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Thread: Any Sailors on here (East Anglia Region?) - Let's see your boats.

  1. #1
    Master yumma's Avatar
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    Any Sailors on here (East Anglia Region?) - Let's see your boats.

    I have recently signed myself up to a 'Learn to Sail' RYA accredited course at Brightlingsea Sailing Club, it is only early doors but it has been amazingly good fun. I have always liked the water and always fancied trying Sailing but life was always getting in the way as can be the case sometimes if you allow yourself to lose sight of your aspirations.

    I saw this course advertised and thought that it was an opportunity not to miss. I'm so pleased I did too, it's superb. The feeling of the power of the wind aligned to the fact that I'm a complete novice lacking skill and control certainly gets the adrenaline flowing; I hope soon to have much better control and a modicum of knowhow.

    If anyone needs someone to crew feel free to drop me a line; hopefully in a few weeks I'll be some way towards competent; that's reassurance for you!

    Anyway, it would be good to see some photos and hear some tales. I'm in one of the Wayfarers below.

    Last edited by yumma; 17th May 2018 at 08:51.

  2. #2
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    My grandfather was an avid sailor having owned 9 boats in his lifetime most built by him, one of which being a James Wharram Raka that was designed specifically for him.
    http://wharram.eu/live/article.php/20080623100022370



    I have a painting of the boat hanging in my living room.

    As I suffer from motion sickness I've never been much of one for sailing but I have happy memories of spending summer holidays in Coombe Martin and Watermouth in Devon with him on and around the sailing club and boats there.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by yumma View Post
    I have recently signed myself up to a 'Learn to Sail' RYA accredited course at Brightlingsea Sailing Club, it is only early doors but it has been amazingly good fun. I have always liked the water and always fancied trying Sailing but life was always getting in the way as can be the case sometimes if you allow yourself to lose sight of your aspirations.

    I saw this course advertised and thought that it was an opportunity not to miss. I'm so pleased I did too, it's superb. The feeling of the power of the wind aligned to the fact that I'm a complete novice lacking skill and control certainly gets the adrenaline flowing; I hope soon to have much better control and a modicum of knowhow.

    If anyone needs someone to crew feel free to drop me a line; hopefully in a few weeks I'll be some way towards competent; that's reassurance for you!

    Anyway, it would be good to see some photos and hear some tales. I'm in one of the Wayfarers below.

    Nice picture!

    Despite its size is the Wayfarer a surprisingly seaworthy ship! All in the hands of a capable crew, of course. I've been teaching people how to sail since the mid-80s. When I was younger, mostly during the summer holidays. Later and nowadays, a weekend or even a single day. I must have sailed with hundreds of people. And honestly, I never had a bad day!

    Common boat to learn sailing over here is a Valk (Falcon). A 6m long ship, sturdy GPR, with 16m2 sail and a keel appr. 1m long/deep. It's an easy to drive boat. Originally, the Valk/Falcon was designed just before WWII and was built by a kitchen kabinet firm who wanted to display the water resistance characteristics of a multiplex wooden material in combination with good paint or maritime laquer. After WWII the boat was 'adopted' by sailing schools as GPR hull'ed boat with an alloy spar.

    Last edited by thieuster; 17th May 2018 at 12:18.

  4. #4
    Grand Master PickleB's Avatar
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    Next stop Norway...or Iceland à la Wanderer (link)?

    More seriously, good luck with the sailing. It's a lovely area and I'm sure you'll soon find ways to get some more experience.

  5. #5
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    You must be very local to me. Brightlingsea would be considered my local sailing club, despite me being on the other side of the water.

    I decided last year after years of owning power boats that I wanted to learn to sail. I sold my Nautique boat to make room for the little sail boat. It was my intention to do RYA 1&2 with Brightlingsea, but I never got round to it. I rushed into it and currently have a never used Wanderer sailing boat sitting on my drive. I do not even know how to put the mast up. Although I have tried and decided it was too difficult and I might smash it into my house.

    I haven't done much about it at all, other than recently buying a little engine for it. I was looking at it yesterday and trying to decide, am I ever going to actually use this boat, or shall I sell it. I am not sure I want to do a 2 day course on sailing.

