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Thread: Anyone read any good books recently ?

  1. #51
    Guest
    There is a new Lee Child ? Why am I always the last to find out.
    Whats it called Jon?

  2. #52

    Manda Scott - Boudica Series

    Just finished Boudica - Dreaming the Bull, no two in the series. Dreaming the eagle was the first and the fourth is out soon.

    Very good reads - obviously about Boudica, good links into history and roman times.

    Well recommended.

    Also any of the Jonathan Kellerman books, detective thrillers set in the US.

  3. #53
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    Currently reading "The Tories, Conservatives and the nation state 1922-1997" by Alan Clark.

    Well written and interesting stuff .

    Finished "He kills coppers" enjoyed it, so want to get "The long firm" next. :)
    Cheers,
    Neil.

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  4. #54
    Journeyman
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve
    There is a new Lee Child ? Why am I always the last to find out.
    Whats it called Jon?
    Hi Steve , I think it's called "One Shot" and it should have been released in the UK on the 1st of April (later in the ' States ). I think there is a Lee Child dot com you can check out. Regards , Jon

  5. #55
    Guest
    aha...excellent..wonder if its in Borders here yet. Off to Cornwall for a short break..a new Jack Reacher would be perfect.
    Thanks!! :lol:

  6. #56
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    oh...bollocky bloody boos.
    Got the new book "one shot" in a Penzance bookery. Absolutely bloody brilliant. Couldn't figure out how it was going to develop...couldn't put the damned thing down. Got half way through...drove back to Cheshire tonight. Sodding left the damned book in Cornwall. :shock:

  7. #57
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    Hi Steve, if you're looking for sympathy, buy a dikshunery.My copy is still in Romania.It should be here this weekend,though.We are holding his cat to ransom,so i dont anticipate any problems with the exchange.I can probably tell you how it ends by Saturday( metric Monday out here) if you like.Nah,only joking.Regards,Jon.

  8. #58
    Hi again All,
    I've just finished reading "The Climb up to Hell" by Jack Olsen, about the attempted rescue of two German and two Italian Climbers from the North Face of the Eiger in 1957. It is a thoroughly gripping book, and I would recomend it to anyone. The copy I read was printed in 1962 so it may be a bit hard to get hold of, but I reckon it will be available via most libraries if not via Amazon or some other internet based search / aquire booksite.
    The best thing is that it is not a work of fiction and was written "at the time", I won't spoil it by saying who is rescued and who is not :wink:
    Cheers,
    Richie :wink:

  9. #59
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    I've recently read '1421, The year China discovered the world', by Gavin Menzies, a fascinating theory with a lot of strong supporting evidence and an excelent website accompanying the book with updates on the research

    http://www.1421.tv/index.asp

    I served in the Royal Navy as a Navigating Oficer for a number of years and this book made a lot of sense to me, there's been a Radio 4 programme recently on the same subject, but I missed it unfortunately.

    On a different tack an excellent read that I've recently finished is 'The Curious incident of the Dog in the Night' a brilliantly written story involving a 15 year old boy with Asbergers Syndrome, a form of Autism. Difficult one to explain, but funny, sad and fascinating all at once.

    Cheers

    James

  10. #60
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    Hi

    Agree with you, James, re "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time" - fascinating and a clever piece of writing.

    My own latest recommendations:

    "Two Sides of The Moon" by David Scott and Alexei Leonov - excellent read about the early Russian and US space programmes and the political background.
    Just to put this in perspective and to illustrate just how desperate the Americans were to get to the Moon first, remember Kennedy's speech that began the space race in earnest, including the words "and return them safely to earth"? Well, those words refer to the plan that was being mooted at the time, in desperation, to land astronauts on the Moon without having fully developed a method of getting them back! They intended to resupply the astronauts by rocket while they figured out a way to get them back...

    "Soldiers of Light" by Daniel Bergner. This is about the slaughter i nSierra Leone. Frightening book, very disturbing indeed. When the arm-chopping squads reached a village, an advance group would ask the people their preference: "Long sleeve or short sleeve?" According to the reply they would hack off the arm either at the shoulder or at the wrist.

    "Scribbling the Cat" by Alexandra Fuller.
    Yet another of my African related reads, this is an excellent and aften very funny book about post Colonial Africa, and also about one former Rhodesian soldier and the scars that fighting left on him.

    So far I am sticking quite well to my resolution just to read non-fiction and autobiography etc, might actually be learning something while I'm at it.

    Lots of great books out there, so little time.

