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Thread: 6 months free...

  1. #1

    6 months free...

    from smoking. Just realised Monday marked 6 months since I last had a cigarette (or any other nicotine). A tough first few weeks but I feel so much better for it both physically and mentally. This was my third attempt to quit.

    Itís amazing how liberating it feels not to be thinking about when the next break is, or will I run out. Never mind the better breathing and fitness. I smoked for almost 3 decades so it was a massive change.

    I donít think about them anymore and appear to be totally over it even after a pint or 2. Thought Iíd share, as I know how daunting giving up can feel before you do it. Itís worth persevering.

  2. #2
    Grand Master
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    Good on you mate, I gave up many many years ago when I left the mob, strangely the only thing I missed for a while was the first fag of the day and the taste of zippo fluid through it!!!

  3. #3
    Well done you thatís a great achievement now the next 6 months!!!

  4. #4
    Master
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    That is a great achievement, well done indeed! It's been quite a few years for me now after a couple of decades smoking, couldn't imagine doing it ever again, luckily.
    Last edited by Ruggertech; Yesterday at 09:02.

  5. #5
    Craftsman
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    Massive congrats - keep with it, it's a tough thing to do but for your health and family it's well worth it.

  6. #6
    Well done indeed its a great achievement, keep up the good work.

  7. #7
    Well done!

    Almost two years for myself - honestly the thought after one or two just makes me sick. I also have totally gone off the smell, which used to have an inviting comfort to it. Just cannot stand it now!

  8. #8
    Grand Master oldoakknives's Avatar
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    Well done keep it up. Itís worth it.
    Cuidich 'n Righ

  9. #9
    Master murkeywaters's Avatar
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    Well done.

    I tried to get my Dad to give up many times and although he tried several times he just enjoyed it too much, we've lost him now due to health problems linked with smoking, he always denied his health was anything to do with the "fags" but 50 years of smoking takes its toll, he had heart, kidney, lung and other issues and it was terrible to see him go though all the hospital visits and doctors appointments.

    But I must say he really enjoyed those roll ups and you could see it on his face, he had 50 years of a good thing in his eyes I suppose..

    Well done again and find the strength to say no when someone offers you a cheeky cig..

  10. #10
    Journeyman
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    Gave up a 40 a day B&H habit over 16 years ago.
    Now far richer in health and pocket
    Never knew how good a potato tastes until I quit the fags!

  11. #11
    Thanks guys, Iím already at the hating the smell phase! I really canít see myself ever smoking again, I promised my sons and I wonít let them down. It also helps that none of my close friends smoke anymore either.

  12. #12
    Master Rod's Avatar
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    Well done Matt! keep it up along with some exercise and you'll feel even better.

  13. #13
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt8500 View Post
    Thanks guys, I’m already at the hating the smell phase! I really can’t see myself ever smoking again, I promised my sons and I won’t let them down. It also helps that none of my close friends smoke anymore either.

    get a copy of "the easy way to stop smoking" by Allen Carr... It will stop you from ever having the thought of smoking again.. I stopped 15 years ago after numerous failed attempts. Approaching 40, I read 'the easy way' and have never had the longing for a fag again... I tried to help my older brother, bought him the book and cd but sadly he has never tried to quit and is the worst smoker I know. Every year he has a chest infection and ends up on steroids..

    Allen Carr died from lung cancer in the end - but he was a massive chain smoker before he finally managed to quit.. Think he was on 80 a day! not many people have the lungs or the wallets for that amount of smoking..

    I forgot to say - well done ! it is a great thing to be free of the evil nic'o teen.. I think it is the worst drug going..
    Last edited by bry nylon; Yesterday at 14:23.

  14. #14
    Craftsman
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    All you need to do now is never buy a pack


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app

  15. #15
    Master
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    Good for you, and for doing it the hard way.

    I've been off the fags for a month (after 40+ years), but I am vaping so I've not yet given up the evil nicotine. But my breathing and smokers cough have vastly improved over the past month. The wife gave up a week ago, and we haven't killed each other...............yet !

  16. #16
    Well done to everyone whoís quit. I smoked for 22 years and quit cold turkey, 16 years ago. One of the hardest things Iíve ever done. I still get the occasional urge to have a cigarette.. most odd. But I think of the thousands Iíve saved over the years and the urge soon passes!

