closing tag is in template navbar
timefactors watches



TZ-UK Fundraiser
Results 1 to 25 of 25

Thread: Decking - Composote or standard decking

  1. #1
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Warwickshire
    Posts
    744

    Decking - Composote or standard decking

    Am looking at replacing my horrible slabs with some decking at some point. My preference is a dark wood as it looks more inviting over the Winter months.

    Have looked at the new composite decking but it looks a bit of a faff to lay with the clips. What do people here typically prefer?

    Also, am looking at laying it myself. I am OK with DIY / flooring and looking at various YouTube vids the hardest part looks to be making the raised frame that the deck is attached too.

  2. #2
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Winchester
    Posts
    1,252
    I've had standard decking for many years and from before composite decking became available.

    It's held up pretty well but I went for the thicker boards and have re-treated it every year. The reality is that it's the timber frame it sits on that decays first, as there is no way of topping up the rot treatment, so I would say 10 years would be good for a well constructed timber frame that rests on pads to keep most of it from sitting in standing water.

    I would personally look at composite if I was planning on being somewhere for more than about 7 years. By that time issues could be emerging with a timber deck but composite should still look good with just the occasional pressure wash. It is a major pain having to replace wooden joists as not only do you have to take it all apart, you have to re-build it in precisely the same manner as the original structure.

  3. #3
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Oxford, Oxfordshire
    Posts
    296
    I looked into it but the cost was prohibitive , for me it was likely to cost at least 5 times what conventional timber decking would

    There are some stunning products out there though , I got a free sample from these guys and its lovely stuff

    https://www.millboard.co.uk/

    Our decking is 15 years old and looking tatty now so its a job for me over the winter, but not likely to still be here in 10 years


  4. #4
    Master senwar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    3,557
    I had decking installed just over 2yrs ago. I wasn't sure whether I wanted it long term or not, and we'd just moved in so wasn't sure if we'd settle. Cost of composite was about 4x more so I went traditional.

    I'll be ripping it up to be honest within the next year or so and replacing with composite. Just more durable in my opinion but obviously only worthy if going to be there a long time

  5. #5
    I just had our decking removed. In winter with a little bit of algae the rain make it more Slippery than an ice rink. Go composite or stone .

  6. #6
    My folks have just spent £10k on some trex decking. Looks lovely, 25 year life, non slip, fitted very well..... and would be my choice, except for I keep hearing £10k!! £10k!!!

  7. #7
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Peterhead
    Posts
    129
    Hi I'd go with the composite decking everyday over timber. A couple of points to add before going the composite route. If your told no maintenance then that's not technically true, bird poop is just one of the joys of both types of decking, especially if you live on the coast with giant seagulls dropping presents. Also the deckboards are held with screws & clips which can over time with expansion and contraction need re-fixed or replaced. Before the decking goes down treat the timber with the best quality treatment you can get as once it's down its down, also staple dpc over the top of timber joists. The 25 year guarantee on most is completely useless, check the small print and after the first 2 year the refund cost for product failure is peanuts.

    Trex, millboard and fiberon are very good boards. Also try newtech wood which is coming in at a very reasonable price point now.

    Sent from my STF-L09 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    521
    Composite for sure. But for the correct stuff you will pay a lot. But never needs staining and fade guarantee. Worth the money IMO.

    Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    london
    Posts
    56
    I would go for composite if it's within budget. Much more durable and overall a better product to use for decking.

    Sent from my SM-N950F using TZ-UK mobile app

  10. #10
    Grand Master number2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North and South.
    Posts
    19,985
    Rats love decking, underneath it's safe and they're close to food sources,,
    "Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's enemy action."

  11. #11
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Warwickshire
    Posts
    744
    Thanks for the feedback people. Weíve only just moved in and wonít be going anywhere for at least 15yrs so sounds like composite is the way forward.

    Floor space is 5m x 6.5m so hopefully not too expensive, although initial browsing suggests x2.5 cost of traditional decking.

