closing tag is in template navbar
timefactors watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Page 70 of 72 FirstFirst ... 20606869707172 LastLast
Results 3,451 to 3,500 of 3579

Thread: TZ Cycling/Bike Appreciation thread!

  1. #3451
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Leeds, England
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by Meesterbond View Post
    Knee pain can be caused by a load of different things... as a (really) general rule of thumb, if the pain is at the back of the knee then it's often that the saddle's too high, pain at the front and the saddle may be too low and pain at the side is often caused by the angle of the foot on the pedal.
    Thanks I will have a play around with things at the weekend when I do the coast to coast. Will also research 'egg beaters' and other spd type pedals. I'm in 2 minds for the event I'm training for as to attempt the full thing in the same trainers I'll be running in or change at transition and have cycle shoes / spd. Imhappy enough in toe clips but if cycle shoes n pedals offer a big enough advantage then may be wise to give them a go.

  2. #3452
    Master gunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by china View Post
    Still, it's a noticeable difference using proper road pedals. The larger surface, lower stack, stronger connection - it just somehow feels better. Might be partly due to the very close fitting road shoes too, my gravel shoes have more space for a thicker sock.
    I'd say that's a personal point of view.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

  3. #3453
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Scottish Borders
    Posts
    454
    Blog Entries
    1
    Bought a pair of Lake mtb shoes for gravel bike last week picked up in sale on sportpursuit ...never worn such a comfy shoe in all the years I've been riding and moved up from dhb bib shorts to castelli,don't think I will buy anything else from now on.

    Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk

  4. #3454
    Quote Originally Posted by fierbois16 View Post
    Thanks I will have a play around with things at the weekend when I do the coast to coast. Will also research 'egg beaters' and other spd type pedals. I'm in 2 minds for the event I'm training for as to attempt the full thing in the same trainers I'll be running in or change at transition and have cycle shoes / spd. Imhappy enough in toe clips but if cycle shoes n pedals offer a big enough advantage then may be wise to give them a go.

    The biggest issue I've found in trainers is that the soles are so soft, your foot almost bends round the pedal. Causes me all manner of issues. Even on a mountain bike where I'm using flats, specific mtb shoes have a much stiffer sole so I don't get the mid-foot pain after a few miles.
    For anything longer than a super-sprint tri I'd still look at proper cycling shoes.

    As for egg-beaters etc, with such a small contact point it again comes down to the stiffness of the shoe. Provided the sole is stiff enough they're fine for road. They did dedicated road pedals for a while (Quatros I think they were called). I used them for several years and they were fine but from memory didn't sell very well and were discontinued. I think I've still got some Candys, Mallets and those Quatros in the garage somewhere! My only issue was that once the cleat started to wear, the 'clip-in' became a bit vague. You didn't get the nice confirming click you get with some of the other makes. I've tried most makes and ended up with Speedplay (now owned by Wahoo) on the road, Cranks Bros Candys on the cross bike and flats off road.

  5. #3455
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    18,614



    Specialized S-Works Shoes for me. The pair of MTB at the front must be 10+ years old and still bombproof. Like wearing slippers on a bike, rock solid soles for total power transfer and just perfect comfort in the uppers.

  6. #3456
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    928
    Bought a hammerhead Karoo 2 having not owned a cycling computer more complex than a cat eye with a magnet on the spokes.

    I enjoyed using it remarkably more than expected! It was beautiful to be able to explore new routes and see new sights so easily! Really looking forward to going further afield than my usual three staple routes!

    Anyone any tips? Or good routes to import? Recommended routing software?

  7. #3457
    Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North Wales
    Posts
    3,208
    Quote Originally Posted by jeepie View Post
    Bought a hammerhead Karoo 2 having not owned a cycling computer more complex than a cat eye with a magnet on the spokes.

    I enjoyed using it remarkably more than expected! It was beautiful to be able to explore new routes and see new sights so easily! Really looking forward to going further afield than my usual three staple routes!

