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Thread: More bike related stuff

  1. #601
    Quote Originally Posted by mowflow View Post
    Looks nice but how is that a bobber given the definition of a hardtail?
    Agreed that's about as much of Bobber as Honda Fireblade

  2. #602
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
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    I never thought I'd say it but Guzzi's lost their way.

  3. #603
    Quote Originally Posted by Thewatchbloke View Post
    I never thought I'd say it but Guzzi's lost their way.
    They are
    a manufacturer Iíve thought so highly of - right up to the point of actual ownership...

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  4. #604
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    Right. Unless I've missed something, we should be on day 2 of you becoming a real man OP. How are the lessons going?

  5. #605
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    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    1 The power is absolutely brutal - there's no other way of putting it. For an experienced rider that would no doubt be a good thing, but for someone new to larger bikes I'm not so sure.
    2 It's certainly not an "upright" naked/cruiser. My feet were tucked well back, and I was leaning forward relatively aggressively compared to others I've sat on.
    Biased as I bought a striple a few weeks ago as my first bike, but as a newbie itís been everything I wanted - light, forgiving yet powerful, looks & sounds awesome.

    You might find the power more manageable after you DAS - youíre currently comparing it to the dreaded YBR.

    I thought I wanted to be upright but actually quite liked the slightly more forward position - it felt like I was leaning backwards when went on a more upright last weekend.

    Anyway, howís the training Tony?

  6. #606
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    Everyone must be different when it comes to the power and dealing with it. I've watched a few videos where reviewers have said specific c100bhp naked triples are most definitely not for learners. However, I have noticed they are nearly always American where I think the training is less progressive/stringent.

    I'm still trying to decide on what to get, just pootling around on a 250 while I work it out. I do sometimes think anything with 3 figure power would be too much for me but then right from the start I found the 65bhp school bikes a bit pedestrian despite the instructor saying it would take me a while to get used to the power.

  7. #607
    My first bike after a long lay off was a Yamaha XJ1300 and then I switched to a Ducati multi Strada 150bhp. After 5 years Iíve changed to a Ducati Scrambler 800 that Iíve enjoyed for the last three years. The Scrambler for me is so much more fun than the others for what I do. I guess we are all after different things when it comes to bikes.

  8. #608
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    Absolutely. The only thing I know for certain is that I have absolutely zero interest in modern sports bikes and dressing like a power ranger.

  9. #609
    I know I have said it before but I think the ďnatureĒ of the bike is the most important part especially for a new rider. I would be more concerned about a new rider on an 80 bhp sports bike than a 100 bhp roadster as the power delivery and the handling will be so much less forgiving on the sports bike. I still remember my first 1000cc sports bike and being astonished how quickly corners came up suddenly and the weight vs a 600 sports bike. Even with a mature owner I still feel an ďapprenticeshipĒ helps make a better rider that enjoys their bike.

    Just as we wouldnít criticise a newly qualified driver at buying a GTi but have concerns about an M3.


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  10. #610
    Quote Originally Posted by mowflow View Post
    Everyone must be different when it comes to the power and dealing with it. I've watched a few videos where reviewers have said specific c100bhp naked triples are most definitely not for learners. However, I have noticed they are nearly always American where I think the training is less progressive/stringent.

    I'm still trying to decide on what to get, just pootling around on a 250 while I work it out. I do sometimes think anything with 3 figure power would be too much for me but then right from the start I found the 65bhp school bikes a bit pedestrian despite the instructor saying it would take me a while to get used to the power.
    Power delivery of the r nine t is very progressive, definitely not a scary machine with lots of torque and that has 110hp, maybe give one a go?

    Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk

  11. #611
    Quote Originally Posted by mowflow View Post
    Absolutely. The only thing I know for certain is that I have absolutely zero interest in modern sports bikes and dressing like a power ranger.
    Hahaha

  12. #612
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    Quote Originally Posted by mowflow View Post
    I do sometimes think anything with 3 figure power would be too much for me but then right from the start I found the 65bhp school bikes a bit pedestrian despite the instructor saying it would take me a while to get used to the power.
    Completely agree, think I said similar earlier in this epic thread. I was really nervous going from the YBR to MT-07 for DAS - FIVE TIMES the HP I was used to!! But it was fine, and didn't really get the heart going like my street triple.

    (though I accept Tony doesn't want one so I'll stop banging on about it )

  13. #613
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    Quote Originally Posted by oliverte View Post
    Power delivery of the r nine t is very progressive, definitely not a scary machine with lots of torque and that has 110hp, maybe give one a go?

    Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
    With the current deals to be had on RnineT models I was all set for getting one until it dawned on me that the engine configuration wouldn't actually squeeze into the gap set aside for a bike in my garage.