  12. #12
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Bournemouth, United Kingdom
    Posts
    559
    Thought about going with a higher end timber deck like ipe? Stuff is as hard as nails and much nicer looking that tantalised painted. Decks can last a very long time without rotting and Iíd always prefer a natural material over a plastic based composite. Thatís just me though!

  13. #13
    Personally I've never liked the stuff, high maintenance. If I was going to do it I'd look at putting something permanent in the ground at least. Wood in the ground is a nightmare unless it's really high quality stuff. If you really want it are concrete or composite posts in the ground an option?

  14. #14
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Oxford, Oxfordshire
    Posts
    296
    I dont believe conventional decking is high maintenance , I treated mine twice in 15 years , my mums was down for 10 years without any treatment (She moved but the decking is probably still fine)

    But as said £10-£12k on decking is a lot of money when you can do it for £2k with timber

  15. #15
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    South, U.K.
    Posts
    132
    Ive fitted both traditional timber and composite decking. I prefer the composite for the lack of maintenance and it does not get slippery/slimey when wet.

    a couple of other things to consider.

    For longevity the subframe design is every thing. It is not wise to put any timber frame in direct contact with the ground. It can be packed off using tiles or slate and I normally add a bit of dpc membrane for good measure. Prepare the ground below and cover with a geo textile membrane and then 20mm shingle to prevent weeds and aid drainage. You can buy composite bearers that can be laid directly to the ground but they are expensive and have no structural strength (need to be fully supported along their entire length, eg on flat ground). If you wanted to go straight over your existing slabs these might be worth considering tho.

    Composite varies in quality and the solid boards are more durable than the hollow core boards which will shatter if something sharp/heavy is dropped on them.

    The spacings of the subframe joists need to be closer for composite boards (around 300mm centres as opposed to 400/500 centres).

    Hope this helps

  16. #16
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Northants UK
    Posts
    261
    If £ isn't an issue go composite, looks great. Far to expensive for me though.

  17. #17
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Warwickshire
    Posts
    744
    Quote Originally Posted by Comet View Post
    Ive fitted both traditional timber and composite decking. I prefer the composite for the lack of maintenance and it does not get slippery/slimey when wet.

    a couple of other things to consider.

    For longevity the subframe design is every thing. It is not wise to put any timber frame in direct contact with the ground. It can be packed off using tiles or slate and I normally add a bit of dpc membrane for good measure. Prepare the ground below and cover with a geo textile membrane and then 20mm shingle to prevent weeds and aid drainage. You can buy composite bearers that can be laid directly to the ground but they are expensive and have no structural strength (need to be fully supported along their entire length, eg on flat ground). If you wanted to go straight over your existing slabs these might be worth considering tho.

    Composite varies in quality and the solid boards are more durable than the hollow core boards which will shatter if something sharp/heavy is dropped on them.

    The spacings of the subframe joists need to be closer for composite boards (around 300mm centres as opposed to 400/500 centres).

    Hope this helps
    Some great advice here, thanks.

    Was planning on the following;
    1) - Weed spray to existing slabs (to kill off the main offenders)
    2) - Weed-membrane over slabs (to stop weed coming through)
    3) - Loose shingle (to keep the membrane down)
    4) - 4x2 tanalised timber for the subframe
    5) - Something like this to raise the timber subframe from the slabs / membrane = https://www.silvatimber.co.uk/concre...eck-block.html


    Just looked at IPE deck timber - very nice, this may be the way forward if I do go that route.

  18. #18
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Winchester
    Posts
    1,252
    Quote Originally Posted by gavsw20 View Post
    Some great advice here, thanks.

    Was planning on the following;
    1) - Weed spray to existing slabs (to kill off the main offenders)
    2) - Weed-membrane over slabs (to stop weed coming through)
    3) - Loose shingle (to keep the membrane down)
    4) - 4x2 tanalised timber for the subframe
    5) - Something like this to raise the timber subframe from the slabs / membrane = https://www.silvatimber.co.uk/concre...eck-block.html


    Just looked at IPE deck timber - very nice, this may be the way forward if I do go that route.
    I would look at 5x2 tantalised timber for the subframe. You don't need the extra structural strength but the subframe is the weak point of any timber deck and will rot to the point that eventually it will rot all the way through and snap.

