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Thread: More bike related stuff

  1. #5751
    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch View Post
    Funny you should bring this up. Iíve just bought a Zumo 346, with the intention of using it on any of my bikes. Iíve fitted it to the Ducati for now using the kit that came with it, and Iíve ordered 2 more fitting kits for the Triumphs..

    Where did you find the switched live please??ūüĎćūüĎć
    Surprisingly (well for me anyway), the horn is fed with a switched live, and the button on the switchgear earths it.

    I would have thought it was the other way round, but no.

    Just waiting for one of these to arrive and I'll be sorted


  2. #5752
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyp View Post
    Surprisingly (well for me anyway), the horn is fed with a switched live, and the button on the switchgear earths it.

    I would have thought it was the other way round, but no.

    Just waiting for one of these to arrive and I'll be sorted

    Cheers... thatíll do the trick.. I was going to use the DRL, but the horn will be easier..👍

  3. #5753
    Journeyman kildareman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyp View Post
    Surprisingly (well for me anyway), the horn is fed with a switched live, and the button on the switchgear earths it.

    I would have thought it was the other way round, but no.

    Just waiting for one of these to arrive and I'll be sorted

    Think all Triumphs are like that.

  4. #5754
    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch View Post
    Cheers... thatíll do the trick.. I was going to use the DRL, but the horn will be easier..
    Now you've got me wondering if the DRL will be neater...

    <pops out headlamp>

    Yes it will

    but thinking will it be easier...

    No it won't

    <pops back headlamp>

  5. #5755
    Quote Originally Posted by steptoe View Post
    Took the chance to clear out the storage garages over the last couple of months.

    Sold four bikes, but found two i'd completely forgotten about, both recommissioned, insured and MOT'd while i had the time .

    I think i'm now down to only 19 bikes. Eight on the road, insured/mot'd etc. I need to cut back some more.
    I for one would be interested in that list of bikes - what have you got?

  6. #5756
    Master Tifa's Avatar
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    Wiring accessories in can be a pain in the arse.
    Especially if it's canbus equipped.
    BMW & Aprilia are particularly sensitive, and don't like additional current loads on curcuits.
    Everything was great on my Aprillia initially, few months later, the error message monkeys woke up.
    I've used PDM60's on a few bikes with some success, 6 circuits available, allows you to pre-program current amperage/fuse rating on each. Auto-reset when there's a short. ON delay (allows bike starting with 100% of available battery power...then switches feeds to ancillaries on) OFF delay (allows circuits to remain live for a pre-set time once engine has been switched off...great for satnavs)
    https://pdm60.com/

  7. #5757
    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    I've used PDM60's on a few bikes with some success, 6 circuits available, allows you to pre-program current amperage/fuse rating on each. Auto-reset when there's a short. ON delay (allows bike starting with 100% of available battery power...then switches feeds to ancillaries on) OFF delay (allows circuits to remain live for a pre-set time once engine has been switched off...great for satnavs)
    That looks great, however at about £160 vs 10p, I'll see how i get on with the piggyback spade first.

  8. #5758
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyp View Post
    That looks great, however at about £160 vs 10p, I'll see how i get on with the piggyback spade first.
    Agree, but try not to let that put you off.
    It's one of those accessories you also can transfer from bike to bike.
    Anyway...what's £159.90p between mates?

  9. #5759
    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    Agree, but try not to let that put you off.
    It's one of those accessories you also can transfer from bike to bike.?
    At least I'd not have to buy 19 of them...

    QUOTE=Tifa;5463304]Anyway...what's £159.90p between mates?[/QUOTE]

    Very generous of you. I'll go sit by the postbox

  10. #5760
    Quote Originally Posted by Tifa View Post
    Agree, but try not to let that put you off.
    It's one of those accessories you also can transfer from bike to bike.
    Anyway...what's £159.90p between mates?
    Itís true if you wire directly in, but Iíve never had a problem with bmw canbus if you use a relay on a switched live but take the power straight from the battery. Relays are a lot cheaper than 160 quid

  11. #5761
    On 21st June I had a less than brilliant day at Mallory Park - my recently serviced Nitron Race shock had lost gas pressure and after only a couple of sessions lost it's oil so the bike was handling badly, which knocked my confidence.
    Last week I swapped the Nitron out & got the EOM Suzuki shock back in. The Nitron is going back, the canister has a minute crack due to a design flaw that they have since rectified, so they'll replace the canister & rebuilt the shock.
    Now the OEM shock is 12 years old, has never been serviced & I just guessed at an initial setting. So whilst the handling wasn't spot on today, it was OK & my confidence was restored.