  14. #614
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    I've had three spells as a biker - in my teens as just a way if getting round affordably, in my 30's for commuting into London (great fun at the time - I wouldn't do it now) and from early 50's to date (early 60's ).

    My latest spell began with a Yamaha FZ6 then an FZ1, a Suzuki GSX1250 - a brief pause when I foolishly thought I could do without a bike - then a Suzuki GSR750 and now a Hayabusa - the first bike I've owned with clip ons and a marked contrast to my normal upright preference.

    Much what I could add has been said but these are a few general obsrrvations:

    A big part of bike enjoyment (for me) comes from simply walking into the garage and seeing a beautiful piece of engineering in front of me - so full marks for your concern about getting the looks right.

    The absokute power of the bike is not really an issue (unless you have a clumsy right hand). Despite having a ludicrously fast bike I only use a fraction of its power - the fuel mapping means throttle response is progressive and predictable. Crack the throttle open and the response is brutal (0-100 in less than 5 seconds if you know what you're doing - I couldn't do that). But the reason I love the bike is the availability of oodles of torque at low revs. If you're a laid back rider, that will make all the difference. The GSR750 I had was light(ish) and had plenty of power but if you wanted instant acceleration, you had to change down. Not the end of the world but ultimately the reason I changed it. As long as the throttle response is progressive, strong low down torque may suit your riding style. Then again you may prefer constantly hunting for the right gear.

    Plus you can see I've had 5 bikes in 10 years - like watches, no purchase needs to be long term. Good luck with your test, enjoy whatever you buy, and buy MCN every so often and you may find yourself buying something else in a few years ☺

    ATB

    Jon
    Last edited by JonRA; 20th September 2018 at 17:25.

  15. #615
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    Quote Originally Posted by mowflow View Post
    With the current deals to be had on RnineT models I was all set for getting one until it dawned on me that the engine configuration wouldn't actually squeeze into the gap set aside for a bike in my garage.
    It must be a gap that's narrower at the bottom (well, at engine level at the least) than the top as the handlebars are the widest part of the bike.

  16. #616
    And just to throw in another perspective, I bought a CB600 when I passed my test a good few years ago. But I found it pretty uncomfortable and it gave me hip cramps after not too long - I've got longish legs. After a couple of years I sold it and bought an old CB750 and turned it into a kind of street tracker but TBH I just couldn't deal with the unreliability of it. You leave it in town and come back to it later in the day wondering if it'll start or if you'll be off buting cold starts from somewhere to get it going.

    I sold that eventually too and bought a KTM supermoto that everyone told me was a hooligan machine. Previous owner had fitted a one tooth bigger rear sprocket so it was a bit better over more than 3 miles. I still have it and love it. It's comfy as the seat to peg distance is larger and the seat is huge so I can slide about on it. I sit upright so I can see over all the traffic and it's really not that scary quick. Plus, it looks like the bat bike and sounds like a helicopter.

    So, get something that suits you - even if everyone else is telling you it really wouldn't suit you.

  17. #617
    Quote Originally Posted by beem View Post
    And just to throw in another perspective, I bought a CB600 when I passed my test a good few years ago. But I found it pretty uncomfortable and it gave me hip cramps after not too long - I've got longish legs. After a couple of years I sold it and bought an old CB750 and turned it into a kind of street tracker but TBH I just couldn't deal with the unreliability of it. You leave it in town and come back to it later in the day wondering if it'll start or if you'll be off buting cold starts from somewhere to get it going.

    I sold that eventually too and bought a KTM supermoto that everyone told me was a hooligan machine. Previous owner had fitted a one tooth bigger rear sprocket so it was a bit better over more than 3 miles. I still have it and love it. It's comfy as the seat to peg distance is larger and the seat is huge so I can slide about on it. I sit upright so I can see over all the traffic and it's really not that scary quick. Plus, it looks like the bat bike and sounds like a helicopter.

    So, get something that suits you - even if everyone else is telling you it really wouldn't suit you.
    Absolutely! Your money, your choice

    Sent from my SM-G960F using TZ-UK mobile app

  18. #618
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thewatchbloke View Post
    It must be a gap that's narrower at the bottom (well, at engine level at the least) than the top as the handlebars are the widest part of the bike.
    Single garage with a small car parked in there with the bonnet facing out. The car could probably go back a bit to give enough access to get it in but TBH with a half dismantled car on the drive, another in the garage, one parked on the street outside the house and a motorbike already in the garage I'm pushing my luck with marital bliss as it is.

  19. #619
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Leave the small car on the drive. Get rid of the dismantled one. Park both bikes in garage.

    Simples
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  20. #620
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Leave the small car on the drive. Get rid of the dismantled one. Park both bikes in garage.

    Simples
    Or just have a clear out of your junk.

  21. #621
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Blimey - It seems I've been a bit negligent in respect of this thread - to be fair, though, I've been otherwise engaged. Anyway...

