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Thread: TZ Cycling/Bike Appreciation thread!

  1. #3051
    Quote Originally Posted by PawG View Post
    Im looking for an endurance or kind of “do it all” bike at the moment..

    What do you guys think of this?

    https://www.cyclist.co.uk/bmc/6583/b...-02-one-review


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    Seems way overpriced considering the wheels you get with it.
    Weighs the same as my Bowman Weald but I have nice carbon wheels and no electronic shifting
    For that budget I could build something really nice and versatile
    And that proprietary stem, tall headtube plus press fit BB kills it for me.
    No mudguard eyelets either?

  2. #3052
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
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    My 29-year old son, Michael, and I spent two mornings this week ebiking the Maui countryside...


  3. #3053
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    Quote Originally Posted by PawG View Post
    Im looking for an endurance or kind of ďdo it allĒ bike at the moment..

    What do you guys think of this?

    https://www.cyclist.co.uk/bmc/6583/b...-02-one-review


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    I agree with Mr Smith , thats a lot of cash for a do it all bike. I feel a bit more soul searching on where you want to ride and what do you want to get out of it , plus a bit of research could net you a cracking road bike at 60/70% of the BMC road machines price. I know its cliche but we dont buy ď do it all shoesĒ do we, so apply your preferences for a first bike and if you get bitten by the bug you have some cash to put towards your second choice.

  4. #3054
    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    I agree with Mr Smith , thats a lot of cash for a do it all bike. I feel a bit more soul searching on where you want to ride and what do you want to get out of it , plus a bit of research could net you a cracking road bike at 60/70% of the BMC road machines price. I know its cliche but we dont buy ď do it all shoesĒ do we, so apply your preferences for a first bike and if you get bitten by the bug you have some cash to put towards your second choice.
    Thanks. This will be my 12th or so bike. I just wanted a 2nd opinion because I havenít bought one since before Covid and everything in my size seems to be sold out! I wasnít sure if this is a good value or not, but I decided to buy it. I found a slightly used example with less than 1000 miles on the clock and basically half price of RRP, so I thought it was a decent deal with the BMC frame and full Ultegra Di2. The wheels will be upgraded for next season.
    I shouldnít have said do it all bike, itíll be a long distance road riding with an occasional multi day trip. Also on the road.


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  5. #3055
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    Pawg , apologies I read this as an entree to cycling, so wrong. With 12 bikes under your belt then clearly you have done your homework. Turning to wheels I took advice off here and upgraded my Racing Fulcrums to hand built Malcolm Borg tubeless wheels ( £680) . As they say numbers dont lie and my Strava sections tumbled, so after 30 something years of hearing people saying wheels are the best upgrade I listened and acted.

    Ultegra is a solid groupset and Di2 just lifts it . Enjoy and photos or it didnít happen:)

  6. #3056
    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Pawg , apologies I read this as an entree to cycling, so wrong. With 12 bikes under your belt then clearly you have done your homework. Turning to wheels I took advice off here and upgraded my Racing Fulcrums to hand built Malcolm Borg tubeless wheels ( £680) . As they say numbers dont lie and my Strava sections tumbled, so after 30 something years of hearing people saying wheels are the best upgrade I listened and acted.

    Ultegra is a solid groupset and Di2 just lifts it . Enjoy and photos or it didnít happen:)
    Will do, I should have it in a week or two. Iíll check the Malcolm Borg wheels too. Thanks


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  7. #3057
    Grand Master 100thmonkey's Avatar
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    Here's one of my Zwift Playlists for your indoor motivation

    https://open.spotify.com/playlist/74...e88eeb549d4522
    "When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say,
    For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today"

  8. #3058
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    Park Tool puncture repair kit?

    I rode my e-Moulton TSR8 along to the supermarket in the next settlement, just under 6 miles from the house. There was a new Schwalbe lightweight inner tube on the front, replaced like for like. The old one had a hole too near the valve to fix it. Loaded up with shopping and about two miles from home the steering went wonky. I pulled over and discovered a flat front tyre. Not being the sort to rely on others I carry a good toolkit and spare tubes, so I whipped the tube out and put a new one in, pumped it up and re-assembled the bike. The puncture being on the spoke side of the tube, but no obvious spokes sticking out of the nipple. That's the first puncture in many years.