    I was in inters, having not ridden on track (apart from Mallory) since July the 8th last year. There were I think 4 guys quicker than me in the group - click the link for the highlights if you're interested. Apologies in advance for the wind noise.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuZO...ature=youtu.be

    You'll notice I do most of my passing on the brakes, not under power. The old K8 GSXR 750 is severely outgunned by most of the bikes on track these days, but when the suspension is working as it should, it really handles nicely. I've had the bike for 11 years & whilst it's a bit of a 10 yard princess (lots of scratches, cracks & gaffer tape on the fairings), I absolutely love it.
    Andy

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  12. #5762
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    The cement dust puts you off, for sure! I was going Ďoh-oh-ohí just watching you go inside that guy onto the cement line.

    Iíve only done a couple of track days and they were over 10yrs ago- one a Nial Mackenzie day and the other Hopp Rider Training at Cadwell. They were both on my BoxerCup Replika, which although only 100bhp on a bike weighing around 210kg - did well in the class. The Cadwell one - I rode down from Edinburgh with the panniers on, on Pilot Road 2 tyres - took off the panniers, did the track day........ and rode home the next day.

    Would love a session on my R-1 or HP2s, on an open-type circuit, but think those days are behind me now.

    Enjoyed watching the vid.

  13. #5763
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Enjoyed that, although it did make me wonder what Bea would say if I told her one day that I was going racing. Excellent quality footage too, Andy.

  14. #5764
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    Track days arenít supposed to be racing Tony but do allow you to explore your limits (youíre still unlikely to get anywhere near the bikeís limits).

    If you want to continue to enjoy your riding on the road then Iíd advise you not to do track days; once youíve done a few, youíll find riding on the road pretty dull.

  15. #5765
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave+63 View Post
    If you want to continue to enjoy your riding on the road then Iíd advise you not to do track days; once youíve done a few, youíll find riding on the road pretty dull.
    Iíve done heaps of track days and Iím kind of finding itís the other way around. Maybe Iím just bored with them but Iím having a hard time finding the motivation to drag the gixxer to Cadwell but I throughly enjoy riding the Tribsa through the back lanes of an evening watching the scenery go past.

    I will say that the two things that improved my riding skills more than anything else were track days and moto X. For that reason alone, Iíd recommend doing loads of each.

  16. #5766
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    Quote Originally Posted by Groundrush View Post
    Iíve done heaps of track days and Iím kind of finding itís the other way around. Maybe Iím just bored with them but Iím having a hard time finding the motivation to drag the gixxer to Cadwell but I throughly enjoy riding the Tribsa through the back lanes of an evening watching the scenery go past.

    I will say that the two things that improved my riding skills more than anything else were track days and moto X. For that reason alone, Iíd recommend doing loads of each.
    Perhaps itís an age thing; Iíve not done any track days for the best part of twenty years now but I do have road bikes to potter about on.

    I also spent most of the last twenty years riding off road. Starting with trail riding on the Lancashire moors, before moving to Spain and setting up a trail riding holiday business. Then competing in H&H enduros for a number of years on my return to the UK before finally hanging up my muddy boots!

  17. #5767
    Maybe it is an age thing. I quit observed trials a few years ago after doing a superman over the bars and landing on me noggin. Havenít done many track days since my knees have decided they donít like rear sets anymore. The old Tribsa may be slow and handle like a 3 legged cow with no brakes but itís comfortable (ish) and a hoot to wrangle round the back lanes.

  18. #5768
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    Been waiting 2 months for this..... Guess Iím gonna be busy today😎👍





  19. #5769
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    Quote Originally Posted by Groundrush View Post
    Maybe it is an age thing. I quit observed trials a few years ago after doing a superman over the bars and landing on me noggin. Havenít done many track days since my knees have decided they donít like rear sets anymore. The old Tribsa may be slow and handle like a 3 legged cow with no brakes but itís comfortable (ish) and a hoot to wrangle round the back lanes.
    I think the key to enjoy both is to have 2 very different bikes, one specifically for track days, and another for riding on the road every day.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  20. #5770
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave+63 View Post
    Perhaps itís an age thing; Iíve not done any track days for the best part of twenty years now but I do have road bikes to potter about on.