    Cheers,

    Plug

  17. #17
    Master
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    Good on you mate, not easy to do. My advice is donít let your guard down and donít ever assume smoking isnít your emotional crutch. I gave up for 6 years and started again during a time of huge Personal stress coupled With work pressures.
    Iím now going through a divorce and canít imagine kicking the habit until Iím out the other side. I fully intend quitting then for health and financial reasons but right now Iím a smoker and thatís just how it is sadly.
    Stay strong and remember your kids need you fit and healthy for many years to come.

  18. #18
    Journeyman leo1790's Avatar
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    Well done, you definitely feel better for it.
    I gave up 6 years ago and I've been addicted to nicotene lozenges ever since.

  19. #19
    Master
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    Congratulations! Best thing I ever did was giving up smoking. I've given up counting but it must have been at least 18 years by now. All the best!

  20. #20
    Craftsman
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    Just to say well done....

    Keep up with it, don't go back....

    I gave up over 20 years ago... I was getting bad chest infections, coughs etc etc. I was on 40+ a day roll ups with gauloises tobacco for 15yrs... Took me nearly a full year to stop completely... now I really dislike the smell of anyone smoking near me.... I even cross the road to avoid trailing in it if someone is in front of me smoking..

    I feel really good now... I would never ever go back to smoking....

    Best Regards

    V

  21. #21
    Master Onelasttime's Avatar
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    Good going

    I haven't had a ciggie now for about three months. I wasn't a heavy smoker anyway but it was more habitual association Ė one on the way to work, one at lunchtime, one mid-afternoon, one on the way home, and a fair few more if I was out drinking.

    With lockdown and working from home I've had no triggers so haven't felt the need. I do have a vape to keep me sane but 10ml lasts me weeks.

    Annoyingly, I have a near-full 50g pouch of American Spirit, bought just before we left work. I should chuck it but I'd rather give it to someone in need when I get the chance.

  22. #22
    Thanks again all. I didnít go totally cold turkey BTW, I took Champix for 6 weeks (started 2 weeks before quitting).

    Well done to all the other quitters too, hope you used the cash saved for a decent watch purchase

  23. #23
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt8500 View Post
    Well done to all the other quitters too, hope you used the cash saved for a decent watch purchase
    It's no exageration to say that my stopping smoking fundamentally changed my life because it gave me the self belief and confidence to follow my dreams. Hope I don't spound like too much of a w@**** but it's absolutely true.

  24. #24
    Not at all! It does make you realise what you can achieve if you put your mind to it, Iíve not done anything thatís required such will power.

  25. #25
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    Well done OP and all the others that have quit. After 27 years of smoking up to 40 a day I gave up. It wasn't the asthma or the cost. It wasn't nursing my terminally ill father until the end from his cigarette related lung cancer. It was the customs seizing 1,000 cigs I was importing from Spain, trying to avoid the duties. That court summons was all that I need to stop; cold turkey.

    I have now given up for 19 years. My advice? Don't even try one. I failed so many times, but I feel so much better for giving up now. The only drawback is if someone smokes near me, I have a coughing fit leading to an asthma attack. Ironic really.

    Well done again. Remind us when you get to a year. I hope that you are putting the cash saved in a jar every day. That certainly helped me.

  26. #26
    Master RustyBin5's Avatar
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    I bought a vape on a whim a few yrs ago while buying 10 cigarettes - I still have the cigarettes and they remain unopened - the funny thing is Iíve never taken vape with nicotine so really it was cold turkey but with zero cravings. Best thing I ever did.

  27. #27
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by Onelasttime View Post
    Annoyingly, I have a near-full 50g pouch of American Spirit.
    I've got 42 pouches of baccy to get rid off after I am certain we've both given up Which are the remains of my annual road trip to Belgium to stock up. My mate who accompanies me on the road trip has already "reserved" them.

  28. #28
    Master watch-nut's Avatar
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    well done OP, keep it up.

    I'm a smoker, im 48, there's no future in it. I stopped for 5 years and then started again thinking ah, 1 wont hurt.

    Mentally i've not been in the right frame of mind to stop in the last 2 years, i know full well i have to and sooner rather than later. Your post and subsequent member comments have re-ignited the thought process and motivation. Do you know what, I'm doing it!!!

  29. #29
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by watch-nut View Post
    well done OP, keep it up.

    I'm a smoker, im 48, there's no future in it. I stopped for 5 years and then started again thinking ah, 1 wont hurt.

