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Thread: Re- buying a vintage watch that you lost years ago? Odd dilemma.

  1. #1

    Re- buying a vintage watch that you lost years ago? Odd dilemma.

    Bit of a strange one this, 25 years ago I came to London to start my career as a photographer, I began as a freelance assistant and then started to get jobs of my own, the first proper job was to shoot a book cover, I was paid £500 and spent £110 pounds in the little yellow watch shop in clerkenwell on a nice Omega, it had an interesting dial with silvered Arabic numerals that were flat on the dial, this watch was effectively a milestone watch for me. 10 years later it was stolen in a house burglary.

    I didnít wear a watch for over ten years after it was stolen, I didnít want a new watch, I wanted my old Omega back. Then I started working in the watch world which led me to this forum and a nice IWC I wear every day.

    Then browsing on Etsy I found this:
    https://etsy.me/2JwqtF7

    This is the first time I have seen a watch that is the exact same model with the silvered flat numerals, this looks like it has a new crown that is too fat for the watch. Thing is I havenít hit the buy button! I have no idea if Iím going to have the same attachment to it and Iím right in the middle of paying for bathroom/kitchen and to be fair not looking to spend unnecessarily.

    Anyone else replaced a vintage piece with something similar but regretted it afterwards? I guess itís a bit like having a family heirloom that gets stolen, even if you find a replacement of same age/style itís not the same is it?

  2. #2
    It does look very IWC-ish, so your replacement makes perfect sense to me.

    I guess the question you need to ask yourself is, will you be gutted if this one sells and not to you? You've finally found the same model after all these years, but your hesitation to buy suggests, to me, that you don't miss that model of watch, just your very own one of that watch.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by hughtrimble View Post
    It does look very IWC-ish, so your replacement makes perfect sense to me.

    I guess the question you need to ask yourself is, will you be gutted if this one sells and not to you? You've finally found the same model after all these years, but your hesitation to buy suggests, to me, that you don't miss that model of watch, just your very own one of that watch.
    I think itís more a case of when will I wear it? Itís a dress/weekend watch mostly, Iím unlikely to wear it every day.
    The watch is in Lithuania, if it was in a shop and I put it on my wrist I would probably know in an isnstant if I was going to buy it.

  4. #4
    Master village's Avatar
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    Buy it....try it....if you decide not to keep it it will be easy to sell on.

  5. #5
    Master TaketheCannoli's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by village View Post
    Buy it....try it....if you decide not to keep it it will be easy to sell on.
    You beat me to it!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    I think it’s more a case of when will I wear it? It’s a dress/weekend watch mostly, I’m unlikely to wear it every day.
    The watch is in Lithuania, if it was in a shop and I put it on my wrist I would probably know in an isnstant if I was going to buy it.
    Hmm I'm seeing it ships from Slovenia - is the seller claiming that watch is in multiple places? Potentially alarm bells if so, unless they have multiple outlets that they can transfer between.
    Last edited by hughtrimble; 13th June 2018 at 13:13.

  7. #7
    Sorry, got my geography wrong itís in Slovenia.

    I think Iím going to ponder over the weekend but I noticed he drops the price after a watch is listed for a while so I might snap it up.

    I do have a yobokies Seiko 5 and a 70ís Tissot seastar sat in a drawer that will probably pay for half the Omega.

  8. #8
    Grand Master number2's Avatar
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    Yes, I bought the twin of this as my first proper watch, only to have it dissappear during a messy divorce, I've got about 8 watches currently but check ebay across Europe every week or so to try to buy another.
    "Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's enemy action."

  9. #9
    Master sweets's Avatar
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    OP do not think this will be easy to shift, it may not be,
    Such an obvious re-dial is not an easy sell.
    It is a 1944 movement with a 1970s Omega branding on the dial, so look for a better example
    Dave

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by sweets View Post
    OP do not think this will be easy to shift, it may not be,
    Such an obvious re-dial is not an easy sell.
    It is a 1944 movement with a 1970s Omega branding on the dial, so look for a better example
    Dave
    Is it a redial? If so it exactly matches my watch, the same sub dial, same flat silvered numerals, I cant believe it could be the same watch (mine was stolen in London) mine had a nick in the case on the left hand side but there is no pic of that area.

    Iím not an omega expert. Maybe somebody did a load of redials in the 90ís and this is one of them as was mine?

  11. #11
    Craftsman Saxon007's Avatar
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    I thought it was a redial since there is no Swiss Made on the dial. It looks too clean for a 70 year old dial. Most that age have some discoloration and age showing.