    The other issue is, clearly these boats are meant to be left in a boat yard with the mast up. I thought I could just tow the boat to the slip, set it up and go. Your post has triggered some interest in this again.

    Quote Originally Posted by yumma View Post
    I have recently signed myself up to a 'Learn to Sail' RYA accredited course at Brightlingsea Sailing Club, it is only early doors but it has been amazingly good fun. I have always liked the water and always fancied trying Sailing but life was always getting in the way as can be the case sometimes if you allow yourself to lose sight of your aspirations.

    I saw this course advertised and thought that it was an opportunity not to miss. I'm so pleased I did too, it's superb. The feeling of the power of the wind aligned to the fact that I'm a complete novice lacking skill and control certainly gets the adrenaline flowing; I hope soon to have much better control and a modicum of knowhow.

    If anyone needs someone to crew feel free to drop me a line; hopefully in a few weeks I'll be some way towards competent; that's reassurance for you!

    Anyway, it would be good to see some photos and hear some tales. I'm in one of the Wayfarers below.


  6. #6
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    Pleased you are enjoying it, there is nothing like being on the water imo.

    Next you will be looking at sailing holidays.
    This Company is probably the best out there in the best location.
    www.wildwind.co.uk

  7. #7
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    Did an accelerated course in the British Virgin Islands with these guys

    https://www.bwss.com/

    Did ASA101 ,103 and 104 in 5 days live aboard , second week we chartered a boat ourselves and sailed around the islands (we took a local skipper).

    I think technically this qualifies me on paper to day skipper.

    The course was extremely tough , requiring a bunch of theory to learn beforehand , written exams every morning. Physically quite tough as we sailed from dawn to late afternoon with lots of course changes and man overboard drills. Then you had to chart and skipper a leg at the end yourself with a man overboard drill chucked in without warning.

    It was tough but great fun and the BVI was paradise to sail.

    Alas I have been too busy to sail since but I still hanker after it.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.D View Post
    Did an accelerated course in the British Virgin Islands with these guys

    https://www.bwss.com/

    Did ASA101 ,103 and 104 in 5 days live aboard , second week we chartered a boat ourselves and sailed around the islands (we took a local skipper).

    I think technically this qualifies me on paper to day skipper.

    The course was extremely tough , requiring a bunch of theory to learn beforehand , written exams every morning. Physically quite tough as we sailed from dawn to late afternoon with lots of course changes and man overboard drills. Then you had to chart and skipper a leg at the end yourself with a man overboard drill chucked in without warning.

    It was tough but great fun and the BVI was paradise to sail.

    Alas I have been too busy to sail since but I still hanker after it.
    This looks good!!

    It's a nice idea extend your skills and go out for a sailing holiday. Greek coast is great as well (Preveza, Korfu etc). I have heard great things about Croatia, but I've never been there myself. A little closer to your home: Norfolk. You need serious sailing skills though to sail these boats along the canals, tacking and jibing with on-coming vessels swiftly approaching... http://www.broadssailingholidays.co.uk

    Menno

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by thieuster View Post
    This looks good
    Menno
    I cannot emphasise enough how hard those 5 days were.

    If you didn’t make the grade you would flunk. The instructor we had was actually surprised that we had pretty much memorised the reading matter beforehand . ( took me 3 months).

    In the evening I know why the local cocktail is the “painkiller”.

    Our skipper (hardnosed bostonian gentleman but a lot of fun) , I asked how to deal with blisters ; I was good at backwinding the jib so got stuck to that a lot but my soft hands were complaining and squirting blood and flesh about after 2 days. Think I had electrical insulating tape wrapped around my fingers under my gloves , (shredded after 2 days).

    “Yeah” he drawled “ Don’t get em!”

    My response , which he laughed about was “Well eff you very much Bill!”

    Great fun . Really gave me a perspective on life those two weeks.

  10. #10

    Any Sailors on here (East Anglia Region?) - Let's see your boats.

    My son (between 70 and 85 days/year on the water) refuses to wear gloves when the outside temp is above 10C. Not only he, but tons of sailors hate these gloves. When he (reluctantly...) wears them, he prefers these:



    Magic Marine's Sticky Gloves. 3 sets for less than 20 euros. I must say that I haven't tried to compare them, but I think that a proper garden center sells the same without the MM logo on it - which will cut the price with 50% I guess.