    For a little extra cash the 5x2 will remain structurally sound for a fair bit longer

  19. #19
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    South, U.K.
    Posts
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by thegreatdogwood View Post
    I would look at 5x2 tantalised timber for the subframe. You don't need the extra structural strength but the subframe is the weak point of any timber deck and will rot to the point that eventually it will rot all the way through and snap.

    For a little extra cash the 5x2 will remain structurally sound for a fair bit longer
    IMHO the only reason to go to a deeper timber is for a greater span. 4x2 should be supported every 1m. Using larger joists just means the unsupported spans can be greater. To prevent rot, treat all cut ends and make sure that the water can drain away from the timber.

  20. #20
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    South, U.K.
    Posts
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by gavsw20 View Post
    Some great advice here, thanks.

    Was planning on the following;
    1) - Weed spray to existing slabs (to kill off the main offenders)
    2) - Weed-membrane over slabs (to stop weed coming through)
    3) - Loose shingle (to keep the membrane down)
    4) - 4x2 tanalised timber for the subframe
    5) - Something like this to raise the timber subframe from the slabs / membrane = https://www.silvatimber.co.uk/concre...eck-block.html


    Just looked at IPE deck timber - very nice, this may be the way forward if I do go that route.
    An IPE deck does look lovely.
    we have also used these shoes before when decking over a flat roof
    https://www.silvatimber.co.uk/deckin...fix-joist.html

  21. #21
    Master
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Winchester
    Posts
    1,252
    Quote Originally Posted by Comet View Post
    IMHO the only reason to go to a deeper timber is for a greater span. 4x2 should be supported every 1m. Using larger joists just means the unsupported spans can be greater. To prevent rot, treat all cut ends and make sure that the water can drain away from the timber.
    Speaking from experience, even if you are super careful deck joists rot from the top. Mine stood off the ground on concrete pads at wide centres to optimise drainage but even being as careful with treatment as possible, the joists rotted from the top down until ultimately the sound wood left could not support the weight of the deck and it snapped. Unfortunately the actual design of a deck holds water in place on the top of the joists in the spacing between boards.

  22. #22
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    South, U.K.
    Posts
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by thegreatdogwood View Post
    Speaking from experience, even if you are super careful deck joists rot from the top. Mine stood off the ground on concrete pads at wide centres to optimise drainage but even being as careful with treatment as possible, the joists rotted from the top down until ultimately the sound wood left could not support the weight of the deck and it snapped. Unfortunately the actual design of a deck holds water in place on the top of the joists in the spacing between boards.
    Speaking as a carpenter with over 30 years experience I still wouldn't recommend that you beef something up because it will take longer to rot. It will still rot. There are many ways to prevent rot and prolong the life of the joists. Some environments will be worse than others tho and often ventilation is key here but also simple maintenance. For instance if moss and debris is left between the boards or the boards are fitted too tightly together the water will also hold on top of the joist and not drain due to capillary action. I have just removed a deck I installed 18 years ago and the sub frame was absolutely fine. In contrast, a friend of mine had a deck fitted less than 10 years ago which had rotted in one corner. It turns out the tenants had a dog that was using that area to pee on and together with lack of sunlight the joists below just deteriorated.

  23. #23
    Journeyman
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Peterhead
    Posts
    129
    Staple 4 inch dpc along the top of all joists before laying the deck boards. This helps a lot and covers the top of the joist which helps when your laying modern deck colours such as grey so your not looking at the treated timber through the gaps.

    Sent from my STF-L09 using Tapatalk

  24. #24
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Bournemouth, United Kingdom
    Posts
    559
    Definitely treat the fresh cut ends! Great tip

  25. #25
    Craftsman
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    South West, UK
    Posts
    980
    Surely wood is always going to look better. Natural Materials, generally always will. This is why I went for a cedar greenhouse.

    I understand itís convenient but you ever choose composite inside the house if all costs are equal?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •