day trial... nothing ventured.

    So I was in our local cafe later that day and talking about it and a women in there said she had artificial eye lenses fitted. 100% sorted the problem....! However a search on line seems to infer £3.5K per eye!!
    Technology is similar to the contact lenses, so you get a similar effect. If you're used to perfect vision, you'll still notice the compromise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenVrs View Post
    Technology is similar to the contact lenses, so you get a similar effect. If you're used to perfect vision, you'll still notice the compromise.

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    And note that as it's surgery, you can't go back on your decision. Once the implant lenses are in, you are stuck with them for probably the rest of your life. Basically, it's identical to cataract surgery, replacing the opaque natural lens with a plastic implant - only if you do it without having cataracts, your health insurance won't pay for it. The implant lens usually is also calculated to include the equivalent of any eyeglass correction you needed before the operation (i.e. for near- or farsightedness and astigmatism), which can result in getting very good distance vision after such surgery. However, the implants won't adapt/focus at all so you'll be stuck with just good (or even excellent) distance vision. The same solution with concentric rings is also available for implants but results in less acuity for any distance (as the lens superimposes two images on your retina, of which one is always blurry depending on what you are looking at) and also produces halos around bright light sources at night or in dark spaces, which is why it's not a great solution for night driving for instance. If my info is still correct, airplane pilots are not allowed to either use multifocal contacts or multifocal implants, and in case of the latter, will be permanently declared medically unfit for flying. That should give anyone contemplating such a 'solution' reason to think twice.
    Basically, it's a marketing ploy. Offer a 'magical' solution that appeals to some people's vanity as they don't want to seem 'old' by wearing reading glasses.
    Personally, having cataract implants in both eyes, I have never juggled so many different types of glasses every day as I refuse to use varifocal glasses and use readers of different powers for different purposes. But I still prefer doing that to compromising my naked-eye distance vision. After all, most of the universe we live in is at more than one metre distance (for those who manage to get their eyes off a phone screen).

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    Yes... I couldn't figure how this would fix both near and far focus.... seeing as the lens is a fixed focus then, just like the vari-focal contacts, it's going to end up a compromise with less than perfect vision one way or both.

    I'm actually looking forward to doing the contact lens trial but NOT the hassle of taking them in and out! ;-) 20 mins in Boots undergoing 'training' and I managed it twice but this was with lots of 1-to-1 handholding. Trying this at home could be a bit of a larf! ;-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Yes... I couldn't figure how this would fix both near and far focus.... seeing as the lens is a fixed focus then, just like the vari-focal contacts, it's going to end up a compromise with less than perfect vision one way or both.

    I'm actually looking forward to doing the contact lens trial but NOT the hassle of taking them in and out! ;-) 20 mins in Boots undergoing 'training' and I managed it twice but this was with lots of 1-to-1 handholding. Trying this at home could be a bit of a larf! ;-)
    Yes the hassle of cleaning and soaking every day is what puts me off, and drove me to question whether there was any likelihood of daily disposable toric MFs becoming available.

    Insertion and removal become second nature with practice - most people seem to make the mistake of trying to put them in when there's too much liquid on them, which tends to weigh them down and make them collapse / turn inside out.

    Would be great if you could post an update on how you get on with them - good luck!
    Last edited by DMC102; 30th September 2018 at 12:32.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    Yes the hassle of cleaning and soaking every day is what puts me off, and drove me to question whether there was any likelihood of daily disposable toric MFs becoming available.

    Insertion and removal become second nature with practice - most people seem to make the mistake of trying to put them in when there's too much liquid on them, which tends to weigh them down and make them collapse / turn inside out.

    Would be great if you could post an update on how you get on with them - good luck!
    I've heard multiple patients say this, and it baffles me. The cleaning regime takes a couple of minutes a day? Even with a peroxide solution it's not that difficult or time consuming?

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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenVrs View Post
    I've heard multiple patients say this, and it baffles me. The cleaning regime takes a couple of minutes a day? Even with a peroxide solution it's not that difficult or time consuming?
    Agreed, but relative to the convenience of dailies, it feels like a backwards step.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    Agreed, but relative to the convenience of dailies, it feels like a backwards step.
    It's also up to twice as expensive to use dailies against monthlies for 5-7 day a week use. Cleaning really is only a few seconds in the evening so it's quite a premium to pay for the convenience. Also, as you are finding, there are far more parameter options in monthlies.
    I have very few patients who use lenses full time who wear dailies.

  28. #28
    I was getting along fine with my normal prescription daily disposable contacts and occasionally having to wear reading glasses for dealing with microscopic print at work but after my most recent contact lens check, they altered my prescription which resulted in me being unable to see anything close up with standard dailies. They gave me some multi-focal dailies to trial and they are fantastic. They aren't 100% for either distance or near but they are more than acceptable.