    Bare hands, just like the sailor in front of him

    Due to the fact that he refuses to wear gloves, his hands look like they belong to someone working in the fishing industry or a farm: big, torn up, scarred and with lots of callus. And he's not the only one, all his mates' hands look the same. When so many days on the water, the quality and thickness of the mainsheet is oh so important. Every year it is a quest for the perfect main sheet (needs to be replaced after a year).

    I went sailing last Saturday and my hands were torn... One day on the water and my hands are gone.


    Menno
    Last edited by thieuster; 17th May 2018 at 18:36.

  11. #11
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    I'm in East Anglia, sadly no boat but have friends with Yachts, spent a month with them sailing around Turkey/Greece a few years back and have had a week with them every year sailing in the med. Just back from Kefalonia where we went with SeaTrek to do my ICC inshore course and passed it, so very happy bunny and had a great holiday at the same time, missus got her competent crew too, can't wait to go back , perhaps a flotilla next.....then a charter?? Cheers, John B4

  12. #12
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    Its something I'd love to do. Rutland Water and Drayton Reservoir are both reasonable close to me. Alas I dont know when I'd get time.

    Keep trying to talk the Mrs in to a flotilla holiday, no luck yet.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by anz3001 View Post
    Its something I'd love to do. Rutland Water and Drayton Reservoir are both reasonable close to me. Alas I dont know when I'd get time.

    Keep trying to talk the Mrs in to a flotilla holiday, no luck yet.
    Flotilla sailing is the first step when you prefer salt water. Easy, always professionals nearby for advise. Super relaxed. Kids love it: they have enough friends to play with once in a harbour or bay! After that holiday, it's 'bareboating'. But, flotilla sailing is preferable with kids.

    Some rental companies over here have the same yachts here, on sweet water as they have on salt water. They can give it a try on the Dutch lakes and then hop over to Greece where the same type of boat is moored.

    Menno

  14. #14
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    Shouldn't that be Breitlingsea sailing club? (I'll get my coat)...

  15. #15
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    ex RYA instructor here. Qualified when I was 16 and spent the summer after my GCSEs instructing in the south of France.
    Used to sail near Lincoln, in a mixture of boats. Mirror, Heron, Topper, Enterprise, Laser and Laser 2 mostly.
    Did my Level 5 in Poole harbour, One of the best sails I ever had was with another guy on the course in a Wayfarer.
    It was blowing about a force 4 or 5 and we were planing around the harbour like hooligans with no rudder 😎
    Never forget that feeling of Zen like mastery.

    One day I’ll get back to it, but under the water (scuba) is my current wet sport

    Dave

  16. #16
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    Do the RYA 1 & 2 teach you how to rig a boat as well as sail it?

  17. #17
    Grand Master PickleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyb28 View Post
    Do the RYA 1 & 2 teach you how to rig a boat as well as sail it?
    Rigging comes as part of Level 2, see Adult beginners' courses ...and you'll generally find the instructors helpful in dealing with any specific queries you have have.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyb28 View Post
    Do the RYA 1 & 2 teach you how to rig a boat as well as sail it?
    They will but if you are brave you could go and do a week with an RYA affiliated centre in the Med or Greece where you can do your 1&2, sail some impressive kit with a top class instructor in warm water (capsizing is much nicer in warm water), be rigging your own boat by day 2 and come back with a few dozen hours under your belt.
    I did my 1&2 on a local lake here in the UK mainly because the kids had theirs, Mrs R then promptly booked us for 2 weeks at Wildwind in Vassiliki after a recommendation. In the second week we were flying around the bay in 20kts of wind double trapeezing a Hobie 16 catamaran. We then spent the next 5 summers at the same place and made some very good friends who did the same.

  19. #19
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    Some friends of mine have been to Vassiliki. Whilst they said it was fantastic, it was also very expensive.