    When I got home I whipped out the holed tube, marked the hole with a large cross with a pen and set about with the puncture repair kit. Long story short, the vulcanising solution tube was still sealed and appeared full, but when I broke the seal and pressed the tube there was nothing in it but air. ~`not even a whiff of the glue. Good job that I hadn't relied on it when out on the road. I had a Rema Tip Top puncture kit at home so that provided the solution to the problem. Once again, proof if it were needed that two is one and one is none!

    I always tend to recommend Park Tool as makers of reasonable kit at reasonable prices. They have never let me down before. Two new Rema Tip Top kits ordered from Amazon, and a tube of Rema vulcanising solution ordered from Amazon. New rim tapes on order from SJS Cycles.

  9. #3059
    Master andyjay's Avatar
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    So, following the Olympics, Iíve decided to do something that Iíve always wanted to do, but never really got around to. Iím going to build a fixie!

    Iím going to use a lot of parts from three or four other bikes, but had to buy a frame and some wheels as Iíve nothing suitable. Everything should be turning up over the next few week, then Iíll have to assemble it, Iím only aiming to use it for a local run around, and it is fairly flat around here, so Iím going with a 42/16 as a) this should be about right, and b) the wheels come with a 16, and Iíve got a 42 chain set!

    Iíve never ridden a fixed wheel, and am looking forward to it, but also slightly nervous as you hear horror stories. Any tips will be welcome!

  10. #3060
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    why not build it as a single speed with a normal hub? A lot more forgiving when out riding and you want to relax your legs on any downhill parts of your run.

    Ive never ridden a fixie so just thinking out loud.

    Quote Originally Posted by andyjay View Post
    So, following the Olympics, Iíve decided to do something that Iíve always wanted to do, but never really got around to. Iím going to build a fixie!

    Iím going to use a lot of parts from three or four other bikes, but had to buy a frame and some wheels as Iíve nothing suitable. Everything should be turning up over the next few week, then Iíll have to assemble it, Iím only aiming to use it for a local run around, and it is fairly flat around here, so Iím going with a 42/16 as a) this should be about right, and b) the wheels come with a 16, and Iíve got a 42 chain set!

    Iíve never ridden a fixed wheel, and am looking forward to it, but also slightly nervous as you hear horror stories. Any tips will be welcome!
    Cheers,

    Ben



    ..... for I have become the Jedi of flippers


    " an extravagance is anything you buy that is of no earthly use to your wife "

  11. #3061
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    Quote Originally Posted by andyjay View Post
    Any tips will be welcome!
    I wouldn't ride a fixie on the road, single speed fine though.

    If you've been inspired by the Olympics book a session on the track and try a fixed wheel where they should be ridden, amazing fun.

  12. #3062
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    A Fixie is often seen as an excuse for no brakes. Itís a danger to the rider and those around him/her.

    A single speed is a better idea

  13. #3063
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbh View Post
    I wouldn't ride a fixie on the road, single speed fine though.

    If you've been inspired by the Olympics book a session on the track and try a fixed wheel where they should be ridden, amazing fun.
    Quote Originally Posted by ben4watches View Post
    why not build it as a single speed with a normal hub? A lot more forgiving when out riding and you want to relax your legs on any downhill parts of your run.

    Ive never ridden a fixie so just thinking out loud.
    To be honest, Iíve tried single speeds before, and it is the challenge of the fixie that I want to try! Also, Iíve bought a flip-flop hub so that if I really hate it, I can immediately convert to a single speed.

    Iím hoping that we will organise a club run to a velodrome to try the track, weíre just not quite that organised at the moment!

  14. #3064
    Journeyman Dean Learner's Avatar
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    I'll vote for giving the fixed wheel a go. Have ridden them a lot and really do enjoy the ride. Did wonders for my technique and strength as a smooth pedal stroke and strong/stable core muscles are rewarded (even demanded) by these bikes.

    The whole zen thing is real and the way you can control speed with your legs and ride for ages without touching the brakes is an absolute pleasure.

    Definitely be cautious on the road but running a front brake I have never had an issue and commuted in city traffic for years hassle free though did not enjoy riding fixed in the wet!!

    Be cautious if you go for a fully fledged track bike on the road as they are STIFF and knock you around plus no bottle mounts etc so very compromised. That said though on the velodrome where they belong they are superb.