    I didn't realise that a young (middle-aged) pup such as myself could ever suffer from presbyopia but I guess it's either that or swapping glasses. A work colleague used to have 3 pairs of glasses until he got laser eye surgery and he didn't need to wear glasses at all. I don't know if that would be an option for me.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidL View Post
    It's also up to twice as expensive to use dailies against monthlies for 5-7 day a week use. Cleaning really is only a few seconds in the evening so it's quite a premium to pay for the convenience. Also, as you are finding, there are far more parameter options in monthlies.
    I have very few patients who use lenses full time who wear dailies.
    Yes my dailies come in at about £48 £35 per month, whereas the Proclear MF Torics would be around £23 plus whatever the solutions cost.

    I guess they also make more sense from an environmental perspective, and I've been chided more than once about the risk of my discarded lenses ending up inside a fish. Following last night's BBC1 documentary, Drowning in Plastic, I'm definitely going to give them a go.
    Last edited by DMC102; 2nd October 2018 at 12:56. Reason: Typo

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    Yes my dailies come in at about £48 per month, whereas the Proclear MF Torics would be around £23 plus whatever the solutions cost.

    I guess they also make more sense from an environmental perspective, and I've been chided more than once about the risk of my discarded lenses ending up inside a fish. Following last night's BBC1 documentary, Drowning in Plastic, I'm definitely going to give them a go.
    Wow..... £48pm?!

    Boots are quoting me £17.50 pm for 30 pairs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Wow..... £48pm?!

    Boots are quoting me £17.50 pm for 30 pairs.
    Typo - mine are £35 per month (£17.50 per box of 30), not £48. Not sure where I got that from.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    Typo - mine are £35 per month (£17.50 per box of 30), not £48. Not sure where I got that from.
    Even £35pm sounds a little OTT. Boots told me £17.50 and when I specifically asked is that per pair they said yes and wrote the prices down for me. tbh if it's really £35pm then I might rethink it :-( However they did say the normal price was something like forty quid and then dropped to £17.50 if you signed up for a year so a massive discount.

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Even £35pm sounds a little OTT. Boots told me £17.50 and when I specifically asked is that per pair they said yes and wrote the prices down for me. tbh if it's really £35pm then I might rethink it :-( However they did say the normal price was something like forty quid and then dropped to £17.50 if you signed up for a year so a massive discount.
    Sounds like a very good deal.

    To be clear, I'm paying £35 PM for daily disposable torics at present - £17.50 per box of 30 per eye.

    My usual supplier has just reduced the price for the monthly multifocal torics I need - they are now £31.49 per box of 3 per eye, so just under £21 per month plus cleaning solutions.

    Torics are usually more expensive but will check out the Boots deal - thanks.
    Last edited by DMC102; 2nd October 2018 at 14:23.

  34. #34
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    Well first trial fitting at home.... failed :-(

    After about a dozen attempts I dropped the lens into the sink... time to give up for today :-(

    The lens wanted to stay stuck to the end of my finger and not to my eye.

    Any suggestions please?

    Update: Watched some you tube videos.... balancing the lens on the side of the finger (right hand/right eye) and not pulling the upper eye lid up (because that makes your blink reflex more sensitive). I'll try again tomorrow morning :-(
    Last edited by solwisesteve; 3rd October 2018 at 08:19.

  35. #35
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    Make sure you're gripping the lashes, not the eyelid. There's a lot of flexibility in the lid skin, so you can still blink if holding the lids, the lashes are much more secure.
    If it takes too long, the lens will dry a bit and stick to your finger. Rewet, and try again.
    Not holding the upper lid is a new one on me, would have to have quite a large aperture to get the lens in!

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  36. #36
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    Cheers.... this was some American bint on youtube. tbh it sounded alright. As you say, I think I'd been at it so long the lens had gone dry. It is best to have a wet finger or as dry as you can get it finger?

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Cheers.... this was some American bint on youtube. tbh it sounded alright. As you say, I think I'd been at it so long the lens had gone dry. It is best to have a wet finger or as dry as you can get it finger?
    I find dry works better, with a bit of saline/solution in the cup of the lens. But everyone's different, there is no single technique that works for everyone.

    How many times did you get the lens in/out when you had the teach session?

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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenVrs View Post
    I find dry works better, with a bit of saline/solution in the cup of the lens. But everyone's different, there is no single technique that works for everyone.

    How many times did you get the lens in/out when you had the teach session?

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    three times over the course of 20 mins. This am I tried a dozen times over 15 mins and then the lens dropped in the sink so I gave up :-(

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    three times over the course of 20 mins. This am I tried a dozen times over 15 mins and then the lens dropped in the sink so I gave up :-(
    Were you sitting down? That's often the difference between the teaching sessions and how people do it at home.

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  40. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Well first trial fitting at home.... failed :-(

    After about a dozen attempts I dropped the lens into the sink... time to give up for today :-(

    The lens wanted to stay stuck to the end of my finger and not to my eye.

    Any suggestions please?

    Update: Watched some you tube videos.... balancing the lens on the side of the finger (right hand/right eye) and not pulling the upper eye lid up (because that makes your blink reflex more sensitive). I'll try again tomorrow morning :-(
    I pop my lenses in first thing when I'm in bed, if the lens does pop out it ends up on the duvet.