    On Tuesday we (that's me and the one other guy I'm training/testing alongside) spent the entire day on the road, but on YBR's; this is the standard Day 1 DAS training day at the school I'm using (North London Motorcycle Training in Edgware), and although I was sceptical about it I think I understand now why they adopt this approach. Anyway, unlike the riding I've been doing on my own, much of this was flat out, and the main things we took from the day were not to be hesitant when approaching junctions and roundabouts; and to get up to speed (that is, the speed limit if it's safe to do so), as soon as possible. tI was much more aggressive riding than I'd been doing, including spells at 60mph on dual carriageways.

    Yesterday was both exciting and upsetting. It was our first day on the Gladius 650s, and we spent half the time in a large private car park set up to mirror (albeit in a smaller area) the Mod1 test bed, and the other half on the road. The road riding, as it had been the day before, was absolutely fine. We stayed relatively local, hit some dual carriageways too, and I loved every second of it. The manoeuvres for the Mod1 test were more mixed, though. All the fast/emergency stuff was fine, and I was pretty decent on the slalom. However, I was struggling to push the bike backwards and re-park it as my technique is pants; and I put my foot down a couple of times on my u-turns. Also, I was far better going in one direction on my figure eights than the other. All of that paled into insignificance, though, when my instructor told me to park up and get off the bike for a chat. I was fairly near a perimeter fence, and for some reason decided to do a u-turn in that direction. Realising I couldn't make it I panicked, hit full lock and slowly toppled over. The embarrassment, with all the CBT candidates watching

    I went home yesterday feeling a bit dejected, but today was better and a lot of fun. The road riding was superb, with some 60 and 70 mph stretches as well as horrors like the Uxbridge Road and Hangar Lane (we also had a look at the Uxbridge test bed, where we'll be heading for the Mod1 tomorrow afternoon). The Mod1 practice was better, although if I'm honest I'm still capable of doing something silly, so I'm not going into the test in any kind of over-confident frame of mind. Hopefully, I'll get more sleep than I did last night, though, when I was replaying the bike-drop in my mind until about 3am when I think I fell asleep (and I was up at 5.30!).

    One last thing about the bike selection... the more I think about it, the more I think it's going to be a choice between the Street Twin (in black, and with some custom parts) and the Ducati Classic/Street Classic Scrambler. What I want to avoid is buying something that's too demanding (either performance wise or in terms of weight manageability) and which then stops me enjoying my bike. This is a stressful process as well as being an expensive endeavour, and I think I need to be trusting my instincts as well as listening to advice and doing my research. The thing I've been dreaming of for bloody years now is cruising along the A and B roads, and having a commuting option that gets me off the train. Never once have I thought about screaming round the track or up/down the motorways, as that's not what this is about for me.

    I'll post an update tomorrow evening, hopefully with good news (fingers crossed!).
    Last edited by learningtofly; 20th September 2018 at 18:49.

  22. #622
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    ^^^ Best of luck for tomorrow. I'm completely with you concerning bike choice, and I'm also tending towards the lower end of the available options - based on what I think I will use the bike for, where I just don't want or need very high performance.

  23. #623
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    Good luck, Tony. I hope all goes well for you tomorrow.
    Do not be disheartened by minor setbacks. They happen to us all. As it happens, I came
    close to dropping my Scrambler X today, as I was making a tight U-turn and stalled (schoolboy error, wrong gear which I did not check before committing to the manoeuvre) on the way to the bike’s first service. Fortunately I got my foot down before we reached the tipping point. I might not have been so lucky on my K1600 Bagger, which weighs about the same as the QE2.

  24. #624
    All the best for tomorrow.

    If for some reason you fluff the MOD1 part-way through, don't chuck the towel in and continue with the rest of the test. You've paid for it and the experience is very useful, particularly when the pressure is off!

  25. #625
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    Best of luck tomorrow Tony.

    I've dropped a bike like you - frustrating/annoying at the time but no real harm in the scheme of things. Plus a lesson learned and not likely to be repeated.

    ATB

    Jon

  26. #626
    Good luck, try and keep your shoulders/ arms relaxed, you'll be fine. Having given up bikes after about 30 years it's good to see someone get bitten by the bike bug. Whatever you buy you will probably drop so a more relaxed (less expensive plastics, perhaps some engine protectors) and secondhand is the way to go and if you find yourself grinding the pegs you can always go sporty later. Most important question is what watch you wearing for your test?