    If you get a chance to ride a proper velodrome it's amazing. Impossible to comprehend the first time you roll around the bottom of the track but you'll be up the top of the banking in no time and loving it. First go was the most terrified I've even been on a bike (even with having done huge alpine descents in terrible weather and mountain biked extensively the intimidation of the velodrome is very real). Fortunate to have a very high quality new timber track here and loved the sessions on it.

    Give it a go and sure you won't regret it (until you forget to keep pedaling and it kicks you up the backside).

    And just a word of warning in case you ever consider it, don't give fixed mountain biking a go!!! I tried and man it's hard work and really punishes any poor technique (for those not sensible enough to listen, look for the bolt on cogs that replace your disc rotor and you'll be riding fixed in no time).

  15. #3065
    Grand Master 100thmonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacifichrono View Post
    My 29-year old son, Michael, and I spent two mornings this week ebiking the Maui countryside...


    He looks older than 29!
    "When You Go Home, Tell Them Of Us And Say,
    For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today"

  16. #3066
    Ive never ridden a fixie so just thinking out loud.
    (This is not aimed at you personally)

    People who haven’t ridden fixed always seem to have an opinion but I would say go for it, obviously with a front brake.
    I offer that advice as somebody who has ridden fixed since 2007, I even used to take it on club runs but now I just use it for short local rides and use my road bikes or brompton when appropriate.

    I’m not a fan of SS on the road as it has none of the nuanced speed modulation of a fixed gear (rode SS mtb a lot which makes a lot of sense especially in the winter)
    You have the option to flip the hub but remember you will need a back brake for the bike to be legal if not riding fixed.

    What gear inch where you thinking of running? 68-72 is the sweet spot for me.

    If you do go the track you will not be able to ride your fixed bike there without removing the brake calliper, fitting a pair of handlebars without the levers and likely fitting a smaller cog to get a decent gear to avoid spinning out.

  17. #3067
    Master andyjay's Avatar
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    The bits have started to arrive!

    The frame is a Dolan urban frame set with bottle and mudguard bosses. Iíve opted for front and back brakes as I have a spare setup and want to use the levers to lean on. Also as mentioned, if I decide to go down the single speed route, Iím covered.

    Iím going to be running a 44/16 as that is what Iíve been got, Iíve got a spare 38 tooth chain ring, but think itíll be to low geared with that on. Iíll give it a go and see how I get on, the hills are OK where I am, so not envisaging to many problems, Iím fairly strong so think itíll be OK!

    I started gathering parts yesterday, stuff has started to arrive, I think the thing that is going to be slowest is the frame, which will slow things down someÖ

    Still very excited to give it a go!

  18. #3068
    72.3 inches. if thatís too high for you then get a 17 or 18t. the 38 chainring will give you 62.4in which is very spinny.

  19. #3069
    Master andyjay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    72.3 inches. if thatís too high for you then get a 17 or 18t. the 38 chainring will give you 62.4in which is very spinny.
    Cheers, Iíll see how it goes, Iím trying to buy as little as possible, so will start with this setup. If it is terrible(!) then Iíll buy a new sprocketÖ

    Wish me luck!

  20. #3070
    Quote Originally Posted by andyjay View Post
    So, following the Olympics, Iíve decided to do something that Iíve always wanted to do, but never really got around to. Iím going to build a fixie!

    Iím going to use a lot of parts from three or four other bikes, but had to buy a frame and some wheels as Iíve nothing suitable. Everything should be turning up over the next few week, then Iíll have to assemble it, Iím only aiming to use it for a local run around, and it is fairly flat around here, so Iím going with a 42/16 as a) this should be about right, and b) the wheels come with a 16, and Iíve got a 42 chain set!

    Iíve never ridden a fixed wheel, and am looking forward to it, but also slightly nervous as you hear horror stories. Any tips will be welcome!
    Definitely go for it! Obviously, with a front brake unless you want to ride track only.

    I used to ride fixed daily and did few longer rides during winter and all I can say itís great if thereís no hills. Uphill is not that bad as if you choose your gearing wisely you can just find your rhythm, but I sincerely say - fu*k downhill on the fixie. Itís mostly manageable, but as soon as you hit a steeper, longer downhill, itís not pleasant. Seems like a pointless excercise really.


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  21. #3071
    I've been riding fixed wheel for years, on the track and on the road.
    Gear sizing is a personal thing, depending if you like to spin (high cadence v low cadence). I'm in the low cadence camp as I tend to push a big gear.

    Also depends on the terrain that you normally cycle on. Don't pick too low a gear to get up hills cos then you'll spin madly on the descent. Fixed wheel uphill is good. Learn to push down & pull up on the pedals.

    Put a front brake on and don't stop pedalling. Ever.

  22. #3072
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    I'd love to ride a fixie again (my brother had one when I was a kid) but my usual cycling routes are just too climby. My dodgy knees wouldn't like it. If I lived somewhere flat though I'd be well up for it.

  23. #3073
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    I set my Orange mountain bike up as a single speed ( not fixie) using the middle ring of the triple eg 32 ( outer and inner junked). Using a spacer kit from the USA I chose a 16 tooth rear so 2:1 using a Shimano free hub

    On the local canal rides and gentle climbs it was unbeatable, so fast and quick to respond, but if it went up too much , it was mucho running.

  24. #3074
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    I ride fixed most days on my commute 25 mile round trip. 48x19 suits me but 44x18 also. It's reasonably hilly in North Manchester. Remember to keep pedalling but the bike will remind you. I have front and rear brakes. Don't forget if you have track nuts or hex bolts on the hubs to pack a suitable tool to remove the wheel

  25. #3075
    Fixee fan here . Would not ride anything else around London. And yes I have two brakes , disc ones actually on my badboy. 42x16 my go to gear. Enjoy .

  26. #3076
    I do wish fixed riders would stop expressing ratios in chainrings, Itís gear inches!
    Makes it easier to understand especially as several different chainring/sprocket combos are the same GI.

    ďI run 47x16 which is quite hardĒ
    ďReally thatís nothing, I run 41x14Ē
    ďYou are both beginners, I run 50x17Ē

    They are all the same...

  27. #3077
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 100thmonkey View Post
    He looks older than 29!
    Prematurely gray! (maybe...74?)

  28. #3078
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
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    My new ebike is 48/14 (Shimano), with just seven rear cogs. The cadence is particularly high in 7th at high speeds (20-28 mph). Thinking of swapping out the 48T chainwheel for a 54. My ebike runs 20"x 4" tires, BTW.

    Thoughts?


  29. #3079
    Thoughts?
    Looks like a standard 4 bolt spacing and no front mech or chainstay issues so should be an easy swap. What about an 11t on the cassette? Is it a standard freehub?

    It’s a moped not an e-bike?
    I guess the law is very different in the U.S possibly different from state to state also.

    What’s it like to pedal uphill with a flat battery?!

  30. #3080
    Master pacifichrono's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    Looks like a standard 4 bolt spacing and no front mech or chainstay issues so should be an easy swap. What about an 11t on the cassette? Is it a standard freehub?

    It’s a moped not an e-bike?
    I guess the law is very different in the U.S possibly different from state to state also.

    What’s it like to pedal uphill with a flat battery?!
    Not pleasant, since the bike as accessorized pushes 75 pounds. But pedaling through 7 gears with up to 1000W of max power adding to your stroke, is amazing!

    The rear sports a freewheel, which I'm told can't be fiddled with - - no cassette.

  31. #3081
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    Quote Originally Posted by dulux View Post
    I've been riding fixed wheel for years, on the track and on the road.
    Gear sizing is a personal thing, depending if you like to spin (high cadence v low cadence). I'm in the low cadence camp as I tend to push a big gear.

    Also depends on the terrain that you normally cycle on. Don't pick too low a gear to get up hills cos then you'll spin madly on the descent. Fixed wheel uphill is good. Learn to push down & pull up on the pedals.

    Put a front brake on and don't stop pedalling. Ever.
    I rode a 25 mile Time Trial on a 72Ē fixed gear once. Thatís 48x18. I got round in 58m 40s. Average cadence was around 120 iirc (2 full turn of the cranks per second). Once was enough.

  32. #3082
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeromeo View Post
    Fixee fan here . Would not ride anything else around London. And yes I have two brakes , disc ones actually on my badboy. 42x16 my go to gear. Enjoy .
    I did actually look in to using a fixed hub with discs, one of my donor bikes is a Cannondale Badboy with an Alfine hub, but couldnít find any hubs/wheels suitable in my price range. So Iíll steal parts off it, and keep it until I manage to find something suitable at the right price! The other thing Iíve always wanted to do is to build my own wheels, but havenít got round to that yet.

    All in good timeÖ

  33. #3083
    Master
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    15m ‘Wildlife’ ride this morning
    A large buzzard really close up- then a seal and finally a dolphin off the harbour arm
    Fantastic

  34. #3084
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    I do wish fixed riders would stop expressing ratios in chainrings, Itís gear inches!
    Makes it easier to understand especially as several different chainring/sprocket combos are the same GI.

    ďI run 47x16 which is quite hardĒ
    ďReally thatís nothing, I run 41x14Ē
    ďYou are both beginners, I run 50x17Ē

    They are all the same...
    That depends on the wheel and tyre size. My bikes have 18Ē, 20Ē and 26Ē wheels.

    Sheldon Brown is helpful

  35. #3085
    Quote Originally Posted by Templogin View Post
    That depends on the wheel and tyre size. My bikes have 18Ē, 20Ē and 26Ē wheels.

    Sheldon Brown is helpful
    Which is why the calculators allow you to put the tyre size in! Your bikes could all have the same gear chainrings/cogs but all be different to pedal which is why gear inches make sense.

    How far you travel for each turn of the pedals, no need to make it more complicated than that.
    (Though there is an argument to switch that to metric but some bike things things have stuck with inches)

  36. #3086
    Master Templogin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrSmith View Post
    Which is why the calculators allow you to put the tyre size in! Your bikes could all have the same gear chainrings/cogs but all be different to pedal which is why gear inches make sense.

    How far you travel for each turn of the pedals, no need to make it more complicated than that.
    (Though there is an argument to switch that to metric but some bike things things have stuck with inches)
    My point exactly!

  37. #3087
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    Riders of fixed will typically say that they ride a 72 inch gear (or whatever). This dates back to the ĎPenny Farthingí or ĎOrdinaryí cycling days when the gear size or gear inch was described as being the diameter in inches of the large front wheel which the cranks had a direct feed in to. The distance travelled for one full turn of the pedals could be worked out by multiplying the diameter of the front wheel by pi (3.14). The size of the front wheel & hence size of the gear would be naturally limited by the riderís inside leg measurement!
    Last edited by trident-7; 21st August 2021 at 16:52.

  38. #3088
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    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Pawg , apologies I read this as an entree to cycling, so wrong. With 12 bikes under your belt then clearly you have done your homework. Turning to wheels I took advice off here and upgraded my Racing Fulcrums to hand built Malcolm Borg tubeless wheels ( £680) . As they say numbers dont lie and my Strava sections tumbled, so after 30 something years of hearing people saying wheels are the best upgrade I listened and acted.

    Ultegra is a solid groupset and Di2 just lifts it . Enjoy and photos or it didnít happen:)
    Which BORG's did you go for? I'm looking to upgrade my current wheelset (DT Swiss E1800) and keep coming back to the BORG45's. Reading loads of good feedback online.

  39. #3089
    Grand Master magirus's Avatar
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    Interesting development from Shimano.



  40. #3090
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~dadam02~ View Post
    Which BORG's did you go for? I'm looking to upgrade my current wheelset (DT Swiss E1800) and keep coming back to the BORG45's. Reading loads of good feedback online.
    Hi Dadam sorry I didnt see this question earlier . I went for Borg 26 2.1 with sealed hubs. I didnt need the deep section and it was my first venture into custom built wheels. I had them fitted in April and from day 1 they have been true. Borg heat relieve there wheels post spoke tensioning so there is no ď pinging ď or spokes loosening off. As its my summer bike and competes with two others I have only done about 5->800 miles on them , but they have been great. In the first couple of rides my Strava pbs improved by about 15 secs on say 5 min sections consistently.

    They are lovely for climbing and still give a compliant ride.

    Lastly Malcom Borg is so easy to deal with, email enquiries are replied either same day or latest next day. Often he replies around 10pm the same day. Build lead time was 3.5 weeks and they delivered on that.

    Hope this helps even if I didnt go for the 45ís

    Steve

  41. #3091
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    Quote Originally Posted by magirus View Post
    Interesting development from Shimano.


    Thanks for posting I can but dream. Interesting whilst the rear mech is wireless , it is connected by a wire to the front mech as they are both connected to the same battery! Seems an odd compromise to me , but hey ho Shimano know their stuff.

  42. #3092
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    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Interesting whilst the rear mech is wireless , it is connected by a wire to the front mech as they are both connected to the same battery! Seems an odd compromise to me , but hey ho Shimano know their stuff.
    I'd guess that's because of Srams IP.