    Anyone any tips? Or good routes to import? Recommended routing software?
    I use Komoot, only as it was bundled with my Wahoo computer. I used to be you get the mapping for your area free. Then if you want to venture to another area you buy that. On my bolt head unit komoot gives me detailed instructions and turn by turn guidance ( bit like on a car system) i bought Wales I think that was £6 lake district was 3/4 quid.

    Key thing is to do some research to check it will run as a companion app with your Karoo 2

  8. #3458
    Master
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    1,264
    Quote Originally Posted by gunner View Post
    I'd say that's a personal point of view.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk
    Yes, I just wanted to point out that it can feel better and different. I've used many different MTB pedals, and while they are good, they don't feel the same as proper road pedals - I guess that's why road pedals are still sold.

  9. #3459
    Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    4,173
    Re cleats...

    I would say re cleats if you are at the more premium end of the market in terms of shoes there's probably not much in it, but at the cheaper end some people complain of hot spots on their feet with the smaller SPD cleat especially on longer rides which is something I have noticed myself.

    SPDs are a bit easier to clip into and more importantly unclip from than SPD SLs (on my CX I can unclip and get my foot down in time to save a slide).

    Other advantage of SPDs over SPD SLs is you can get shoes with the cleat recessed so easier to walk in.

    I would say if you are starting out go SPD but if you are more experienced/looking to do bigger distances consider SPD SL (or of course Look Keo which is what I have).

    Just my personal view of things...

  10. #3460
    Master
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    4,173
    And in other news rode the Isle of Wight yesterday, what a beautiful (but tough!) route, thoroughly recommended if you get a chance to do it 👍

  11. #3461
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    NW Leics
    Posts
    7,280
    Quote Originally Posted by fierbois16 View Post
    Tanks, it was the extra cost of shoes that put me off. I was surprised the bike didn't come with pedals when I bought it so just went with the basics. Interesting you mention knee pain, I've found biking has caused some soreness which I wasn't expecting. I thought it would be less stressful on the knees than running.
    It is - but it's important to get the saddle height right, especially. Don't mash too much, get the cadence right. And make sure your cleats are well-adjusted.

  12. #3462
    Master ~dadam02~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    N/A
    Posts
    3,697
    Blog Entries
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by monogroover View Post
    It is - but it's important to get the saddle height right, especially. Don't mash too much, get the cadence right. And make sure your cleats are well-adjusted.
    This, I was riding for ages with sore knees, a small tweak of the saddle (higher) and not had it since. Amazing what a small adjustment can make.

  13. #3463
    Master gunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by SimonH View Post
    Re cleats...

    I would say re cleats if you are at the more premium end of the market in terms of shoes there's probably not much in it, but at the cheaper end some people complain of hot spots on their feet with the smaller SPD cleat especially on longer rides which is something I have noticed myself.

    SPDs are a bit easier to clip into and more importantly unclip from than SPD SLs (on my CX I can unclip and get my foot down in time to save a slide).

    Other advantage of SPDs over SPD SLs is you can get shoes with the cleat recessed so easier to walk in.

    I would say if you are starting out go SPD but if you are more experienced/looking to do bigger distances consider SPD SL (or of course Look Keo which is what I have).

    Just my personal view of things...
    Agree on the shoes making a big difference.

    My old specialized MTB shoes used to flex around the pedal. The ones below on the other hand have the same carbon sole as the road shoe and got me from London to Cannes in comfort.


  14. #3464
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Leeds, England
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by ~dadam02~ View Post
    This, I was riding for ages with sore knees, a small tweak of the saddle (higher) and not had it since. Amazing what a small adjustment can make.
    Thanks for all the suggestions. I'm doing the way of the roses at the weekend so plenty of miles to work on those adjustments. Interesting comment re cadence and knee pain, I perhaps stomp more than spin if that makes sense.

  15. #3465
    Grand Master magirus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Up North hinny
    Posts
    38,392
    Another Sidi shoes and Shimano SPD user here, but I use XTR trail pedals on my bikes with no discomfort issues at all. That's 2 road bikes and 1 MTB.