    I also spent most of the last twenty years riding off road. Starting with trail riding on the Lancashire moors, before moving to Spain and setting up a trail riding holiday business. Then competing in H&H enduros for a number of years on my return to the UK before finally hanging up my muddy boots!
    My trials experience is very limited but it really did help me get a proper 'feel' for a bike...plus I've never been so sweaty and knackered than after half a day doing trials, much more so than after time on track, but that's probably and age (and weight and fitness) thing.

  21. #5771
    I enjoy both road & track & I definitely think track riding helps with brisk riding on road. If nothing else, you're far less likely to grab a handful of brakes when you think (but your not) going too fast round a corner, as unless you're mad, road cornering speeds are far slower.

    There is truth in the 2 bike thing for me:-
    1) If drop the Gixxer it doesn't owe me that much & cosmetic repairs generally = gaffer tape. Replacement track fairings cost peanuts compared to OEM road fairings + lights, indicators etc. I'd be much more careful with the S1000RR
    2) I can ride the Gixxer reasonably close to it's limits. The RR would laugh in my face & if I could ride it anywhere as hard, I'd be knackered by lunch time until I got much fitter - easier said than done @ 55.
    Andy

    Wanted - Damasko DA38 or DC80 Green - not the black versions. Bell & Ross BR03-92 Nightlum

  22. #5772
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Even MotoX has changed dramatically since the 70s. the difficulty of the course (linked to the enhanced capabilities of the bikes) and the speed they manage are now far beyond my comprehension (let alone, of course, any attempt at emulation). I tried a few(!) years back on a 125 Husky just to do one lap when I was virtually alone on a track in SW France, and even that was challenging.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  23. #5773
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy tims View Post
    I enjoy both road & track & I definitely think track riding helps with brisk riding on road. If nothing else, you're far less likely to grab a handful of brakes when you think (but your not) going too fast round a corner, as unless you're mad, road cornering speeds are far slower.

    There is truth in the 2 bike thing for me:-
    1) If drop the Gixxer it doesn't owe me that much & cosmetic repairs generally = gaffer tape. Replacement track fairings cost peanuts compared to OEM road fairings + lights, indicators etc. I'd be much more careful with the S1000RR
    2) I can ride the Gixxer reasonably close to it's limits. The RR would laugh in my face & if I could ride it anywhere as hard, I'd be knackered by lunch time until I got much fitter - easier said than done @ 55.
    Playing devil's advocate, Andy, could being confident on a track not make you overconfident on the road (where the risks and hazards are actually quite different)?

  24. #5774
    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    Playing devil's advocate, Andy, could being confident on a track not make you overconfident on the road (where the risks and hazards are actually quite different)?
    Yes, of course it possibly could.

    The point I was trying to make was more about the knowledge and skills you develop as you become a decent track rider.

    However but being a confident rider makes you more relaxed, able to ride more smoothly and efficiently on the road, devoting less bandwdith to machine control, thus freeing more for hazard perception and planning your ride according to the road & traffic conditions.
    Last edited by andy tims; 30th June 2020 at 12:25.
    Andy

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  25. #5775
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy tims View Post
    Yes, of course it possibly could.

    The point I was trying to make was more about the knowledge and skills you develop as you become a decent track rider.
    I wish I was a bit younger - I don't think the risk of tracking at my age would be sensible, given that I'd be learning from scratch.

  26. #5776
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    I wish I was a bit younger - I don't think the risk of tracking at my age would be sensible, given that I'd be learning from scratch.
    We all wish we'd be a bit younger Tony, it ached less...