  12. #12
    Master sweets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    Is it a redial? If so it exactly matches my watch, the same sub dial, same flat silvered numerals, I cant believe it could be the same watch (mine was stolen in London) mine had a nick in the case on the left hand side but there is no pic of that area.

    I’m not an omega expert. Maybe somebody did a load of redials in the 90’s and this is one of them as was mine?
    The one on Etsy is a redial - no doubt

    This is the only comparable photo on the Omega watches own database, from a 1943 watch, one year prior to yours

    It uses the same case, and shows what the original crown probably looked like.
    Note the design of the Omega and the Omega script. This is what they looked like back then. The one on Etsy is a much larger, taller font that they used in the 1970s, once they had discarded the applied Omega. The one on Etsy also has a much more rounded Omega itself, also from the 70s, whereas this is narrower, and looks to be drawn with an itallic nib.
    I have no doubt it is a redial.
    Dave

    ps - the same seller actually has one of the above for sale, by chance. Here. Look what an original dial should look like
    Last edited by sweets; 13th June 2018 at 18:43. Reason: add ps

  13. #13
    100% a redial... just for comparison, here is my 1944/45 (10.4m serial) with original dial & hands, inc. expected (but not mandatory) dial degradation.

    Also, it's not a 30SC, its the 17 jewel version of the 30T2 (sub second), known within Omega as the cal. 280 (mine is the 15 jewel version, the 260).


  14. #14
    Thanks for the info chaps
    As much as I liked the watch when I bought it all those years ago I think Iíll pass on this one as itís a redial and in the future when I have funds buy something else that takes my fancy thatís original.

  15. #15
    Grand Master
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    Hate the term Ďredialí, the dial is refinished and to the purists that reduces the desirability. Depends what youíre looking for, if you want a watch to be smart and wearable a refinished dialís fine, if you orefer to be anal about originality it isnít.

    Personally, it doesnít appeal to me.

    Paul

  16. #16
    So this is what it should look like:

    https://vintagecaliber.com/products/...ilver-numerals

    Now I know the Calibre reference I now know what to look out for when Iím ready to buy another watch. It wonít be like the watch that was stolen but hopefully something better.

    Thanks again for all the input.

  17. #17
    Master sweets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walkerwek1958 View Post
    Hate the term Ďredialí, the dial is refinished and to the purists that reduces the desirability. Depends what youíre looking for, if you want a watch to be smart and wearable a refinished dialís fine, if you orefer to be anal about originality it isnít.

    Personally, it doesnít appeal to me.

    Paul
    There is no need to bridle at the term redial. It is a redial, simple and plain. All visible parts of the original dial have gone.
    Refinished (your preferred term) is a more nuanced term, which hints that the dial might have been repaired, rather than wiped clean and totally repainted from scratch.
    For me, redial is more accurate, and refinished is the more misleading term.
    TBH, it is much easier to bridle at the term "being anal" about it, because that is a much more perjorative term than "redial" is.


    WRT Redials in general.......

    For me, it is clear that the best examples of old watches survive their entire life intact, with no damage.
    Dials are particularly susceptible to damage, and are also clearly visible on the watch (often unlike the movement).
    So the most desirable examples of watches have all of their original parts, whole and intact. This includes the dial.
    That is just normal.

    Now, not every watch survives this well, and may show damage.
    And there will be examples all the way along the scale from having a few age spots, to totally knackered by water ingress, storage without a crystal, whatever.
    Some of these perhaps should be left as is (slightly imperfect), but some definitely need work, because one cannot simply scrap every watch that is damaged.
    So that may include a redial. And I have no problem with this whatsoever. I have had dials done for some of my own watches before now

    But

    Redials are often (like this one) not done accurately, using incorrect details, wrong fonts, missing details, incorrect minute indices etc.
    This one has all of those.
    The wrong Omega character, the wrong Omega Script, the wrong size and style of minute index, a lack of minute track, no Swiss Made.
    Even the main numeral font, which is accurate, totally lacks the black outline to the silver numerals.
    And that is just lazy and wrong.

    So the value of this one is seriously impaired by its redial.
    Not because it si a redial, but because it is a bad redial
    Accurately done, to the original design, it could very well be as valuable as a reasonable original one.

    But a perfect original one remains king, becaue it is rare for watches to last 70 plus years in that state. And the market loves rarity.

    Dave

  18. #18
    Have to agree with Sweets on this one. It most certainly is a redial, and not refinished / retouched, which depending on the extent of the work, and who's done it, can be acceptable in the vintage world, though obviously it will still impact upon the value of the watch, though not usually by anywhere near as much as a full wipe clean redial, such as the example given by the OP.

    Vintage collectors value originality, whether that be watches, classic cars, art, etc etc. Hardly being 'anal'.

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