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Thread: Anyone read any good books recently ?

  1. #2051
    Master wildheart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andymonkey View Post
    Bring It On Home by Mark Blake. Bio of Peter Grant the Led Zeppelin manager. Some great stories of a time gone by...


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    Best book on Led Zeppelin I have read so well researched, a lot of the stories came from Peter Grants children.

  2. #2052
    I finished another Iain M Banks book, "Surface Detail." Another brilliant book that makes you think and concentrate to fully comprehend it as well as its analogies to real life. I am finding it increasingly difficult to read other authors, in particular sci-fi ones. It's very sad there won't be more books set in the "Culture" universe/galaxy. No one could do it any justice to tell you the truth.

    Tried reading Ursula K Le Guin's "The Dispossessed" but couldn't get into it. I have Vernor Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep" on order.

    Dickens "A Christmas Carol" is next.

  3. #2053
    A Man For All Markets - Edward Thorp

    Real story on beating the casinos and stock market.

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  4. #2054
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ventura View Post
    I finished another Iain M Banks book, "Surface Detail." Another brilliant book that makes you think and concentrate to fully comprehend it as well as its analogies to real life. I am finding it increasingly difficult to read other authors, in particular sci-fi ones. It's very sad there won't be more books set in the "Culture" universe/galaxy. No one could do it any justice to tell you the truth.

    Tried reading Ursula K Le Guin's "The Dispossessed" but couldn't get into it. I have Vernor Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep" on order.

    Dickens "A Christmas Carol" is next.
    Try Neal Asher and Richard Morgan , neither are as good as Banks but still a cut above most. Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons is great (first trilogy...second not so much) and anything by William Gibson.

  5. #2055
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    Yup feel the same sense of loss that there won’t be any more Culture novels, Use of Weapons is a fave of mine. His non sci fi work as Iain Banks is also a pleasure, Complicity among others is a good read. Also like Richard Morgan, his anti hero Takeshi Kovacs serves up stylish ultra violence. Gibson’s a legend.
    Last edited by Passenger; 3rd January 2020 at 03:42.

  6. #2056
    Master Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by inthered View Post
    First Light - the autobiography of Geoffrey Wellum, left school in 1939 age 17 to join the RAF to train as a fighter pilot, an absolutely compelling story and a personal insight into the Battle of Britain.
    +1, a brilliant, 'cant put down' read.
    If you enjoyed that, read Last of the Hurricanes'
    Just finished SAS Mark 'Billy' Billingham's book, The Hard Way. What a soldier!

  7. #2057
    Master Mark020's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildheart View Post
    Best book on Led Zeppelin I have read so well researched, a lot of the stories came from Peter Grants children.
    Just finished it. Very nice book.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by ahandle View Post
    A Man For All Markets - Edward Thorp

    Real story on beating the casinos and stock market.

    Sent from my COL-L29 using Tapatalk
    One of the best books I've ever read

  8. #2058
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.D View Post
    Try Neal Asher and Richard Morgan , neither are as good as Banks but still a cut above most. Hyperion Cantos by Dan Simmons is great (first trilogy...second not so much) and anything by William Gibson.
    Quote Originally Posted by Passenger View Post
    Yup feel the same sense of loss that there wonít be any more Culture novels, Use of Weapons is a fave of mine. His non sci fi work as Iain Banks is also a pleasure, Complicity among others is a good read. Also like Richard Morgan, his anti hero Takeshi Kovacs serves up stylish ultra violence. Gibsonís a legend.
    Thanks for the suggestions. I have tried reading his non science fiction fiction, but most of it is written in the first person and I find it very difficult to read. Having said that I have just read The Wasp Factory and though good for most authors it's not as brilliant as his sci-fi. I may have to read his non Culture sci-fi.

    As for Richard Morgan, his Kovacs novels are first person and am not a fan as previously stated. The only first person I don't have a problem with, as it's not focused purely on it is Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes.

    Stephen Baxter as said earlier in the thread is good, but he's more of an ideas man, rather than
    a story teller. Pity that he and Iain didn't do a book together.

  9. #2059
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ventura View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. I have tried reading his non science fiction fiction, but most of it is written in the first person r.
    Neal Asher youíll like , similar to Banks but not quite as deep.

  10. #2060
    Thanks, where do you suggest I start with him?

  11. #2061
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ventura View Post
    Thanks, where do you suggest I start with him?
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neal...olity_universe

    This should explain , Gridlinked is a good start I liked the spatterjay series more but the polity books get you familiar with the world building. Its like an earlier version of the Culture , you could see the polity ending up like them.

  12. #2062
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    I'm re-reading Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. It's my favorite book of all time, hands down. Funny, interesting, easy to follow yet complex enough to tease the mind. It's beautiful.

  13. #2063
    Grand Master Neil.C's Avatar
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    I'm into The Murder Room by PD James.

    Enjoying it so far.
    Cheers,
    Neil.

    My Speedmaster website:

    http://www.freewebs.com/neil271052

  14. #2064
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    Just finished 34 years in hell , a very interesting true story not the best written if Iím honest but I enjoyed the insight

  15. #2065
    Brief Answers to the Big Questions - Stephen Hawkin

    A pretty easy read, despite the subject matter, which is fascinating and mind boggling at the same time.

  16. #2066
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    May I recommend "The Uninhabitable Earth" by David Wallace-Wells

    This well researched and written tome portrays an incredibly worrying short term future for our planet (think next 100 years). I am no Greta Thunberg fanboy and have been guilty of having my head in the sand regarding the climate change movement but this book has made me feel rather ashamed of the potential legacy we are leaving for future generations.

  17. #2067
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisparker View Post
    Brief Answers to the Big Questions - Stephen Hawkin

    A pretty easy read, despite the subject matter, which is fascinating and mind boggling at the same time.
    Starting reading this which was Christmas gift.

    Just finished Something Deeply Hidden - Sean Carroll. About quantum weirdness and many worlds theory. Surprisingly enjoyable but quite tough - will probably reread in few months.

  18. #2068
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    I'm currently about 2/3rds of the way through Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker - it's a hefty book but completely mind blowing, if you weren't a sleep zealot already, you will be after this!

  19. #2069
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    Not long finished "Battle Scars" by Jason Fox.

    Gives a very interesting account of PTSD from an elite soldiers perspective.

    He throws away most of the machismo that might be associated with SAS/SBS soldiers and gives a brutally honest account of what some of these people must go to.

    Definitely worth a read as a means of trying to gain insight as to what PTSD can mean for some, and also how difficult it can be for former members of the military to adapt to life afterwards.

    Also goes to show that these people dont necessarily get the help they need from the military, especially after giving so much.

  20. #2070
    Have read "A Christmas Carol." It was an interesting read. Will probably try more Dickens.

    Read through "The Wasp Factory," Iain Banks, and I thought it was good, but first person isn't for me.

    Just finished "1984," George Orwell. It was amazing how relevant it is now with all the connected technology stuff, surveillance, political correctness being analogous to state run fascism etc. I was surprised that for a book written decades ago it is still very relevant.

  21. #2071
    Grand Master sundial's Avatar
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    'THE DIET MYTH' by Prof Tim Spector.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=the+die...l_8usbihrxf2_e

    ... an eye opener as regards safe weight loss and healthy diet to boost the immune system and thus prevent and remedy health problems ... and it explains addictions and their risks. Also worth watching his You Tube videos https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...ry=tim+spector

    dunk
    Last edited by sundial; 15th January 2020 at 10:11.
    "The energy expenditure of most people's weekly gym class workouts equates to the reward of one large doughnut afterwards" Ö Prof. Tim Spector, 'The Diet Myth' author

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