    Si

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by brynglas
    I've recently read '1421, The year China discovered the world', by Gavin Menzies, a fascinating theory with a lot of strong supporting evidence and an excelent website accompanying the book with updates on the research

    http://www.1421.tv/index.asp

    I served in the Royal Navy as a Navigating Oficer for a number of years and this book made a lot of sense to me, there's been a Radio 4 programme recently on the same subject, but I missed it unfortunately.

    On a different tack an excellent read that I've recently finished is 'The Curious incident of the Dog in the Night' a brilliantly written story involving a 15 year old boy with Asbergers Syndrome, a form of Autism. Difficult one to explain, but funny, sad and fascinating all at once.

    Cheers

    James
    I read the Menzies' book recently. Simply fascinating, even for a person who has no naval qualifications.

    I'm going to read the latter book soon. My mum said I just must read it, it's great.

    I'm reading Fareed Zakaria's Future of Freedom currently. Highly recommended by friends of mine who claim they're Neoconservatives. A book that combines history, politics and economy - easy but still thoughtful reading.

    Unlike "Active Portfolio Management" (Grinold & Kahn) which is on my desk at work now. It seems to me it's easier to make money by writing books about investing rather than by investing itself. :D

  12. #62
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    Anyone like Jack Vance?
    His 1966 'The Eyes of the Overworld' is, in IMO, a fantasy classic.

  13. #63
    Master doug darter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swanbourne
    Last year on the forum, somebody mentioned a character in a book whose DNA matched the DNA on the Turin Shroud, can anyone remember what this was?

    Eddie
    Hi Eddie,

    I read a book last year, which had a very similar plot line...

    'The Miracle Strain' by Michael Cordy. Fiction.

    Deals with DNA extracted from religious relics in an effort to find the Messiah. Very good indeed, a great holiday book.

    I'll send you the copy if you want to read it. I know I can trust you, you returned the Dale Brown even though you didn't like it.

    Doug

  14. #64
    Master doug darter's Avatar
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    Hi,

    Most of my favourite authors/books have been mentioned, though I didn't see anything about Patrick Robinson.

    Great series of Hi Tech naval warfare books, written with the help of Sir Sandy Woodward.

    In my honest opinion, and I thought I would NEVER say this, better than Tom Clancy. Same genre, but a different class.

    Doug

  15. #65
    I just finished Max Hastings' Armageddon: The Battle for Germany 1944--45. It is one of the best overviews, if 600 pages is an overview, combining a discussion of activities on both fronts, including what happened to the civilian populations. He is a very good historian, I think.

    Best wishes,
    Bob

  16. #66
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    I'm currently in a SF phase, and British authors at that, so here's what I've been reading lately:

    - Charlie Stross: The Family Trade / The Hidden Family (heroine finds herself in a different world and [essentially] decides to get rich by taking advantage of the techological gap between worlds)

    - Richard Morgan: Woken Furies ("big guns" SF)

    - Alistair Reynolds: Century Rain (SF + crime noir)

    Kind regards
    mcdill

  17. #67
    Master doug darter's Avatar
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    I kinda hate to say it, but some of the best SF books I've ever read, were the 'lensman' series, by EE Smith. Not to everyones taste perhaps, but the technology is something special.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfrazier
    I just finished Max Hastings' Armageddon: The Battle for Germany 1944--45. It is one of the best overviews, if 600 pages is an overview, combining a discussion of activities on both fronts, including what happened to the civilian populations. He is a very good historian, I think.

    Best wishes,
    Bob
    I agree, I really enjoyed this book. Max Hastings does well as he uses his journalistic skills well in this context, and also he has some very good experience of his own as a war reporter which helps in his approach.

    James

  19. #69
    Hi again All,
    Well, I just finished reading "After the Quake" by Haruki Murakami, a top read, somehow reminded by it of Phil Dick, strangeness in familiar sorroundings. Especially the story about the frog. I am just starting Norwegian Wood so thanks for the recomendation whichever of the forumers it was,
    Cheers,
    Richie

  20. #70
    Master worlok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfrazier
    ----snip-----

    Henry Kissinger's Diplomacy

    ----snip------
    I was watching Muppet Treasure Island DVD with my kid and when they were going through Billy Bones' (Billy Connolly) sea chest that was one of the gag things they pulled out. LOL! I love that stuff that goes over kids heads in kid movies but gives us parents a chuckle. :lol:

  21. #71
    I have recently finished reading "The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt" and "Theodore Rex" by Edmund Morris. Both books are a great read!

  22. #72
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    I'm reading "The Lost City" by Clive Cussler.

    Very boring so far. :?
    Cheers,
    Neil.