    Mentally i've not been in the right frame of mind to stop in the last 2 years, i know full well i have to and sooner rather than later. Your post and subsequent member comments have re-ignited the thought process and motivation. Do you know what, I'm doing it!!!
    Good on you. I had many failed attempts before finally killing it. What helped me to quit and stay quit was a change of lifestyle. I started exercising and eating right and that seemed to help in the moments of weakness. I'm not suggesting you should make massive changes to every aspect of your life straight away but replacing the smoking routine with an exercise routine will certainly help. I was living in a little village outside of Doncaster at the time called Misson. Lots of deserted country lanes and fields to run down. I remember getting as far out of the village as I could then screaming my lungs out as I ran. Sounds bonkers but it really helped and took the edge off the cravings. Anyway, good luck!
    Last edited by beechcustom; Today at 08:39.

  30. #30
    Master Thom4711's Avatar
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    I was quite young when I quit (like a fellow poster, the Allan Carr book did the trick)- mid twenties- but I was already a heavy smoker having had my first cigarette at 12. I am convinced I'd be a 100 a day type smoker right now if I hadn't stopped when I did. I'd smoke up to 30 a day if I was down the pub.

    After I'd quit I bought my first proper watch- an Omega smpc- on a whim, justifying the purchase on the fact that I'd saved a small fortune by not smoking. I'm now addicted to watches but, hey, I don't know anyone who died from watches!

    I am very aware that one cigarette would send me all of the way back to where I was, so if I'm ever tempted I figure out how much I've saved since I quit - puts me right off!

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by watch-nut View Post
    well done OP, keep it up.

    I'm a smoker, im 48, there's no future in it. I stopped for 5 years and then started again thinking ah, 1 wont hurt.

    Mentally i've not been in the right frame of mind to stop in the last 2 years, i know full well i have to and sooner rather than later. Your post and subsequent member comments have re-ignited the thought process and motivation. Do you know what, I'm doing it!!!
    Good luck! As someone said above, substituting exercise has worked for me. I would also consider Champix as it made the first few weeks bearable (and the weird dreams were a bonus!). I got it online from co-op pharmacy, but worth speaking to your GP first.

  32. #32
    Master watch-nut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt8500 View Post
    Good luck! As someone said above, substituting exercise has worked for me. .
    and this bit is key i think, idle hands and all that. But as pathetic as it sounds its quite daunting. Im not over weight but i am not fit at all and i hate running, i find it hard to stick at it because i don't enjoy it, same with treadmills, was thinking about a PT to keep me motivated, but current lockdown makes that far harder, i like competitive sport, like squash, badminton etc

    Maybe i don't like running because im not fit and maybe it will become easier, hence more enjoyable, don't know

    but would welcome tho Op's view and others on how to overcome that because its a real mental blocker for me and i dont want to pile on weight

  33. #33
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    See if you can find Couch to 5k on the interwebs. Alternatively walking is good for you. A double win, quitting and getting fitter. Good for the mental health too.

  34. #34
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by watch-nut View Post
    and this bit is key i think, idle hands and all that. But as pathetic as it sounds its quite daunting. Im not over weight but i am not fit at all and i hate running, i find it hard to stick at it because i don't enjoy it, same with treadmills, was thinking about a PT to keep me motivated, but current lockdown makes that far harder, i like competitive sport, like squash, badminton etc

    Maybe i don't like running because im not fit and maybe it will become easier, hence more enjoyable, don't know

    but would welcome tho Op's view and others on how to overcome that because its a real mental blocker for me and i dont want to pile on weight
    Get a push bike. You don't need to be a lycra road warrior just buy a cheap bike that works and get out on the quiet roads and tracks whenever you can. I'd recommend a mountain bike simply so you can get away from the cars if the opportunity presents itself. Use GPS tracking to record your mileage and you'll soon find yourself thinking "I did 6 miles last night, lets try to do 8 tonight". Above all cycling is fun, as another member said to me recently, its like being a kid again.

  35. #35
    For me what worked was a PT. I started with 2 hours a week in Jan in the gym, which is now 2 hours via video due to lockdown. I donít really enjoy running etc either, but this works as every session is different and she gives me stuff to do in between. 5 days a week with a mix of weights, running, rowing and cycling keeps it interesting. It was really hard but has got much better!

    Iíve gained a stone since quitting but itís muscle and I have the same waist size still. My worry too was weight, well fat, gain so happy with that after 6 months. One watch out is I found myself drinking more booze, not sure why.

    I guess the answer is to find something you can tolerate to start with, the enjoyment comes as you get fitter and stronger.

  36. #36
    Craftsman
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    We smoked for 20+ years, in 95' she asked for new car so I said yes, but, well 25 years on we're still off the weed, healthier and wealthier for it, if you can do 6 months you can beat it altogether, just think of the cash saved as a new watch. Congrats BTW.

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