    But as to discovering track (not on your baby I must add) you'd be absolutely fine. Certainly slower than younger beginners (see the aches above) but at least as enjoyable. Following an instructor who shows you the line, then slowly increases his speed is a revelation. Especially when you're shown your lap time at the beginning, and at the end of the session.
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  27. #5777
    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    I wish I was a bit younger - I don't think the risk of tracking at my age would be sensible, given that I'd be learning from scratch.
    I honestly think you'd be fine either:-

    Joining a commercial track day in the novice group & getting some (usually free) instruction from the instructors that are, in my experience, always ready to help. Unless you are completely useless

    or

    Ditto, but hiring an instructor for a whole day of 1:1 - When I saw whole day that is typically 7 x 20 minute sessions (once an hour) on track + time between each session to debrief & chill out.

    or

    Doing a Ron Haslam https://www.haslamraceschool.com/ or Jamie Whitham https://www.jameswhitham.com/ type race school, generally on their bikes with their kit.
    Andy

    Wanted - Damasko DA38 or DC80 Green - not the black versions. Bell & Ross BR03-92 Nightlum

  28. #5778
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    We all wish we'd be a bit younger Tony, it ached less...

    But as to discovering track (not on your baby I must add) you'd be absolutely fine. Certainly slower than younger beginners (see the aches above) but at least as enjoyable. Following an instructor who shows you the line, then slowly increases his speed is a revelation. Especially when you're shown your lap time at the beginning, and at the end of the session.
    Quote Originally Posted by andy tims View Post
    I honestly think you'd be fine either:-

    Joining a commercial track day in the novice group & getting some (usually free) instruction from the instructors that are, in my experience, always ready to help. Unless you are completely useless

    or

    Ditto, but hiring an instructor for a whole day of 1:1 - When I saw whole day that is typically 7 x 20 minute sessions (once an hour) on track + time between each session to debrief & chill out.

    or

    Doing a Ron Haslam https://www.haslamraceschool.com/ or Jamie Whitham https://www.jameswhitham.com/ type race school, generally on their bikes with their kit.
    Thanks, both, for the encouragement - I'll give it some serious thought.

    Edit: This looks like fun.
    Last edited by learningtofly; 30th June 2020 at 12:59.

  29. #5779
    Quote Originally Posted by Saint-Just View Post
    We all wish we'd be a bit younger Tony, it ached less...

    But as to discovering track (not on your baby I must add) you'd be absolutely fine. Certainly slower than younger beginners (see the aches above) but at least as enjoyable. Following an instructor who shows you the line, then slowly increases his speed is a revelation. Especially when you're shown your lap time at the beginning, and at the end of the session.
    Quote Originally Posted by andy tims View Post
    I honestly think you'd be fine either:-

    Joining a commercial track day in the novice group & getting some (usually free) instruction from the instructors that are, in my experience, always ready to help. Unless you are completely useless

    or

    Ditto, but hiring an instructor for a whole day of 1:1 - When I saw whole day that is typically 7 x 20 minute sessions (once an hour) on track + time between each session to debrief & chill out.

    or

    Doing a Ron Haslam https://www.haslamraceschool.com/ or Jamie Whitham https://www.jameswhitham.com/ type race school, generally on their bikes with their kit.
    Track time is definitely time well spent, regardless of age. I did mine with California Superbike School.

  30. #5780
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    Got a friend And her daughter who did both the Ron Hallam and the Jamie Whitham track days.

    Both are fairly recent full license holders. And obviously joined the novice groups. Both said that the Whitham day was the best for instruction and track time.

    The main difference is that on the RH day you use their bikes, on the JW day you use your own.

  31. #5781
    Quote Originally Posted by Groundrush View Post
    I used to enjoy trials riding but a lot of the trickier sections do require a decent amount of ďcommitmentĒ, which means hard physical input, either pogoing the thing around to get in position or splatting up a wall. That said, some of the pre 65 trials are quite laid back, good job really as those old bikes weigh a ton. I found moto x more knackering to be honest. Track riding is also knackering when itís 95 degrees and youíre on the 6th session of the day at somewhere twisty and technical where you have to climb all over the bike. Thinking about it, maybe it is a fitness thing.

    Edit: this is a splat https://youtu.be/YO-1EooTzgo
    I wish I was even close to that level. Pre 65 would be closer to my age, but still way off from my ability :(
    The skill of the top riders defies belief. I've watched a few competitions involving riders like Toni Bou and I'm left staggered by some (most) of the stuff they do with a bike.

  32. #5782
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy tims View Post
    Yes, of course it possibly could.

    The point I was trying to make was more about the knowledge and skills you develop as you become a decent track rider.