    Not sure I am up for the intense course to be honest, it doesn't sound very relaxing :p

    Quote Originally Posted by Riley View Post
    They will but if you are brave you could go and do a week with an RYA affiliated centre in the Med or Greece where you can do your 1&2, sail some impressive kit with a top class instructor in warm water (capsizing is much nicer in warm water), be rigging your own boat by day 2 and come back with a few dozen hours under your belt.
    I did my 1&2 on a local lake here in the UK mainly because the kids had theirs, Mrs R then promptly booked us for 2 weeks at Wildwind in Vassiliki after a recommendation. In the second week we were flying around the bay in 20kts of wind double trapeezing a Hobie 16 catamaran. We then spent the next 5 summers at the same place and made some very good friends who did the same.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyb28 View Post
    Some friends of mine have been to Vassiliki. Whilst they said it was fantastic, it was also very expensive.

    Not sure I am up for the intense course to be honest, it doesn't sound very relaxing :p
    It's not intense at all, you do as much or as little as you like. I spent many hours by the pool relaxing after an exhilarating sail.
    Good luck with what ever you do, it's a great pastime.

  21. #21
    Craftsman subseastu's Avatar
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    Just a quick note. I'm a deep sea navigator by trade (now oil and gas but still navigate various ships) and I know what the rules of the road say about motor and sail but please can I just ask that those of you that use smaller motor / sail craft around the coast and port areas give a reasonable clearance to vessels restricted by water depth in buoyed channels and on the approach. We all know that most ships aren't that manoeuvrable compared to pleasure craft.

    The number of times I've been on the bridge having to take action due to some pleasure cruiser with a 1m draught because he thinks he needs to be somewhere and decides that me in my 5m draught 60000 ton ship should stay out his way on the way into Portsmouth or wherever doesn't instill the greatest of respect.

    I know most on here are sensible but nearly 25yrs at sea and it wears thin. I'll now wait for the ooo sailor / golden rivet in the draft thread, or even here actually.

    Safe Saling and always turn on the 7th and good luck in any exams.

    Sent from my E5823 using Tapatalk

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by subseastu View Post
    Just a quick note. I'm a deep sea navigator by trade (now oil and gas but still navigate various ships) and I know what the rules of the road say about motor and sail but please can I just ask that those of you that use smaller motor / sail craft around the coast and port areas give a reasonable clearance to vessels restricted by water depth in buoyed channels and on the approach. We all know that most ships aren't that manoeuvrable compared to pleasure craft.

    The number of times I've been on the bridge having to take action due to some pleasure cruiser with a 1m draught because he thinks he needs to be somewhere and decides that me in my 5m draught 60000 ton ship should stay out his way on the way into Portsmouth or wherever doesn't instill the greatest of respect.

    Sent from my E5823 using Tapatalk
    Zero to RYA day skipper in 6 months here. All done in winter in the Solent. Your request is noted as I very nearly got this wrong. I still can’t believe how deceptive a major vessel coming up the Solent is vs my 6kt sailing/motoring speed.

    IMG_3821.JPG

    Anyone need crew?


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app

  23. #23
    Craftsman subseastu's Avatar
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    ^^^ to put this into perspective my training (obviously involved alot more than just navigation) was 4 years in total including 18 months seatime and the rest at college. Finishing with a HNC (completely laughable really as some have said that it's more hnd and the chief mates is more degree level but you only get a hnd. But I'll not go into the mca and it's failings to the British merchant seaman) after two 3 hour exams and a one on one oral with a mca examiner. Extremely tough.

    The thing with alot of large vessels is the momentum they carry though the water. Average speed in channels is about 10-12 knots generally to maintain good steerage and under pilot orders. Alot of commercial ships will need about 4-5 cables to crash stop at that speed. Easy to forget when buggering about on smaller craft.

    But I appreciate your reply. I just wish every wafi was the same.

    Sent from my E5823 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by subseastu; 18th May 2018 at 20:39.

  24. #24
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    I now have a small motor boat after many years of unpowered sailing. I take safety on the water very seriously as do most sailors that I know. You obviously get the weekend hooligans that jump into a boat without any training and you can spot them a mile off. Another problem is that sail boat skippers think that "power gives way to sail" is written in stone, common sense doesn't always prevail.
    The lack of legislation for boating in the UK has it's merits amongst sensible people but being able to jump into a boat without formal qualifications is in minus IMO. I think even the basic RYA course will touch on COLREGS (regulations for avoiding collisions at sea) and that should be a starting point for anyone who wants to take to the water.
    Last edited by Riley; 19th May 2018 at 12:03.

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