    My Speedmaster website:

    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  23. #73
    Currently reading "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince". Cracking read so far.

  24. #74
    Master chrisb's Avatar
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    I'm working my way through the "Sharpe" series by Bernard Cornwell, good reading 8)

  25. #75
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    I'm reading Moby Dick but I just bought 'The Historian' by Elisabeth Kostova which is getting rave reviews so I'm looking forward to that next

    cheers
    Alan :)

  26. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisb
    I'm working my way through the "Sharpe" series by Bernard Cornwell, good reading 8)
    Having read all the Sharpe books I can thoroughly agree with you there. In my opinion though Bernard Cornwell's best work is in the Warlord triology of Arthur books. They are absolutely fantastic. The Grail Quest and Starbuck books are also good reads. In fact since I've read 33 of his 40 books I can't say I've read a bad one yet.

  27. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Lee
    Currently reading "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince". Cracking read so far.
    Finished it last week. Found it boring till Hogswarts exploded, now that was cool.
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    Just kidding about Hogwarts.

  28. #78
    Guest

    Must reads

    Hello Everyone,

    Read Gabriel Garcia Marquez's " One Hundred Years of Solitude"

  29. #79
    Master chrisb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Lee
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisb
    I'm working my way through the "Sharpe" series by Bernard Cornwell, good reading 8)
    Having read all the Sharpe books I can thoroughly agree with you there. In my opinion though Bernard Cornwell's best work is in the Warlord triology of Arthur books. They are absolutely fantastic. The Grail Quest and Starbuck books are also good reads. In fact since I've read 33 of his 40 books I can't say I've read a bad one yet.
    I agree about the Arthur books, but I also like his more modern ones...Sea Lord, Crackdown etc

  30. #80
    On holiday whilst topping up my tan :wink: I read "The Real Bravo Two Zero" by Michael Asher having read "Bravo Two Zero" by Andy McNab I can only say that Asher debunks nearly all of McNabs book it is a fantastic book and if you have read McNabs then you must read Ashers.... :D

    Very Emotional

  31. #81
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    I am now reading "The Enforcer"

    Biography of Albert Donahue, Reggies minder in the Kray firm.

    A very interesting read about London in the 1960's.
    Cheers,
    Neil.

    My Speedmaster website:

    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  32. #82
    Hi again All,
    I've just finished re-reading "The Climb up to Hell" by Jack Olsen, this is the second time I've read it and I reckon the second time of reading is as good as, if not better than, the first.
    Gripping, Thrilling, Stuff
    Richie

  33. #83
    Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic by
    Tom Holland. Brilliant narrative history!

  34. #84
    Master worlok's Avatar
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    Put this one down for the time being and moved on to some non fiction



    Cramer's book


  35. #85
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    Do Jazz Mags Count?

    Got a good Mayfair and Club the other week.

    Rob.

  36. #86
    I'm just finishing Castles of Steel by Robert K. Massie about the RN in WWI (on p. 673 of 865). Amongst other things, it got me finally to understand the contexts of the Dardanelles, Gallipoli and Jutland. And to more fully to grasp the stategic thinking of Jellicoe.

    Best wishes,
    Bob

  37. #87
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    Reading "Black wind" by Clive Cussler.

    Dirk jr has taken over the business. :o
    Cheers,
    Neil.

    My Speedmaster website:

    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  38. #88
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    I read mainly in bed and don't want anything too taxing. I tend to read a particular author until I have exhausted their works but recently I've bought some collections for re-reads of books I've read in the past. In the queue are:

    All the Fleming "Bond" Books
    Sherlock Holmes collection
    Tom Sharpe collection

    I've read most Jeffrey Deaver, Dan Brown, Stephen King, James Herbert, Shaun Hutson, Patricia Cornwell, Ian Rankin, Steve Harris, Dean Koontz and several others I can't recall right now. I don't only read fiction though, I like autobiographies and "unauthorised" biographies (although I suppose you could list many of these under "fiction").

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  39. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by swanbourne
    I read mainly in bed and don't want anything too taxing. I tend to read a particular author until I have exhausted their works but recently I've bought some collections for re-reads of books I've read in the past. In the queue are:

    All the Fleming "Bond" Books
    Sherlock Holmes collection
    Tom Sharpe collection

    I've read most Jeffrey Deaver, Dan Brown, Stephen King, James Herbert, Shaun Hutson, Patricia Cornwell, Ian Rankin, Steve Harris, Dean Koontz and several others I can't recall right now. I don't only read fiction though, I like autobiographies and "unauthorised" biographies (although I suppose you could list many of these under "fiction").