    However but being a confident rider makes you more relaxed, able to ride more smoothly and efficiently on the road, devoting less bandwdith to machine control, thus freeing more for hazard perception and planning your ride according to the road & traffic conditions.
    I agree with this, I am sure that I am a safer road rider as a result of all the track days I have done, with the biggest benefit that you come to appreciate the true capability of the bike - handling, grip, brakes, correct gears, getting the power on in the right place etc, all of which will help a lot to develop as a rider and will reduce panic in emergency situations. It might just be age, but I rarely rise to anyone flying past on my road rides as I might have done years ago, just let them get on with it knowing that at some point I will be back on track and able to redline through the gears in relative safety. For those that might not have done it, redlining a big bike through the gears and holding full throttle is a pretty violent experience. I used to hear the expression "straight line heroes" aimed at those who gave it welly on the straights but then wobbled round the corners, but holding it full on for the straights is not an easy thing to do.

  33. #5783
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch View Post
    Got a friend And her daughter who did both the Ron Hallam and the Jamie Whitham track days.

    Both are fairly recent full license holders. And obviously joined the novice groups. Both said that the Whitham day was the best for instruction and track time.

    The main difference is that on the RH day you use their bikes, on the JW day you use your own.
    Whilst both are good, I would say the Ron day is more of a track experience, with far less track time than a Jamie Whitham day. Chances are your instructor on a Whitham day will be a current BSB rider from one of the classes, which if you follow BSB is another plus I suppose.

    For anyone interested, I would tend to give the novice group a go with MSV or No Limits and see how you enjoy it first before going down the instruction route.

  34. #5784
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Just been reading about the new Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport Pro. Not massively endowed in terms of power but a lovely looking bike with full Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes, rider modes, etc. May have to go and check it out properly.




  35. #5785
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    Quote Originally Posted by learningtofly View Post
    Just been reading about the new Ducati Scrambler 1100 Sport Pro. Not massively endowed in terms of power but a lovely looking bike with full Ohlins suspension, Brembo brakes, rider modes, etc. May have to go and check it out properly.


    It does look good. I was very tempted by the Scrambler 1100 last year but this new one seems to be a solid improvement - although personally I was a fan of the exhausts on both sides of the bike on the outgoing model:


  36. #5786
    Grand Master learningtofly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by downer View Post
    It does look good. I was very tempted by the Scrambler 1100 last year but this new one seems to be a solid improvement - although personally I was a fan of the exhausts on both sides of the bike on the outgoing model:
    Yes, I know what you mean. I think it's saving grace is that it has the shock on one side and the end cans on the other. I imagine it would also look better with some small Termis on place of the stock cans.

  37. #5787
    Nice looking bike. I'm always anti dual exhausts as the cost to change to something nice like an Akra makes it a no-go. If the R1M, K1300S, And S1000RR can handle one then so can everything else. Does look nice if you have enough money or don't mind keeping it stock.

  38. #5788
    Very excited today - replaced the locks on my 3 pre-loved Givis with a matched set so I only need to carry one key!

    Before I bin the old ones, would anyone like a matched pair or a single one?

    Oh and I also fitted an Enduristan 1.6 litre fender bag to my rack so I don't have to have my phone, wallet and keys in my jacket pocket


  39. #5789
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    is it easy to change the locks I have 2 different keys for my Givi E36s?

  40. #5790
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    Job done...👍




  41. #5791
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    ^^^^^

    That just looks awesome!
    When you look long into an abyss, the abyss looks long into you.........

  42. #5792
    I think I can hear it from here

  43. #5793
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    Quote Originally Posted by andy tims View Post
    On 21st June I had a less than brilliant day at Mallory Park - my recently serviced Nitron Race shock had lost gas pressure and after only a couple of sessions lost it's oil so the bike was handling badly, which knocked my confidence.
    Last week I swapped the Nitron out & got the EOM Suzuki shock back in. The Nitron is going back, the canister has a minute crack due to a design flaw that they have since rectified, so they'll replace the canister & rebuilt the shock.
    Now the OEM shock is 12 years old, has never been serviced & I just guessed at an initial setting. So whilst the handling wasn't spot on today, it was OK & my confidence was restored.