  43. #3093
    To be honest it would be nicer if they sorted out their supply chain and actually delivered some of the current components. If youíre trying to get 105 or Ultegra spares at the moment thereís a minimum ) month wait.

  44. #3094
    Grand Master 100thmonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meesterbond View Post
    To be honest it would be nicer if they sorted out their supply chain and actually delivered some of the current components. If youíre trying to get 105 or Ultegra spares at the moment thereís a minimum ) month wait.
    I agree. Both bike shops and sellers have got greedy this year and it wont go unnoticed by the loyal. Production has already returned to pre covid levels with overtime welcome by all to compensate for lack of earnings. That coupled with delivery improving should return some bike shops arrogance and cockyness back to an acceptable level.

    Moving forward you wont be able to buy a decent mechanical groupset within 3 years all 105/Ultegra/Dura Ace will be electric only.

    I also think we will see a fairly healthy supply of Rim Brakes sales for quite a while if not forever.


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    For Their Tomorrow, We Gave Our Today"

  45. #3095
    Craftsman HookedSeven's Avatar
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    Went to the flea market this morning which is normally 90% clothes and 10% overpriced toys and assorted crap. Did manage to find something rather cool though, a seemingly all original Suntour XC Pro / TXL21 / Wheelsmith front wheel from I guess around 92. I think these were spec‘ed on bikes like the original Specialized M2 works so pretty top-end for the time. A bit of a bargain at €3 !




  46. #3096
    Quote Originally Posted by ~dadam02~ View Post
    Which BORG's did you go for? I'm looking to upgrade my current wheelset (DT Swiss E1800) and keep coming back to the BORG45's. Reading loads of good feedback online.
    I literally just bought the 45s replacing my DT E1800s on my BMC. Will let you know.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  47. #3097
    Master ~dadam02~'s Avatar
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    Just began winter bike prep (how depressing), finally got round to putting on my 32mm gp 4 seasons which replaced a set of 38mm continental sport contacts and the difference is night and day. The 4 seasons are so much quicker than the outgoing set of wheels, lots of fun to ride so thanks to those who recommended these tyres. Got a pair of mudguards on their way so those will be installed at the weeekend then the gravel bike is ready to go for worse weather.



    Quote Originally Posted by PawG View Post
    I literally just bought the 45s replacing my DT E1800s on my BMC. Will let you know.
    Ha, how about that. How long did you have to wait for them? Definitely interested to hear how you get on with the switch.

    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Hi Dadam sorry I didnt see this question earlier . I went for Borg 26 2.1 with sealed hubs. I didnt need the deep section and it was my first venture into custom built wheels. I had them fitted in April and from day 1 they have been true. Borg heat relieve there wheels post spoke tensioning so there is no ď pinging ď or spokes loosening off. As its my summer bike and competes with two others I have only done about 5->800 miles on them , but they have been great. In the first couple of rides my Strava pbs improved by about 15 secs on say 5 min sections consistently.

    They are lovely for climbing and still give a compliant ride.

    Lastly Malcom Borg is so easy to deal with, email enquiries are replied either same day or latest next day. Often he replies around 10pm the same day. Build lead time was 3.5 weeks and they delivered on that.

    Hope this helps even if I didnt go for the 45ís

    Steve
    Thanks for that info
    Last edited by ~dadam02~; 7th September 2021 at 07:36.

  48. #3098
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    480

    TZ Cycling/Bike Appreciation thread!

    As much as I love my bike I sometimes wish there was more branding on it







    Iíve got some new decals coming today

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/STAR-SAM-...-127635-2958-0
    Whatís everyoneís thoughts? Do it or donít do it. Will they be easy to remove if Iím not keen?
    Last edited by ManCityDG; 8th September 2021 at 10:17.

  49. #3099
    Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by ManCityDG View Post
    As much as I love my bike I sometimes wish there was more branding on it

    Iíve got some new decals coming today

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/STAR-SAM-...-127635-2958-0
    Whatís everyoneís thoughts? Do it or donít do it. Will they be easy to remove if Iím not keen?
    Nice bike, Iíd not bother but if you fancy it why not Ö easy to reverse.

  50. #3100
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Montello View Post
    Nice bike, Iíd not bother but if you fancy it why not Ö easy to reverse.
    As long as itís an easy reverse I will give it a go and post some pics 👍🏼

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