    Eddie
    If you can find them, try something by Anthony Price. They are nearly the best "spy" novels ever. I have the set of about 12, and must get through 6 a year. Some I've read 4 or 5 times. ;)

    Best wishes,
    Bob

    PS This is if you like series of books.
    RLF

  40. #90
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    Thank you Bob, I'll look at these.

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  41. #91
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    Just finished "Absolute Friends" by le Carre. I'm now working my way through "The Confusion" by Neal Stephenson.

    Eddie, I enjoy Cromwell and Deaver also.

    Bob, I am going to try Anthony Price as his name keeps popping up. Any suggestions for a good one to start with?

    Ted

  42. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by dashiel
    Just finished "Absolute Friends" by le Carre. I'm now working my way through "The Confusion" by Neal Stephenson.

    Eddie, I enjoy Cromwell and Deaver also.

    Bob, I am going to try Anthony Price as his name keeps popping up. Any suggestions for a good one to start with?

    Ted
    The first in order is The Labyrinth Makers. I read them in the order of finding them at second hand book stores. I don't think that I've ever read them in any particular order. Just goes to show that I live on the edge, eh, :)

    Best wishes,
    Bob

  43. #93
    I think Neal Stephephenson is an excellent author, Snow Crash is possibly my favourite read. I also liked Cryptonomicon and The Diamond Age, but Snow Crash is fantastic :wink:

  44. #94
    Administrator swanbourne's Avatar
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    I've asked this question before. I'm sure I saw something about a book where following a burglary, the police found a sample of blood and ran it through their computers. The DNA came up as a perfect match with the blood on the Turnin Shroud.

    Anybody any idea what this is? Did I imagine it? Is it a suitable subject for my next novel?

    Eddie
    Whole chunks of my life come under the heading "it seemed like a good idea at the time".

  45. #95
    Just thought I'd mention that if any of you see the following book in a secondhand bookstore get it



    It has the scripts from all nine of the programmes ( Tomkinsons Schooldays, Across the Andes by Frog, The Testing of Eric Olthwaite, Murder at Moorstones Manor, Escape from Stalag Luft 112B, The Curse of the Claw, Roger of the Raj, Winfreys last case and the absolutely spiffing Golden Gordon ). It has been out of print for a while and is getting harder to find.
    A quote from the cover
    " Here now are the complete texts of all nine of the classic yarns which set british television back 60 Years"
    Top F"cking Book
    " Laugh ? I thought my pants would never dry !"

  46. #96
    I will keep my eye out looks a good laugh.
    My favorite author are Iain Banks (reed Crows Road it excelent)
    his books are well writen and entertaining.
    Unfortunatly my reading today is "General Pathology Vivas for MRCS" :( Oh well
    Phil

  47. #97
    Master Ron Jr's Avatar
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    Just finishing H.G. Wells "War of the Worlds".

  48. #98
    Master worlok's Avatar
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    In between my serious investor and not so serious Cussler reading, I picked up this for some light Autumn escapism into another era.

    I thought it fitting seeing as how Tarrytown and Sleepy Hollow are just up the highway and over the TappanZee from where I live.




  49. #99
    I can highly recommend Richard Stark's "Parker" novels to anyone who enjoys hard-boiled crime fiction.

    http://www.twbookmark.com/authors/56/74 ... raise.html

    http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Nook/5171/

    Next to Raymond Chandler these are my favourite crime novels - although as a writer Stark couldn't be much more different. He never wastes a word and the books are never a sentence longer than they need to be. I find them compelling.

    Stark (a pseudonym of Donald E. Westlake) started writing these books in the early sixties, and most of the earlier novels (which are the best in my view, although all of them are good) are out of print. However it's not difficult to find them second hand - Abebooks has loads for instance.

  50. #100
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    I'm probably in a very small minority because I just cannot read any fiction ... I've tried many times ... but after the first chapter I just do not have the patience to continue. Thus I only read non fiction ... currently re-reading Dennis Jenkinson's 'The Racing Car Pocket Book' ... a veritable mini encyclopaedia of the history of 20th C racing cars up to 1962. One of my favourite books is Brewers Dictionary of Phrase and Fable ... because it can be 'browsed' ... also have quite a few watches books ... and lots on the history and construction of violins. Give me facts and I'm happy. But I love messing about with words ... I'm also a bit of a poet and have had a few poems published.

    Duncan
    "My friends, as I have discovered myself, there are no disasters, only opportunities. And, indeed, opportunities for fresh disasters ..." Boris Johnson After being sacked from the Tory front bench, 2004

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