    I was in inters, having not ridden on track (apart from Mallory) since July the 8th last year. There were I think 4 guys quicker than me in the group - click the link for the highlights if you're interested. Apologies in advance for the wind noise.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuZO...ature=youtu.be

    You'll notice I do most of my passing on the brakes, not under power. The old K8 GSXR 750 is severely outgunned by most of the bikes on track these days, but when the suspension is working as it should, it really handles nicely. I've had the bike for 11 years & whilst it's a bit of a 10 yard princess (lots of scratches, cracks & gaffer tape on the fairings), I absolutely love it.
    Andy having watched your two track days in the Lotus and today on the bike. All I can say is you have bigger cahunas than me , the overtaking on braking On the bike was skillfull, and the the Lotus mullering the BMW’s was just power to weight nirvana.

  44. #5794
    Quote Originally Posted by bwest76 View Post
    is it easy to change the locks I have 2 different keys for my Givi E36s?
    Ah, dead easy, but they are equivalent to the SL102 but I'm not sure that they'll fit.

    I'll wave the spanners at my old E360s (which I think are the same fitment as the E36s) tomorrow and see.

  45. #5795
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_in_the_UK View Post
    ^^^^^

    That just looks awesome!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gyp View Post
    I think I can hear it from here
    Agreed x 2

    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Andy having watched your two track days in the Lotus and today on the bike. All I can say is you have bigger cahunas than me , the overtaking on braking On the bike was skillfull, and the the Lotus mullering the BMWís was just power to weight nirvana.
    Thanks
    Andy

    Wanted - Damasko DA38 or DC80 Green - not the black versions. Bell & Ross BR03-92 Nightlum

  46. #5796
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyp View Post
    I think I can hear it from here
    Itís flipping loud.... I started it up without the DB killers in.... way to loud. Put the DB killers in, and itís taken the edge of it. You can keep it quiet ish when going slow, but blipping the throttle is a no no..

    Iím hoping itíll tone down a bit after a few miles, if not Iíll buy the Zard cat for it, which makes it euro 4 compliant..

    It sounds really angry at the higher revs..😈😈

  47. #5797
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch View Post
    Itís flipping loud.... I started it up without the DB killers in.... way to loud. Put the DB killers in, and itís taken the edge of it. You can keep it quiet ish when going slow, but blipping the throttle is a no no..

    Iím hoping itíll tone down a bit after a few miles, if not Iíll buy the Zard cat for it, which makes it euro 4 compliant..

    It sounds really angry at the higher revs..
    Nice looking system. Must a bit of thing to fit though!
    Cuidich 'n Righ

  48. #5798
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldoakknives View Post
    Nice looking system. Must a bit of thing to fit though!
    7 hours.... accepted Iím not the fastest of workers, but there are no instructions just a video on YouTube which missed a vital point that cost me at least an hour (hidden bolt)

    Everything on the ducati seems to take twice as long as it should, I mean an 18 month old bike, that I had to drill 3 bolts out because they were so corroded, just make hard work on the simplest of tasks, access to anything is a nightmare...

    As a comparison, Iíve just sat down after fitting a decat to my mates Thruxton R. It took about 3 hours, and everything came undone as sweet as a nut, no rounded fasteners, great access makes the job a breeze. Oh and heís chuffed to bits with the sound, nice deep rumble from the V&H silencers as he rode off..

  49. #5799
    Grand Master Saint-Just's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch View Post
    Everything on the ducati seems to take twice as long as it should, I mean an 18 month old bike, that I had to drill 3 bolts out because they were so corroded, just make hard work on the simplest of tasks, access to anything is a nightmare...
    Have you started to replace every nut and bolt, then?
    'Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain' - Schiller.

  50. #5800
    Craftsman skmark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enoch View Post
    7 hours.... accepted Iím not the fastest of workers, but there are no instructions just a video on YouTube which missed a vital point that cost me at least an hour (hidden bolt)

    Everything on the ducati seems to take twice as long as it should, I mean an 18 month old bike, that I had to drill 3 bolts out because they were so corroded, just make hard work on the simplest of tasks, access to anything is a nightmare...

    As a comparison, Iíve just sat down after fitting a decat to my mates Thruxton R. It took about 3 hours, and everything came undone as sweet as a nut, no rounded fasteners, great access makes the job a breeze. Oh and heís chuffed to bits with the sound, nice deep rumble from the V&H silencers as he rode off..
    The ease and ability to work on the bike myself was one of the reasons Iíve just changed from Ducati to Triumph. Those Italians donít like making work easy do they.


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