  16. #3466
    Quote Originally Posted by SimonH View Post
    Re cleats...

    I would say re cleats if you are at the more premium end of the market in terms of shoes there's probably not much in it, but at the cheaper end some people complain of hot spots on their feet with the smaller SPD cleat especially on longer rides which is something I have noticed myself.

    SPDs are a bit easier to clip into and more importantly unclip from than SPD SLs (on my CX I can unclip and get my foot down in time to save a slide).

    Other advantage of SPDs over SPD SLs is you can get shoes with the cleat recessed so easier to walk in.

    I would say if you are starting out go SPD but if you are more experienced/looking to do bigger distances consider SPD SL (or of course Look Keo which is what I have).

    If anyone is after a very light (titanium, 216g for the pair) pair of SPD compatible pedals, I have got a set of these for sale:

    https://xpedo.com/product/pedals/mtb/m-force-8/

    I used to use SPD on my road bike but have now moved over to Look. PM me if you’re interested.

  17. #3467
    Master gunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Bravo73 View Post
    If anyone is after a very light (titanium, 216g for the pair) pair of SPD compatible pedals, I have got a set of these for sale:

    https://xpedo.com/product/pedals/mtb/m-force-8/

    I used to use SPD on my road bike but have now moved over to Look. PM me if you’re interested.
    Exactly what I use on my road bike. If you want to go even lighter, making them single sided takes them down to about 170g.

  18. #3468
    Quote Originally Posted by Bravo73 View Post
    If anyone is after a very light (titanium, 216g for the pair) pair of SPD compatible pedals, I have got a set of these for sale:

    https://xpedo.com/product/pedals/mtb/m-force-8/

    I used to use SPD on my road bike but have now moved over to Look. PM me if you’re interested.
    When you say "SPD compatible" - do they/can they use Shimano SPD cleats, or are they their own SPD-style cleats? I like having the same shoes (and thus the same cleats) for every bike.

  19. #3469
    They use SPD cleats.

    I said ‘SPD compatible’ because they aren’t made by Shimano (obviously).

  20. #3470
    Quote Originally Posted by Bravo73 View Post
    They use SPD cleats.

    I said ‘SPD compatible’ because they aren’t made by Shimano (obviously).
    Thanks. PM incoming.

  21. #3471
    Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    2,545
    Blog Entries
    1
    I am on a nostalgia trip - I love old, steel framed bikes. This is an old Dawes, repainted and converted from 5 to 12 gears. It has new, hand built wheels, new tyres, cables etc. It won't break any records - though neither would I - but is so comfortable on Hertfordshire's bumpy back roads. For £120, it feels like a good stepping stone to a decent new bike one day.



    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

  22. #3472
    Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North Wales
    Posts
    3,208
    Quote Originally Posted by JonRA View Post
    I am on a nostalgia trip - I love old, steel framed bikes. This is an old Dawes, repainted and converted from 5 to 12 gears. It has new, hand built wheels, new tyres, cables etc. It won't break any records - though neither would I - but is so comfortable on Hertfordshire's bumpy back roads. For £120, it feels like a good stepping stone to a decent new bike one day.



    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk
    Steel frame hand built wheels downshifters, whats not to like.

    Steve

  23. #3473
    Master Templogin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Shetland
    Posts
    2,094
    Quote Originally Posted by JonRA View Post
    I am on a nostalgia trip - I love old, steel framed bikes. This is an old Dawes, repainted and converted from 5 to 12 gears. It has new, hand built wheels, new tyres, cables etc. It won't break any records - though neither would I - but is so comfortable on Hertfordshire's bumpy back roads. For £120, it feels like a good stepping stone to a decent new bike one day.



    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk
    Nice looking bike. Are those Campag brakes and levers?

  24. #3474
    Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    2,545
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by higham5 View Post
    Steel frame hand built wheels downshifters, whats not to like.

    Steve
    I agree - I know that the friction shifts aren't as slick as properly indexed brifters but they're effective and very satisfying to use. Reminds me of how I learned to use the gears :)


    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

  25. #3475
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    18,614
    Quote Originally Posted by JonRA View Post
    I am on a nostalgia trip - I love old, steel framed bikes. This is an old Dawes, repainted and converted from 5 to 12 gears. It has new, hand built wheels, new tyres, cables etc. It won't break any records - though neither would I - but is so comfortable on Hertfordshire's bumpy back roads. For £120, it feels like a good stepping stone to a decent new bike one day.





    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk
    Lovely that Jon, proper old steed looking

  26. #3476
    Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    2,545
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Templogin View Post
    Nice looking bike. Are those Campag brakes and levers?
    Sadly not - it's a bit of a hotch-potch. The brakes are Weinmann - they look a bit oversized but are very effective. The levers are Star (never heard of them) - the stem is Sakae and the bars are engraved Champion. All old bits from a parts bin, I think.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk

  27. #3477
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    18,614
    Get some easy to maintain Campgnolo Deltas on it!!!!!!

    Most over engineered brakes in the universe

    https://www.bikehugger.com/posts/the...o-delta-brake/

  28. #3478
    Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    2,545
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by 100thmonkey View Post
    Lovely that Jon, proper old steed looking
    Thanks 100M - there's nothing modern about it whatsover!

    Quote Originally Posted by 100thmonkey View Post
    Get some easy to maintain Campgnolo Deltas on it!!!!!!

    Most over engineered brakes in the universe

    https://www.bikehugger.com/posts/the...o-delta-brake/


    Good grief- I counted at least 31parts in the pic of the almost dismantled brake! They look great though.

  29. #3479
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    172
    Lovely Jon, love the rake of the forks. I would however cut that brake cable a bit - just in case it gets knocked into the wheel.
    I had a bike with cottered cranks as a Uni run around - Dad's first bike.

    Anyone else doing the London Essex 100 this weekend?
    Last edited by wallyuk; 17th May 2022 at 07:30.

  30. #3480
    Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    2,545
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by wallyuk View Post
    Lovely Jon, love the rake of the forks.
    Thanks wally - I love these forks and their ability to soak up bumps. Whenever I look at the majority of modern steel-framed bikes I'm put off by the common use of straight(ish) carbon forks. I'll have to give them a try some time but I can't convince myself that they will be as comfortable (and I doubt that at my low level of performance, I'll be able to detect any benefit from the lower weight).

    Also I think the mix of steel frame and carbon forks looks all wrong. Modern bikes can look amazing and are technically incredible but I don't think new style forks and old style frames are a good visual mix.

  31. #3481
    Master Templogin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Shetland
    Posts
    2,094
    Ah yes, Weinmann. I had bikes with those brakes in the dim and distant past. I lived to tell the tale so they can't be that bad!

  32. #3482
    Craftsman skmark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St Albans
    Posts
    776
    Quote Originally Posted by JonRA View Post
    Thanks wally - I love these forks and their ability to soak up bumps. Whenever I look at the majority of modern steel-framed bikes I'm put off by the common use of straight(ish) carbon forks. I'll have to give them a try some time but I can't convince myself that they will be as comfortable (and I doubt that at my low level of performance, I'll be able to detect any benefit from the lower weight).

    Also I think the mix of steel frame and carbon forks looks all wrong. Modern bikes can look amazing and are technically incredible but I don't think new style forks and old style frames are a good visual mix.
    Ooooohhhhh I don't know........opportunity for a gratuitous shot of my bike. Still lovin it ;o)






  33. #3483
    Master
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    2,545
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by skmark View Post
    Ooooohhhhh I don't know........opportunity for a gratuitous shot of my bike. Still lovin it ;o)





    I'll concede that does look nice - I think, perhaps because the frame looks quite chunky for steel, so is a similar thickness (at least sideways on) to the forks.


    Edit- It looks like your bike made Rouke's gallery? https://www.rourke.biz/new/gallery.php Very nice
    Last edited by JonRA; 17th May 2022 at 10:19.

  34. #3484
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Leeds, England
    Posts
    218
    Completed the coast to coast on Sunday following the 'Way of the roses' route which snakes across Lancashire and Yorkshire, starting in Morecambe and ending in Bridlington a distance of 170 miles. A very hilly first day, stopping just short of Ripon, roughly 70 miles and 2000m (?) of climbing stunning scenery along the majority of the route and mostly quiet country lanes. The second day only featured one noticeable climb out of Pocklington but then pretty flat all the way to Bridlington. We passed through some nice villages but compared to the first day the route was less scenic. A couple of minor detours meant we ended up doing 103 miles but generally the route was well sign posted with opportunities to stop at numerous cafes if in need of a pit stop.

    This was a training week end for an event in September. Tried a few adjustments to the bike and riding style after receiving tips on this thread, the result being noticeably less sore knees! I'm a runner and pretty new to cycling, i had only done 430 miles on the bike prior to this weekend with the longest ride being 50 miles but managed to maintain an average of 12mph over the 2 days. This puts me close to my target to reach the cutoffs in September.

    Thanks for the tips, they really helped. If anyone is looking for a different coast to coast route then I would recommend the Way of the Roses

  35. #3485
    Master Chukas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Highlands
    Posts
    1,145
    https://www.merlincycles.com/giro-ca...es-208714.html

    Just bought these bad boys and realised I need to get a pair of cleats to go with them.
    Are Shimano the ones to go for, sorry for my naivety 😬

  36. #3486
    Craftsman skmark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St Albans
    Posts
    776
    Quote Originally Posted by Chukas View Post
    https://www.merlincycles.com/giro-ca...es-208714.html

    Just bought these bad boys and realised I need to get a pair of cleats to go with them.
    Are Shimano the ones to go for, sorry for my naivety 
    That depends upon what your pedals are.....they need to match with your pedals and not the shoes.

  37. #3487
    Master Chukas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Highlands
    Posts
    1,145
    Quote Originally Posted by skmark View Post
    That depends upon what your pedals are.....they need to match with your pedals and not the shoes.
    Cheers


    Sent from my iPhone using TZ-UK mobile app

  38. #3488
    Quote Originally Posted by fierbois16 View Post

    If anyone is looking for a different coast to coast route then I would recommend the Way of the Roses
    I'm playing with the idea of doing this later this summer, so thought I would ask a few Q's if I may.

    Did you stay in a B&B/hotel overnight or camp? Any general tips on the route / anything you would change having completed the route?

    Thanks in advance.

  39. #3489
    Master
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Yorkshireman at heart
    Posts
    2,577
    Blog Entries
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by 100thmonkey View Post
    Get some easy to maintain Campgnolo Deltas on it!!!!!!

    Most over engineered brakes in the universe

    https://www.bikehugger.com/posts/the...o-delta-brake/
    I had some C-Record Deltas on my road bike back in the early 90’s….they looked awesome, but they weren’t very effective at slowing me down

  40. #3490
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Unknown
    Posts
    3,978
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by trident-7 View Post
    I had some C-Record Deltas on my road bike back in the early 90’s….they looked awesome, but they weren’t very effective at slowing me down
    Their breaking power was awful. Don’t know how they ever made it to market.

  41. #3491
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Leeds, England
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by den77 View Post
    I'm playing with the idea of doing this later this summer, so thought I would ask a few Q's if I may.

    Did you stay in a B&B/hotel overnight or camp? Any general tips on the route / anything you would change having completed the route?

    Thanks in advance.
    Hi,
    As you probably already know the big hills are all in the first half, namely Settle and then the climb out of Burnsall to Greenhow, each requires effort but i would say they are manageable. We stayed at the Sawley arms in Sawley, about 1.5m off the route and just short of Ripon and after the climbs of the first day i think this was good stop off point at around 70 miles into the course. Sawley arms is a bit pricey but the rooms were clean and the food good so i would recommend it.

    The second day is pretty flat, the occasional hill, the only real climb is just after Pocklington but this is nothing compared to the first day and didn't present a problem even on tired legs. We did 103 miles on the second day, this was a bit of a slog, although you pass through some nice villages the best scenery is definitely on day 1. After Pocklington the way of the roses takes a winding route following the quieter track and lanes, i read comments on this saying it was unnecessarily winding. After completing the route i can appreciate this point but perhaps fatigue had just eroded my patience by then.

    The route is mostly country lanes and cycleways and the occasional short section of bigger road usually just to access the next small lane. There was one section of off road, namely a well compacted field and gravely track. Not a problem on a dry day but may be muddy when wet.

    I did the route on a Trek Domane AL3, comfortable for long days and the wider tyre helped on the rougher sections. I'm not an experienced cyclist but i am reasonably fit. Doing the course over 2 days was a challenge (for me), 3 and i would have felt short changed. We had good weather, dry and not too hot i think this helped. The route is well sign posted although we went off course slightly coming out of York but soon picked it up again.

    I did the C2C Whitehaven to Sunderland many years ago but i think i prefer this route, especially the first day. I would say 2 days is a challenge, 3 would allow a more time to enjoy the scenery. Good luck

  42. #3492
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Nottingham, UK.
    Posts
    623
    Quote Originally Posted by Chukas View Post
    https://www.merlincycles.com/giro-ca...es-208714.html

    Just bought these bad boys and realised I need to get a pair of cleats to go with them.
    Are Shimano the ones to go for, sorry for my naivety 
    Those shoes will take any cleats. The slots in the centre are for SPD type which are commonly used for MTB pedals. The 3 screw holes are for SPD-SL type also known as road type. So the world is your oyster with those shoes.
    So now its down to what pedals you have already and if you are happy with them, and also if you are likely to do some walking (hills, tracks etc) because SPD-SL cleats are not great for much more than teetering around at a cafe stop.

  43. #3493
    Master
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North Wales
    Posts
    3,208
    Quote Originally Posted by barreti View Post
    Those shoes will take any cleats.

    SPD-SL cleats are not great for much more than teetering around at a cafe stop.
    Finest moment of Spd Sl cleats is the extra energy you summon up from goodness knows where, when you are grinding up a hill and you think “ I f I have to walk up this Ill trash the £20 cleats” :)

  44. #3494
    Quote Originally Posted by fierbois16 View Post
    Hi,
    As you probably already know the big hills are all in the first half, namely Settle and then the climb out of Burnsall to Greenhow, each requires effort but i would say they are manageable. We stayed at the Sawley arms in Sawley, about 1.5m off the route and just short of Ripon and after the climbs of the first day i think this was good stop off point at around 70 miles into the course. Sawley arms is a bit pricey but the rooms were clean and the food good so i would recommend it.
    Great thanks for this and the other info. Life permitting I hope to do it in September.

  45. #3495
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    18,614
    Test rode 2 bikes today and will chose one for the summer so might have a spare Tarmac Pro SL6 available if anyone wants something special.


  46. #3496
    Master gunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    3,595
    Great colour, similar to my Cipollini.

    Quote Originally Posted by 100thmonkey View Post
    Test rode 2 bikes today and will chose one for the summer so might have a spare Tarmac Pro SL6 available if anyone wants something special.


  47. #3497
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    18,614

    TZ Cycling/Bike Appreciation thread!

    Quote Originally Posted by gunner View Post
    Great colour, similar to my Cipollini.
    Di2 with Ew Unit, power meter cranks and oh those gorgeous 50mm Carbon Rovals on that colour changing chameleon paint.

    Should I or is this one to frame!!!!!

  48. #3498
    Craftsman Byron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Hampshire
    Posts
    470
    That’s a lovely SL6

  49. #3499
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Plymouth, Devon
    Posts
    258
    6 years old next month.
    Fresh back from service.

    Sent from my SM-A725F using Tapatalk

  50. #3500
    Grand Master
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    18,614
    Quote Originally Posted by deepdivedaz View Post
    6 years old next month.
    Fresh back from service.

    Sent from my SM-A725F using Tapatalk
    Ohhhh you like it Hard and fast!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Do Not Sell My Personal Information