  27. #627
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  28. #628
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I really appreciate it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Good grief

  29. #629
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    Thatís really good thanks for posting, you sort of feel these things on a bike but the video snaps it into focus
    Steve

  30. #630
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyman View Post
    ...my K1600 Bagger...
    Good god, what a bike. And yes, 336 kg

  31. #631
    Good luck Tony

  32. #632
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    Not sure how accurate this site is, but it's quite interesting to look at the options, and may give an indication?

    http://cycle-ergo.com/

  33. #633
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    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    Good god, what a bike. And yes, 336 kg
    No doubting she is a big girl, but she is supremely comfortable, handles beautifully and, on full chat, sounds like an F1 car. My favourite.
    Last edited by Skyman; 20th September 2018 at 20:32.

  34. #634
    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    Good god, what a bike. And yes, 336 kg
    380Kg - and quite a bike too.



    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  35. #635
    Saw this bike last night, opposit end of the scale, looked so light it could float. Some trick styling too, maybe just a tad OTT?




  36. #636
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    R9T's? ....Pffttttt......





    Loving that. Properly well put together and finished.


    Sent from my iPad using TZ-UK mobile app

  37. #637
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    Quote Originally Posted by tz-uk73 View Post
    Saw this bike last night, opposit end of the scale, looked so light it could float. Some trick styling too, maybe just a tad OTT?



    Bet the geezer riding it had a beard, open face helmet, brogues, tattoos and a Belstaff Brooklands jacket! Or was one of the Thunderdolls.

    Ian
    Last edited by oldoakknives; 21st September 2018 at 00:17.

  38. #638
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    Ha, thanks for the update Tony, at least youíre enjoying the roads.

    Coming out of lunch at a caf in a builders yard just before taking mod1 I dropped the bike turning around in front of an audience - passed with no minors (letís no dwell on failing mod 2). Donít worry about it and good luck!


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  39. #639
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    I like that!

    Ian

  40. #640
    Master Argon's Avatar
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    Thanks to this thread, Iíve gone from having no intention of getting back on a bike to spending a considerable amount of my free time looking at bike reviews. R Nine T and Thruxton S are top of my list. Wife wonít be pleased when I break the news.

  41. #641
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    Good luck today Tony.

    If it helps any, I was the same with the mod1. I got a right bollocking for being down right dangerous on the emergency stop which completely destroyed my confidence.

    I found it's a luck of the day test in many ways. You can figure of 8 perfectly all day then in the day a single wee dab of the foot without ever being out of control can make all the difference. I think it's a test where there needs to be more trust put in the examiners assessment of the riders ability.

    Anyway, just relax and don't try to over think the technique. Good luck.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  42. #642
    Quote Originally Posted by mowflow View Post
    Good luck today Tony.

    If it helps any, I was the same with the mod1. I got a right bollocking for being down right dangerous on the emergency stop which completely destroyed my confidence.
    That was very unprofessional of him.

    On a lighter note, when I turned up for my re-test it was the end of December and the weather was vile, freezing cold with rain verging on sleet. The examiner announced that he would be following me around in his car, as he 'Wouldn't want to be riding in these conditions'...

    R
    Ignorance breeds Fear. Fear breeds Hatred. Hatred breeds Ignorance. Break the chain.

  43. #643
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    Oh, I agree. It almost completely put me off riding and changed my opinion of my instructor. I took a month to reflect on my options then went and did 1 more 2 hour lesson with them and passed mod1 and mod2. When I went back the instructor asked me if he'd done something to offend me and I gave him both barrels.

    My examiner also followed me in a car on mod2. I almost failed because I kept trying to leave gaps big enough for both of us, he was in a bloody big mitsubishi l200. I could hear him occasionally muttering obscenities at the traffic as it was during rush hour.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  44. #644
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldoakknives View Post
    Bet the geezer riding it had a beard, open face helmet, brogues, tattoos and a Belstaff Brooklands jacket! Or was one of the Thunderdolls.

    Ian
    Nowt wrong with Clews Competition Machine motorbikes! A British manufacturer with a proper heritage born from producing competition machines, they have always produced large single cylinder bikes and are now just latching onto the section of the market that seem to be selling well these days and fair play to them. CCM are one of the few current manufacturers who's modern (hipsterish admittedly) designs don't leave me cold.

  45. #645
    That CCM is pretty beautiful and looks well finished. Those bikes are hipster but I think that's pure enough to remain an interesting bike when things move on. They're also pretty sensible if you do a lot of in town riding.

  46. #646
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    I remember CCM from when they used B50 engines. What do they use now, Rotax?
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  47. #647
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyman View Post
    Or just have a clear out of your junk.
    Next you will be saying "who needs more than one watch anyway".

  48. #648
    Master Thewatchbloke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    I remember CCM from when they used B50 engines. What do they use now, Rotax?
    They did use Rotax engines but the new models have a modified BMW era Husqvarna engine.

  49. #649
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Very quick update - passed!!! One minor, for doing 49kph instead of 50 on the hazard avoidance.

    Elated!

  50. #650
    Nice one Tony, now the real fun starts :)

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