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Thread: Dutch version of the CGSE... relieved...

  1. #1

    Dutch version of the CGSE... relieved...

    One of my boys (17 in August) has completed the exams for Dutch Secondary Education. Let's call it Dutch CGSE. Where the UK version has several levels (I think A* being the highest?) we have several levels of education and that's also your exam level. His aim the Dutch equivalent of A. If you don't pass the exam, you need to re-apply and study in the next year! Over the last year, the motivation to study took a steep dive. And steep is carefully used here. That caused some friction in the mansion, I can tell you...

    Today his class' mentor called all 28 of them telling them if they'd passed the exam. I've never seen him so nervous! I asked him: "have you ever felt this feeling before?" He answered: only when I was on the brink of becoming Dutch sailing champion! But this is more intense!" We were very lucky and relieved when he got the call that he has passed the exam. With only 0.3 points above the minimum level, but that doesn't matter now. He has passed the exam. Stoked, chuffed, happy and relieved are a few words that spring to mind.

    Next year? Off to Amsterdam where he's admissioned to (the correct word here?) a polytech institute for (potential) top-athletes, in his case: sailing. It's founded and paid for by the Johan Cruyff Foundation and we (parents) have to pay only a part of the annual costs.

    Menno


    Custom here: hoisting the flag with your rucksack so that everybody can see that you've passed the exam. Here: seconds before he hoisted it all up!

    Last edited by thieuster; 13th June 2018 at 19:27.

  2. #2
    Very good news!

    My oldest has just finished his GCSEís, but still waiting for the results apart from those where he sat the exam early or had a mark for coursework. He worked hard and is expected the top grade in all subjects, so hopefully he will get the grades he wants, Iíll be a proud dad either way.
    It's just a matter of time...

  3. #3
    Congratulations to your lad onwards and upwards


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Craftsman MintG's Avatar
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    Very well done indeed. Always great to see young people realising their potential and achieving success.

  5. #5
    Grand Master
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    Congratulations to the young fellow. Best wishes for a bright future.
    Best Regards - Peter
    Please Note: It is possible that Griswold may know nothing whatsoever about horology. It's even possible that he has never even owned a watch. It is also highly possible the he has a strange imagination. His wife insists he would be far better off paying more attention to taking his medication on time.

  6. #6
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
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    Your son did good, I hope you have rewarded him.

    My son is currently doing his GCSE's as we speak. Product design, physics and further Maths (X2) to go.

    Results due on 23rd August and assuming he does OK he should get accepted into 6th Form college to do his A Levels. Another 2 years of exams.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Andyg View Post
    Your son did good, I hope you have rewarded him.

    My son is currently doing his GCSE's as we speak. Product design, physics and further Maths (X2) to go.

    Results due on 23rd August and assuming he does OK he should get accepted into 6th Form college to do his A Levels. Another 2 years of exams.
    He got his reward. A trip to Albufeira. I had my doubts, but things worked out okay. He went with two classmates. On the first night, the adventure started. One of the boy's phones was missing and was curiously 'found' by someone. Somehow the finder had traced the owner's parents through Facebook. And suggested a handing over of the phone. My son didn't trust this: "They can mug us from all we have when we arrive. We don't know where we are, where to turn to! This is a set-up! They can only trace us when they've hacked that phone!" And he contacted us how to convince his friends that it was a bad call. That resulted into a fierce discussion between my wife and the other boy's parents here in Holland - these people didn't recognise the danger... All they wanted was to get that expensive Android back. We told our son no matter what, to put his foot down because we realised that he could be right and that we were backing him every step of the way (and praised him for his ability to think ahead - and weigh the risks). Ultimately, the boys 'agreed' to get the phone back from the finder(s) in... the hall of the local police station. Guess who went silent then... The phone never surfaced again.

    So that was a reality check and a steep learning curve 'how to survive a holiday'. We (my wife and I) are under the impression that he has learned a lot being on his own, making his own decisions. We presented him a holiday. We got back a more experienced lad that made us proud.

    Menno
    Last edited by thieuster; 13th June 2018 at 21:31.

  8. #8
    Grand Master Andyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thieuster View Post
    He got his reward. A trip to Albufeira. I had my doubts, but things worked out okay. He went with two classmates. On the first night, the adventure started. One of the boy's phones was missing and was curiously 'found' by someone. Somehow the finder had traced the owner's parents through Facebook. And suggested a handing over of the phone. My son didn't trust this: "They can mug us from all we have when we arrive. We don't know where we are, where to turn to! This is a set-up! They can only trace us when they've hacked that phone!" And he contacted us how to convince his friends that it was a bad call. That resulted into a fierce discussion between my wife and the other boy's parents here in Holland - these people didn't recognise the danger... All they wanted was to get that expensive Android back. We told our son no matter what, to put his foot down because we realised that he could be right and that we were backing him every step of the way (and praised him for his ability to think ahead - and weigh the risks). Ultimately, the boys 'agreed' to get the phone back from the finder(s) in... the hall of the local police station. Guess who went silent then... The phone never surfaced again.

    So that was a reality check and a steep learning curve 'how to survive a holiday'. We (my wife and I) are under the impression that he has learned a lot being on his own, making his own decisions. We presented him a holiday. We got back a more experienced lad that made us proud.

    Menno

    😀 Sounds all rather familar, however I would say that children today seem to be a lot more switched on and mature than I was at their age. Glad it all worked out. Nice present and well deserved.

    Whoever does not know how to hit the nail on the head should be asked not to hit it at all.
    Friedrich Nietzsche


  9. #9
    Master robcuk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thieuster View Post
    One of my boys (17 in August) has completed the exams for Dutch Secondary Education. Let's call it Dutch CGSE. Where the UK version has several levels (I think A* being the highest?) we have several levels of education and that's also your exam level. His aim the Dutch equivalent of A. If you don't pass the exam, you need to re-apply and study in the next year! Over the last year, the motivation to study took a steep dive. And steep is carefully used here. That caused some friction in the mansion, I can tell you...

    Today his class' mentor called all 28 of them telling them if they'd passed the exam. I've never seen him so nervous! I asked him: "have you ever felt this feeling before?" He answered: only when I was on the brink of becoming Dutch sailing champion! But this is more intense!" We were very lucky and relieved when he got the call that he has passed the exam. With only 0.3 points above the minimum level, but that doesn't matter now. He has passed the exam. Stoked, chuffed, happy and relieved are a few words that spring to mind.

    Next year? Off to Amsterdam where he's admissioned to (the correct word here?) a polytech institute for (potential) top-athletes, in his case: sailing. It's founded and paid for by the Johan Cruyff Foundation and we (parents) have to pay only a part of the annual costs.

    Menno


    Custom here: hoisting the flag with your rucksack so that everybody can see that you've passed the exam. Here: seconds before he hoisted it all up!

    Hey, Tell him well done!
    Maybe soon Iíll be able to say it in Dutch

    PS Everyone at work with kids is stressing about the Dutch school system, it does seem somewhat Ďaliení to any that are used to the U.K. system.

    I think many will opt for the International schools instead. Luckily my boy is 24!


    Rob

  10. #10
    Craftsman
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    Hoisting a flag reminded me of my own son when he left school. He attended Melbourne High School and had the daily job of raising the Australian and Aboriginal flags in front of the doors, feet firmly planted on the ground. The school has another flagpole at the top of building, upon which on his last day he left the St. George's Cross flying proudly, having gotten access using the key he was issued with as a member of the Historical Society. Unfortunately, the muppet forgot to take a photo. Best wishes to your lad.

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