    Moist with saline or contact solution, lens on your index finger.

    Pull the lower eyelid down with the next finger on the same hand.

    Pop the lens in, 50 % of the time I have to do a slight adjustment moving the lens via pushing up slightly on the eyelid.

    Been doing it like that for years.

    I wear gas permeable multi focals, wish I could wear disposables but I can't due to being Mr Magoo :)

  41. #41
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    My tips:

    Dry fingers, including the one holding down the lower lid. Slightly wet lens balanced on the very tip of the index finger. Relax, and stare fixedly at the lens all the way in. Try to avoid doing it in front of a mirror - you won't always have one available, so you need to be able to do it without, and looking away at your reflection as you try to get the lens in means you'll be trying to place it on the wrong part of the eyeball. Persevere!

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenVrs View Post
    Were you sitting down? That's often the difference between the teaching sessions and how people do it at home.

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    This was leaning over the basin in the works lou... I didn't want to have to drive to work in the dark wearing them.

    I was sitting down in Boots. I think tomorrow am, at the kitchen table with desk lamp and mirror (a bit like the Boots environ).

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    My tips:

    Dry fingers, including the one holding down the lower lid. Slightly wet lens balanced on the very tip of the index finger. Relax, and stare fixedly at the lens all the way in. Try to avoid doing it in front of a mirror - you won't always have one available, so you need to be able to do it without, and looking away at your reflection as you try to get the lens in means you'll be trying to place it on the wrong part of the eyeball. Persevere!
    You might be right about the looking at the mirror. tbh I can focus on anything closer than 3ft so trying to use the mirror was a bit of a waste of time anyway! ;-)

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    My tips:

    Dry fingers, including the one holding down the lower lid. Slightly wet lens balanced on the very tip of the index finger. Relax, and stare fixedly at the lens all the way in. Try to avoid doing it in front of a mirror - you won't always have one available, so you need to be able to do it without, and looking away at your reflection as you try to get the lens in means you'll be trying to place it on the wrong part of the eyeball. Persevere!
    Doesn't matter which part of the eye the lens sits on. Soft lenses self centre, so I place it on the white part (sclera) of a patient's eye (least sensitive area), then a blink or two has it sitting centrally.

    Putting directly onto the cornea creates the strongest blink reflex, and most new wearers struggle with lid control the most.

    I wonder if the video mentioned above was an rgp wearer? They're physically much smaller, so just holding one lid may work in that situation.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenVrs View Post
    Doesn't matter which part of the eye the lens sits on. Soft lenses self centre, so I place it on the white part (sclera) of a patient's eye (least sensitive area), then a blink or two has it sitting centrally.

    Putting directly onto the cornea creates the strongest blink reflex, and most new wearers struggle with lid control the most.

    I wonder if the video mentioned above was an rgp wearer? They're physically much smaller, so just holding one lid may work in that situation.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
    Yes.... I see what you mean.... onto the whites of the eye sounds easier. Actually that was the way the optician fitted them.

    So rgp are the monthlys? Yes?

    tbh you might be right there but she did say the technique was equally applicable to dailies as well.

    Sounds like rgp lenses would be easier plus cheaper and plus more options for lens type.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenVrs View Post
    Doesn't matter which part of the eye the lens sits on. Soft lenses self centre, so I place it on the white part (sclera) of a patient's eye (least sensitive area), then a blink or two has it sitting centrally.

    Putting directly onto the cornea creates the strongest blink reflex, and most new wearers struggle with lid control the most.
    Interesting - I can only do it by placing the lens directly onto the cornea, and I only ever hold down the bottom lid. I guess after so many years I must have got the blink reflex under control.

    I find the lenses more prone to folding or popping out if they go onto the sclera first. I started out with RGPs, which you really want to get correctly centred from the outset :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    So rgp are the monthlys? Yes?
    RGP = rigid gas permeable. These are the small hard plastic lenses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by solwisesteve View Post
    Yes.... I see what you mean.... onto the whites of the eye sounds easier. Actually that was the way the optician fitted them.

    So rgp are the monthlys? Yes?

    tbh you might be right there but she did say the technique was equally applicable to dailies as well.

    Sounds like rgp lenses would be easier plus cheaper and plus more options for lens type.
    Rgp (rigid gas permeable) are small, hard lenses, usually annual replacement.
    Dailies and monthlies are soft lenses.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMC102 View Post
    Interesting - I can only do it by placing the lens directly onto the cornea, and I only ever hold down the bottom lid. I guess after so many years I must have got the blink reflex under control.

    I find the lenses more prone to folding or popping out if they go onto the sclera first. I started out with RGPs, which you really want to get correctly centred from the outset :)
    Exactly, you're pretty much using rgp technique from what you're describing. Nothing wrong with that at all, but much more tricky to pick up for a newbie.

    Once youve adapted to an rgp, could probably get a brick in there without too much discomfort;)

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by WarrenVrs View Post
    Once youve adapted to an rgp, could probably get a brick in there without too much discomfort;)
    LOL it often felt like I had on windy days :)

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